Southwestern Writers Collection

The Southwestern Writers Collection is located at the Albert B. Alkek Library on the campus of Texas State University in San Marcos, a thirty-minute drive from Austin. Although the more renowned writers in this collection have some connection to Texas or the Southwest, either by birth or their subject matter, their impact extends to American letters.

Detroit Public Library: Main Branch

The Detroit Public Library opened for service on March 25, 1865. The five thousand book collection was located in one room of the old Capitol High School on Griswold Street. The Main Library, a white marble Italian Renaissance style building designed by Cass Gilbert and partially funded by a gift from Andrew Carnegie, opened in 1921. The building offers several spaces open to the public for meetings and events, and the library hosts an author reading series, as well as other literary events.

Detroit Public Library

Houston Public Library

The Houston Public Library is a dynamic organization that serves one of the largest service areas—both in population and area—in the United States. The library system is comprised of forty-four public service units including thirty-one Neighborhood Libraries, four Regional Libraries, three Special Collection Libraries, and four Express Libraries, as well as the HPL Mobile Express and a satellite library located at the Children’s Museum of Houston. They host the Houston Public Poetry quarterly reading series and other literary events throughout the year.

Houston Public Library logo

American Poetry Museum

The American Poetry Museum is an outreach museum that serves as a space for exhibitions and education centered on the subject of American poetry. The Museum collects objects centered around American poetry and presents events and educational poetry writing workshops for learners of all ages. The Museum also hosts an annual exhibition each year comprised of art, photography and video about different subject matter using poetry as a tool for discussion.

American Poetry Museum
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Mechanics’ Institute

The Mechanics’ Institute is a leading cultural center that includes a vibrant library, a world-renowned chess program, and a full calendar of engaging cultural events, including author readings, writing workshops, technology classes, civic discussions, book groups, film screenings, and community gatherings. Founded in 1854 to serve the educational and social needs of mechanics—artisans, craftsmen, and inventors—and their families, the Institute today is a favorite of avid readers, writers, downtown employees, chess players, and the twenty-first-century nomadic worker.

Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum

Inspired by the country’s earliest libraries, often called athenaeums, Folio provides access to discerning private book collections that have been donated, and a home for reading, writing, dialogue, and learning. Public programming includes book-based discussions, readings, presentations of book arts and rare volumes, and musical, cultural, and civic events.

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Woodberry Poetry Room

Woodberry Poetry Room is a special collections reading room and audio-visual archive at Harvard University. The Poetry Room features a circulating collection of twentieth and twenty-first century English-language poetry, an encyclopedic array of poetry journals and literary magazines, a landmark collection of audio recordings (1933 to the present), and the Blue Star collection of rare books, broadsides, chapbooks, typescripts and ephemera.

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Atlanta-Fulton Public Library

The Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System serves as a cultural and intellectual center that enriches the community and empowers all residents with essential tools for lifelong learning. The Central Library, originally designed by Marcel Breuer, has recently been refurbished and includes a modern, fully equipped instructional learning center. The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African-American History and Culture contains one of the foremost collections of African-American literature and historical documents in the nation.

Asian American Writers’ Workshop

Established in 1991, AAWW is a national nonprofit arts organization devoted to the creating, publishing, developing, and disseminating of creative writing by Asian Americans. The organization hosts a New York City events series featuring author readings, panels, and discussions, as well as writing workshops and other literary events throughout the year.

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