literary sites

John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections

Boston College's Burns Library is home to more than 250,000 volumes, some 16,000,000 manuscripts and important collections of architectural records, maps, art works, newspapers, photographs, films, prints, artifacts and ephemera. Holdings include manuscripts and published works of Samuel T. Coleridge, Graham Greene, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Evelyn Waugh, William Wordsworth, and Samuel Beckett.

Grolier Poetry Bookshop

Founded in 1927 by Adrian Gambet and Gordon Cairnie, the original Grolier book shop stocked mainly private press books, some poetry, and a sampling of avant-garde literature. Today, Grolier is the oldest continuous poetry book shop in the United States, and stocks over 15,000 current volumes of trade, small press, and university publications as well as books related to prosody, poetry markets, and spoken word CDs. The store hosts regular readings, author events, book signings, and more. 

Longfellow House

Built in 1759 by a wealthy royalist, this house was occupied by Henry W. Longfellow from 1837 to 1882. Previously, the house also served as headquarters for General George Washington during the Siege of Boston, and has seen the company of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, John Hancock, and other revolutionary leaders. The house and grounds are open to the public every day of the year, with special group and student tours available.

Longfellow Books

Located in the heart of Portland, Longfellow Books sells both new and used books and hosts author readings and a book club. It also offers free parking, free gift wrapping, free advice, free dog biscuits, and free knowledge about books. 

Ernest Hemingway Museum in Oak Park

A short walk from the Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Museum, housed inside the Oak Park Arts Center, the Ernest Hemingway Museum is host to permanent and temporary exhibits that explore the author's life. Kiosks fashioned from historic doors hold exhibits of rare photos and artifacts. Special exhibits highlight Hemingway's love of nature and the arts, along with his involvement in both World Wars and the movies. A museum bookshop features books by and about the author, gift items, videos, and posters. Guided tours are available.

Casa Genotta

Located within the resort community of Sea Island, Georgia, this landmark was once home to American playwright Eugene O'Neill and his wife, Carlotta. O'Neill was the first American to introduce realism, which was associated with Anton Chekhov, into dramatic tragedy. He was also one of the first playwrights to incorporate speeches using the American vernacular. O'Neill won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama three times in his lifetime, for Beyond the Horizon (1920), Anna Christie (1922), and Strange Interlude (1928).

The Casa Antigua

Built in 1919, the Casa Antigua was once the Trev-Mor Hotel, which was home to Ernest Hemingway from 1928 to 1930 and is where he is said to have written A Farewell to Arms. Today, located between Eaton and Caroline streets, the Casa Antigua is home to the Pelican Poop Shoppe, a souvenir and antique store offering a variety of gifts and oddities such as art prints by Key West artists, tropical Christmas ornaments, and hand-beaded purses.

The Ninth Street Book Shop

Established in 1977 by Delaware school teachers Jack and Gemma Buckley, the Ninth Street Book Shop is a family-owned independent bookstore featuring a wide selection of bestsellers, children's books, new releases, books by local authors, and autographed copies. In spite of its name, the Ninth Street Book Shop is located at at the corner of Eighth and Market streets in downtown Wilmington. It offers a frequent buyer rewards program and participiates in Recyclebank, which rewards green actions such as recycling with points that can be redeemed for coupons to the bookstore.

Maxwell E. Perkins House

Built by Hiram Crissey in 1836, this Greek Revival house was home to Maxwell E. Perkins, the editor of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Thomas Wolfe. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. The house is privately owned and is not open to the public.

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