literary sites

Washington Irving's Sunnyside

Author Washington Irving designed his Sunnyside home himself, starting in 1835. The grounds reflect Irving's romantic view of art, nature, and history. Visitors can tour the Sunnyside house and gardens with a guide in mid-nineteenth-century dress.

Fales Library and Special Collections

The Fales Library, comprising nearly 200,000 volumes, close to 9,000 linear feet of archive and manuscript materials, and about 65,000 media elements, houses the Fales Collection of rare books and manuscripts in English and American literature, including the papers of writers such as E. L. Doctorow, Erich Maria Remarque, and William Zinsser.

Cornell University's Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections

The principal repository of rare books, manuscripts and archival materials at Cornell University, the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections houses 430,000 printed volumes and more than 80 million manuscripts. Notable holdings include the papers and archival materials of James Joyce, E.B. White, Vladimir Nabokov, William Wordsworth, A.R. Ammons, and George Bernard Shaw. The library also serves as a resource center for the study of book history, offering both a semester course in the Cornell English Department and a weeklong summer course for Cornell Adult University. 

Square Books

Square Books is a general independent bookstore in three separate buildings (about 100 feet apart) on the historic town square of Oxford, Mississippi.  The main store, Square Books, is in a two-story building with a cafe and balcony on the second floor; Off Square Books is a few doors down from the main store and has lifestyle sections such as gardening and cookbooks; and Square Books Jr, the children's bookstore, is in a building on the east side of the square.

Rowan Oak

Built in 1844, Rowan Oak was the home to William Faulkner and his family for over forty years. The house and its grounds are open to visitors for guided tours, but tour groups are encouraged to make arrangements ahead of time.

Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home

Located in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, the Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home is where the Nobel Prize-winning author spent his early years. The home, which also for a time served as the office of Dr. Lewis' medical practice, has been restored with antiques appropriate to the period.  Many rooms contain items that were known to belong to the Lewis family themselves.  Tours are offered.

The Theodore Roethke Home Museum

Located in Saginaw, Michigan, the Theodore Roethke Home Museum is the childhood home of the Pulitzer Prize winning poet, Theodore Roethke (1908–1963). The Friends of Theodore Roethke Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation whose mission is to promote, preserve, and protect the literary legacy of Theodore Roethke, currently offers tours of the house, along with poetry readings, talks, workshops, and school programs.

Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden

The Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden is a historic landmark located in the green quadrangle at the center of the Springfield Museums and the Springfield City Library. Theodor Seuss Geisel was born in Springfield, and the city is said to have inspired much of his work. His stepdaughter, sculptor Lark Grey Dimond-Cates, created the bronze sculptures of Dr. Seuss and several of his characters, including Horton, the Cat in the Hat, the Grinch, the Storyteller, and the Lorax.

Hours are 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM daily.

William Cullen Bryant Homestead

The William Cullen Bryant Homestead is the boyhood home and later summer residence of William Cullen Bryant. Currently operated by the nonprofit Trustees of Reservations, the homestead is open to the public. Guided tours are available.

The Old Manse

Built in 1770 for patriot minister William Emerson, The Old Manse, a National Historic Landmark, became the center of Concord’s political, literary, and social revolutions over the course of the next century. In the mid-nineteenth-century, leading Transcendentalists such as Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller discussed the issues of the day here, with the Hawthorne and Ripley families.

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