literary sites

Stephen Crane House

Located in Asbury Park, New Jersey, the Stephen Crane House is where the author of The Red Badge of Courage spent some of his most formative years. Since 1995, the house has been the venue for hundreds of literary, musical, visual, and other cultural programs dedicated to the memory of Crane and his family.

Boswell Book Company

Boswell Book Company opened in April 2009 in the Downer Avenue location of Harry W. Schwartz Bookshop, a beloved Milwaukee bookstore that had closed a month earlier after seventy-two years in business. Boswell's owner, Daniel Goldin, was the long-time book buyer for Schwartz.

The Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians

The Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians operates a museum in McCullers's childhood home, presents extensive educational and cultural programs for the community, maintains an ever-growing archive of materials related to the life and work of McCullers, and offers fellowships for writers and composers who live for periods of time in the Smith-McCullers home in Columbus.

Bancroft Library

The primary special collections library at the University of California, Berkeley, Bancroft Library houses more than 600,000 volumes, 60,000,000 manuscript items, 8,000,000 photographs/pictorial materials, 43,000 microforms, and 23,000 maps. Notable holdings include the papers and archival materials on Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, and Gwendolyn Brooks.

Stanford University's Special Collections and University Archives

Located at Stanford University, the Special Collections and University Archives house over 48,000 linear feet of original materials, an additional 45,000 individual items and handwritten volumes as well as over 200,000 rare books. The collections contain a wide range of formats ranging from 700,000 photographs and slides, 12,000 prints, 22,000 audio tapes, 9,200 videos and more than 24,000 items of legacy computer media. Stanford University owns archival material, manuscripts, and papers of D.H. Lawrence, Allen Ginsberg, Denise Levertov, Robert Creeley, Robert Pinsky, and Fanny Howe.

The Frost Place

Founded in 1976 as a nonprofit educational center for poetry and the arts, the Frost Place is located in the farmhouse where poet Robert Frost and his family lived full-time from 1915 to 1920 and spent nineteen summers. It sponsors an annual summer residency given to an emerging American poet, as well as the annual Festival and Conference on Poetry for writers seeking classes and workshops with a faculty of illustrious poets, a teachers’ conference, and an advanced seminar.

Thurber House

Thurber House was the home to James Thurber and his family when he attended Ohio State University (from 1913-1917), and today it serves as a non-profit literary center and Thurber museum. The museum encourages interaction, and visitors are invited to sit on the chairs, play a chord on the piano, and experience the museum as if they were the Thurber's guests. Programs of the Thurber House include the Thurber Prize for Humor, a month-long residency for writers of children's literature, author readings, writing classes for children and adults, and a museum of Thurber memorabilia. 

Walt Whitman Birthplace

The Walt Whitman Birthplace was built in 1819 by Walter Whitman, father to the poet Walt Whitman. Today the Birthplace house and Interpretive Center offer guided tours, a museum shop and bookstore, picnic facilities, auto-hiking tours of West Hills, concerts, lectures, poetry readings, poetry contests, and a Poet-in-Residence program.

The Mount

Built and designed by Edith Wharton in 1902, The Mount is both a historic site and a center for culture inspired by the passions of the American novelist. The property includes three acres of formal gardens designed by Wharton, who was also an authority on European landscape design, surrounded by extensive woodlands. Programming at The Mount reflects Wharton’s core interests in the literary arts, interior design and decoration, garden and landscape design, and the art of living. Annual exhibits explore themes from Wharton’s life and work.

The Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum

Built in 1851 and home to Ernest Hemingway for more than ten years (starting in 1931), this house in Key West, Florida is now open to the public as a Hemingway museum and bookstore. Today, the estate still remains to be the single largest residential property on the island of Key West. Guided tours of the house and gardens are available.

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