literary sites

Ralph Waldo Emerson House

Built in 1828, this square frame house served as the home to Ralph Waldo Emerson and his second wife, Lydia Jackson, from 1835 to his death in 1882. Today, the house still contains many of Emerson's personal effects and the home's original furnishings. Guided tours are offered from mid-April to mid-October.


Walden Pond and Thoreau Cabin

Henry David Thoreau lived at Walden Pond from July 1845 to September 1847. Today, Walden Pond has been designated a National Historic Landmark and is considered the birthplace of the conservation movement. Park Interpreters provide tours and ongoing educational programs. Visitors can visit a replica of Thoreau's one-room cabin and are welcome to swim, picnic, hike, use canoes and rowboats, fish, cross-country ski and snowshoe at the pond. 

Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House

Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House (circa 1690) is most noted for being home to the Alcott family. The house is also where Louisa May Alcott wrote and set her novel, Little Women, in 1868. Today, the house is open year-round and guided tours are available.

Houghton Library

The primary repository for rare books and manuscripts at Harvard University, the Houghton Library houses collections that focus on the study of Western civilization. Materials relating to American, Continental, and English history and literature comprise the bulk of these collections and include special concentrations in printing, graphic arts, and the theatre. Contained within the library are the papers of Samuel Johnson, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Margaret Fuller, John Keats, Gore Vidal, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Louisa May Alcott, Theodore Roosevelt, T.S. Eliot, E.E.

Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Museum

The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Museum preserves the birthplace home of the author Pearl S. Buck and interprets her life from its origins in the Appalachian town of Hillsboro, West Virginia, to her rise to international recognition as a Nobel Prize–winning author. Buck herself established the Pearl S. Buck Birthplace as a monument to her late mother, Carrie. The grounds of the museum include thirteen acres of scenic Appalachian farmland, a period carpentry shop, and a barn with over one hundred historic farm and woodworking tools.

Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Home

Ernest Hemingway was born and spent his first six years in this Queen Anne Victorian house in Oak Park, Illinois. Today, the house is owned and administered by the Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park, which also runs the Ernest Hemingway Museum, housed inside the Oak Park Arts Center a few blocks away from the birthplace home.

John Hay Library

The special collections library of Brown University, the John Hay Library contains more than 3,000,000 items. Holdings range from Babylonian clay tablets and Egyptian papyri to current-day books, manuscripts, and ephemera. Among the more unexpected items are portraits and paintings by old masters, Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s tea set, Napoleon’s death mask, 6,000 toy soldiers, the last daguerrotype taken of Poe, and Whitman’s personal copy of Leaves of Grass. Other notable holdings include the papers and archival materials of Henry David Thoreau, George Orwell, William Blake, and H.G.

Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library

Located in Indianapolis, the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library is a public-benefit, nonprofit organization championing the literary, artistic, and cultural contributions of the late soldier, writer, artist, and Indianapolis native Kurt Vonnegut. The library serves as a cultural and educational resource facility, museum, art gallery, and reading room. It also supports language and visual arts education through programs and outreach activities with other local arts organizations.

The Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum

Located in Montgomery, Alabama, the Fitzgerald Museum is a nonprofit organization dedicated to celebrating the life and works of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. The Fitzgerald House was the residence of F. Scott, Zelda, and their daughter, Scottie, from 1931 to 1932. The Fitzgerald House was saved from demolition in 1986, making it the only remaining residence of the famous couple in Montgomery. Today, the museum hosts performances, galas, silent auctions, and other literary events.

 

Wellesley Books

Located in Wellesley, Massachussetts, Wellesley Books is a locally-owned, independent bookstore that carries children's books, a selection of cards and gifts, new fiction and nonfiction books, and "gently read" titles. The store hosts readings, author events, and book club meetings.

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