literary sites

Grub Street

Founded in 1997, Grub Street is one of the largest independent centers for creative writing in the United States; its mission is "to be an innovative, rigorous, and welcoming community for writers who together create their best work, find audience, and elevate the literary arts for all." Sponsor of the annual Muse and Marketplace Conference held each spring, Grub Street offers a range of workshops and services, including a year-long class on novel writing, a class on yoga and writing, instruction on how to get publi

Robinson Jeffers Tor House

Robinson Jeffers built Tor House and Hawk Tower as a home and refuge for himself and his family.  It was in Tor House that Jeffers wrote all of his major poetical works: the long narratives of "this coast crying out for tragedy," the shorter meditative lyrics and dramas on classical themes, culminating in 1947 with the critically acclaimed adaptation of Medea for the Broadway stage. The Tor House Foundation offers docent-led tours and curates a performance and reading series.

Paul Laurence Dunbar House

A modest two-story red brick building with nine rooms, the Paul Laurence Dunbar House was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. The surrounding Dunbar Historic District, named after the poet and author, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on June 30, 1980. Dunbar wrote many of his works while living in Dayton. Today, the house serves as a Dunbar museum and is open for tours.

Mark Twain House

The Mark Twain House & Museum, a National Historic Landmark in Hartford, Connecticut, was the home of Samuel Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain) and his family from 1874 to 1891. It is also where Twain lived when he wrote his most important works, including The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Prince and The Pauper and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. Daily tours, special events and educational programs are available.

Kerouac House

Jack Kerouac lived in this house in Orlando, Florida at the time On the Road made him a national sensation. Kerouac also wrote his follow-up to On the Road, The Dharma Bums, at this location in the course of eleven days and nights. Today, the Kerouac House gives tours of the house and The Kerouac Project provides four residencies a year to writers.

James Merrill House

James Merrill came to Stonington in 1954 and took up residence at 107 Water Street with his companion, David Jackson. Merrill spent summers in Stonington until his death in 1995. James Merrill's apartment is open to the general public four afternoons a year. At other times, visits may be arranged by appointment. The James Merrill House Writer-in-Residence Program offers one 4-1/2 month residency between mid-January and the end of May, and three shorter residencies of 2 to 6 weeks during the months between Labor Day and mid-January.

Eudora Welty House

For 76 years, Eudora Welty lived and wrote in her home on 1119 Pinehurst Place in Jackson, Mississippi. The Eudora Welty House is a National Historic Landmark and one of the nation's most intact literary house museums. Restored by the Mississipi Department of Archives and History after her death in 2001, the Eudora Welty House is open for tours by reservation. 

Emily Dickinson Museum

The Emily Dickinson Museum comprises two historic houses in the center of Amherst, Massachusetts, associated with the poet Emily Dickinson and members of her family during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Homestead was the birthplace and home of the poet Emily Dickinson. The Evergreens, next door, was home to her brother Austin, his wife Susan, and their three children. The Museum is open March through December for guided tours, public programs, and other special events.

Willa Cather's Childhood Home

Willa Cather came to Nebraska from Virginia in 1883 when she was nine years old. The Cather family lived in this home in Red Cloud from 1884 to 1904, a formative period in Cather's development as a writer. Willa Cather describes the house in great detail in her novel The Song of the Lark and her short story “Old Mrs. Harris.” Visitors can see some of her original possessions still displayed there, as well as the family’s household items throughout the home.

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