Nicola Barker

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“The book is a kind of implosion, emotionally and intellectually, and you just wait for some kind of rhythm to form.... And then I will work all day, every day.” Nicola Barker, who won the 2017 Goldsmiths Prize for her novel H(a)ppy (William Heinemann, 2017), talks to Granta about her writing process and the difficulty of transitioning from writing on a digital screen to seeing the book in print form.

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Elif Batuman

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“The main advice I would have is to be really easy on yourself, to shut off as much as you can the voice that’s saying maybe you’re wasting your time, and maybe everything that you do is stupid.” Elif Batuman, a finalist for the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for her debut novel, The Idiot (Penguin Press, 2017), talks to Granta about the literary model of Charles M. Schulz’s Snoopy and the blurred boundary between fiction and nonfiction.

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Megan Hunter and Max Porter

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“To me, the world of novels often doesn’t feel real, and I was certainly quite aware of writing something kind of between poetry and prose.” Megan Hunter reads from her debut novel, The End We Start From (Grove Press, 2017), which is featured in Page One in the November/December issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, and talks with Granta editorial director Max Porter about writing speculative fiction.

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Esmé Weijun Wang

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“The way that I write fiction is to kind of go in and just wander around.” In this video, Granta magazine’s Josie Mitchell speaks to Esmé Weijun Wang about her debut novel, The Border of Paradise (Unnamed Press, 2016), and her forthcoming essay collection, The Collected Schizophrenias, which won the 2016 Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize.

Joshua Cohen

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“So much of my writing is supposed to fend off the autobiographical that I’ve managed to fend it off within myself as a personal practice.” Joshua Cohen, author of the novel Moving Kings (Random House, 2017) and one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists of 2017, talks about playing with the autobiographical impulse and writing as an existential practice.

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Lost Cat

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"It's hard to protect a person you love from pain, because people often choose pain. I am a person who often chooses pain. An animal will never choose pain." Mary Gaitskill, whose new novel, The Mare (Pantheon Books, 2015), is featured in Page One in the November/December issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, reads from her personal essay "Lost Cat" (Granta, 2009) at Baruch College.

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