May/June 2008

May/June 2008 cover

Our cover story is a profile of Valzhyna Mort, the young Belarusian poet whose American debut is infused with the music of her homeland.

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Features

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Agents & Editors: A Q&A With Agent Nat Sobel

by Jofie Ferrari-Adler

Agent Nat Sobel, one of the most forward-thinking and outspoken agents in the business, voices his opinions on what authors should do for themselves, the dangers of MFA programs, and what he finds in literary magazines.

You Cannot Tell This to Anybody: A Profile of Valzhyna Mort

by Kevin Nance
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For Valzhyna Mort, the young Belarusian poet whose American debut is infused with the music of her homeland, the future of poetry is an unflinching look at the past.

Where the Real World Lies: A Profile of Lee Martin

by Amos Magliocco
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In his third novel, the follow-up to his Pulitzer Prize finalist The Bright Forever, Lee Martin portrays how the secrets of our past come to define us.

Literary Magazines

Saving the Short Story

by Katherine Hill
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Editor Hannah Tinti and publisher Maribeth Batcha discuss the history of One Story as the magazine hit the one-hundred-issue mark.

Five Tips for Submitting Your Work

by Staff
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Step-by-step advice on how to get your submission noticed

Through the Eyes of the Editors

by Stephanie Fiorelli, Stephen Corey, David Hamilton
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The editors of Avery, the Georgia Review, and the Iowa Review give their perspectives on what makes a literary journal work, the changes happening at magazines, and what those changes mean for writers.

Twenty New Journals Ready to Read Your Work

by Staff
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Details on literary magazines from across the country looking for poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

News and Trends

Such Sweet Sorrow

by Joshua Bodwell

Speculation and rumor continue to drive the gossip surrounding Tom Wolfe’s and Richard Ford’s decisions to leave their former publishing houses, but their true reasons remain a mystery.

Way, Way Too Much Information

by Frank Bures

Today, it seems that we have access to an unlimited amount of information all the time, and for those of us who want to be alone with our thoughts, that information is getting harder and harder to avoid. More and more of us suffer from a condition sometimes called "digital information overload," or "infomania."

Literary MagNet

by Kevin Larimer

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Ninth Letter, Oxford American, and the Literary Review.

Small Press Points

by Kevin Larimer

Small Press Points highlights the happenings of the small press players. This issue features BOA Editions, Ltd., Four Way Books, Wave Books, Anhinga Press, Copper Canyon Press, Margie/IntuiT House, Graywolf Press, and Cy Gist Press.

 

Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from The Film Club by David Gilmour and The Story of a Marriage by Andrew Sean Greer.

 

The Practical Writer

Putting Your Poetry in Order: The Mix-Tape Strategy

by Katrina Vandenberg

Ordering poems becomes a familiar act if you consider the lyric poem in its original form—the song. And if you were the kind of incessant list-maker Nick Hornby describes in his novel High Fidelity, the kind who also made mix tapes from your album collection. If you were the kind of geek my college boyfriend, Tim, was and—admittedly—the kind I was too.

First: Melissa J. Delbridge’s Family Bible

by Amy Rosenberg
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In her debut essay collection, fifty-five-year-old Alabama native Melissa J. Delbridge explores conflicts of religion, race, and sexuality that she encountered while growing up in Tuscaloosa.

The Literary Life

Chinese Characters: Report From Literary Beijing

by Stephen Morison Jr.
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The political and cultural changes of the past thirty years have distinctly affected each generation of Chinese writers, creating rifts across Beijing's current literary landscape.

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