Hugo House

Founded in 1997, the Hugo House offers writing classes and events, including the annual Hugo Literary Series, which invites established and up-and-coming writers to create new work and debut it at the house, and the Zine Archive and Publishing Project, which maintains a library of more than 20,000 handmade and independent publications. Residencies, one for an established writer and one for a youth writers, are also offered.

Detroit Public Library: Main Branch

The Detroit Public Library opened for service on March 25, 1865. The five thousand book collection was located in one room of the old Capitol High School on Griswold Street. The Main Library, a white marble Italian Renaissance style building designed by Cass Gilbert and partially funded by a gift from Andrew Carnegie, opened in 1921. The building offers several spaces open to the public for meetings and events, and the library hosts an author reading series, as well as other literary events.

Detroit Public Library

Emory University’s Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

The Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library’s extensive manuscript, archival, and rare book collections include the Emory University Archives, African American Collections, literary and poetry collections, along with collections documenting political, cultural, and social movements. The special collections of the Rose Library span the 15th to the 21st centuries—with particular depth in modern literature, African American history, Emory University history, and the history of Georgia and the South.

Wendy’s Subway

Wendy’s Subway is a nonprofit library and workspace that hosts a range of public programs, including interdisciplinary readings and screenings, talks and lectures, discussion and reading groups, writing workshops, and free courses. Its noncirculating library holds a collection of books and documents with a special focus on poetry, art, theory, and philosophy, as well as the Laurin Raiken Archive, an extensive resource for the study of art history and criticism.

Poets House

Founded in 1985 by the late U.S. poet laureate Stanley Kunitz and arts administrator Elizabeth Kray, Poets House is a national poetry library and literary center. Located in Battery Park City, the 11,000-square-foot space houses a 60,000-volume poetry library, a reading room, an exhibition room, and a children’s room, all free and open to the public. Poets House offers a wide range of literary programming, including readings, talks, panels, performances, poetry workshops, and the annual Poetry Walk Across the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Houston Public Library

The Houston Public Library is a dynamic organization that serves one of the largest service areas—both in population and area—in the United States. The library system is comprised of forty-four public service units including thirty-one Neighborhood Libraries, four Regional Libraries, three Special Collection Libraries, and four Express Libraries, as well as the HPL Mobile Express and a satellite library located at the Children’s Museum of Houston. They host the Houston Public Poetry quarterly reading series and other literary events throughout the year.

Houston Public Library logo

American Poetry Museum

The American Poetry Museum is an outreach museum that serves as a space for exhibitions and education centered on the subject of American poetry. The Museum collects objects centered around American poetry and presents events and educational poetry writing workshops for learners of all ages. The Museum also hosts an annual exhibition each year comprised of art, photography and video about different subject matter using poetry as a tool for discussion.

American Poetry Museum
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Asian American Writers’ Workshop

Established in 1991, AAWW is a national nonprofit arts organization devoted to the creating, publishing, developing, and disseminating of creative writing by Asian Americans. The organization hosts a New York City events series featuring author readings, panels, and discussions, as well as writing workshops and other literary events throughout the year.

Center for Fiction

The Center for Fiction is the only nonprofit literary organization in the United States solely dedicated to celebrating fiction. It features affordable workspace, grants, classes to support emerging writers, reading groups on classic and contemporary authors, and programs to help get kids reading, as well as a circulating library collection of 85,000 titles, a reading room, and an independent fiction bookstore.

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