Anne LaBastille Memorial Writers Residency

The Adirondack Center for Writing offered a residency from October 4 to October 18 to six poets, fiction writers, or creative nonfiction writers at a lodge on Twitchell Lake in the Adirondack Mountains in New York. Residents were provided with a private room, private bathroom, work space, and all meals. There was no cost to attend the residency, but residents were responsible for travel expenses to and from Twitchell Lake. Using only the online submission system, writers submitted a writing sample of up to 10 pages with a $30 application fee from July 1 to July 15.

Type: 
RESIDENCY
Ignore Event Date Field?: 
yes
Event Date: 
October 28, 2020
Rolling Admissions: 
no
Financial Aid?: 
no
Financial Aid Application Deadline: 
October 28, 2020
Free Admission: 
yes
Contact Information: 

Anne LaBastille Memorial Writers Residency, Adirondack Center for Writing, P.O. Box 956, Saranac Lake, NY 12983. (518) 354-1261. 

Nathalie Thill
Executive Director
Contact City: 
Twitchell Lake
Contact State: 
NY
Contact Zip / Postal Code: 
12983
Country: 
US
Add Image: 

Virginia Center for the Creative Arts

The Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (VCCA) offers residencies of two weeks to two months year-round to poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers at Mt. San Angelo in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Residents are provided with private lodging, work space, and meals, as well as access to the facilities of nearby Sweet Briar College. The residency fee is $150 per day; fellowships and need-based financial aid are available.

Type: 
RESIDENCY
Ignore Event Date Field?: 
yes
Event Date: 
October 28, 2020
Rolling Admissions: 
no
Financial Aid?: 
no
Financial Aid Application Deadline: 
October 28, 2020
Free Admission: 
no
Contact Information: 

Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, 154 San Angelo Drive, Amherst, VA 24521. (434) 946-7236. 

Contact City: 
Amherst
Contact State: 
VA
Contact Zip / Postal Code: 
24521
Country: 
US

Ox-Bow Fall Writers Residency

The Ox-Bow School of Art offered two-, three-, and five-week residencies from September 7 to October 11 to poets, fiction writers, and nonfiction writers on the Ox-Bow campus in Saugatuck, Michigan, located near the shores of Lake Michigan and the Kalamazoo River. Residents were provided with private lodging, work space, and meals. Stipends for travel, supplies, and time away from work were also available. Writers submitted up to 15 pages of poetry or prose, a brief project description, a statement of purpose, a résumé, and contact information for two references by May 2.

Type: 
RESIDENCY
Ignore Event Date Field?: 
yes
Event Date: 
October 28, 2020
Rolling Admissions: 
no
Financial Aid?: 
no
Financial Aid Application Deadline: 
October 28, 2020
Free Admission: 
yes
Contact Information: 

Ox-Bow Fall Writers Residency, Ox-Bow School of Art, 3435 Rupprecht Way, P.O. Box 216, Saugatuck, MI 49453. (269) 857-5811. 

Contact City: 
Saugatuck
Contact State: 
MI
Contact Zip / Postal Code: 
49453
Country: 
US

Upcoming Contest Deadlines

Trick-or-treating may not be on the table this year, but October’s final writing contests may offer their own sweet rewards. Each of these opportunities awards a prize of $1,000 or more, with a deadline of October 31. Good luck!

American Poetry Review Honickman First Book Prize: A prize of $3,000 and publication by American Poetry Review is given annually for a first poetry collection. The winning book is distributed by Copper Canyon Press through Consortium. Ada Limón will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Comstock Review Chapbook Contest: A prize of $1,000, publication by the Comstock Writers Group, and 50 author copies is given annually for a poetry chapbook. Michael McAnaney will judge. Entry fee: $30.

Conduit Books & Ephemera Minds on Fire Open Book Prize: A prize of $1,000, publication by Conduit Books & Ephemera, and 30 author copies is given annually for a book of poetry. The editors will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Elixir Press Poetry Award: A prize of $2,000 and publication by Elixir Press is given annually for a poetry collection. John Nieves will judge. Entry fee: $30.

Finishing Line Press Open Chapbook Competition: A prize of $1,000 and publication by Finishing Line Press is given annually for a poetry chapbook. All entries are considered for publication. Entry fee: $15.

Indiana Review Blue Light Books Prize: A prize of $2,000 and publication by Indiana University Press is given in alternating years for a collection of poetry or a collection of short fiction. The 2021 prize will be awarded in poetry. The winner will also receive travel expenses to read at the 2021 Blue Light Reading in Bloomington, Indiana. Entry fee: $20.

PEN/Faulkner Foundation Award for Fiction: A prize of $15,000 is given annually for a book of fiction published during the current year. Four finalists will each receive $5,000. The winner and finalists will also be invited to read in Washington, D.C., in May 2021. Entry fee: none.

Persea Books Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize: A prize of $1,000 and publication by Persea Books is given annually for a first poetry collection by a woman who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The winner also receives a six-week, all-expenses paid residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center in Umbria, Italy. Entry fee: $30.

Poetry Society of the United Kingdom National Poetry Competition: A prize of £5,000 (approximately $6,350) and publication on the Poetry Society of the United Kingdom website is given annually for a single poem. A second-place prize of £2,000 (approximately $2,540) and a third-place prize of £1,000 (approximately $1,270) are also given. The winners will also be published in Poetry Review. Poems written in English by poets from any country are eligible. Neil Astley, Jonathan Edwards, and Karen McCarthy Woolf will judge. Entry fee: £7 (approximately $9) for one poem, £4 (approximately $5) for each additional poem.

Red Hen Press Benjamin Saltman Poetry Award: A prize of $3,000, publication by Red Hen Press, and a four-week residency at PLAYA in Summer Lake, Oregon, is given annually for a poetry collection. Jeffrey Harrison will judge. Entry fee: $25.

Red Hen Press Quill Prose Award: A prize of $1,000 and publication by Red Hen Press is given annually for a short story collection, a novel, or an essay collection by a queer writer. Amber Flame will judge. Entry fee: $10.

River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize: A prize of $1,000 and publication by University of New Mexico Press is given annually for a book of creative nonfiction. Megan Stielstra will judge. Entry fee: $27.

Tupelo Press Sunken Garden Chapbook Poetry Prize: A prize of $1,000, publication by Tupelo Press, and 25 author copies is given annually for a poetry chapbook. Entry fee: $25.

Tucson Festival of Books Literary Awards: Three prizes of $1,000 each are given annually for works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The winners will also receive scholarships to attend a workshop at the Tucson Festival of Books in March 2021. Entry fee: $20. 

University of North Texas Press Vassar Miller Prize: A prize of $1,000 and publication by University of North Texas Press is given annually for a poetry collection. Entry fee: $25.

Visit the contest websites for complete guidelines, and check out the Grants & Awards database and Submission Calendar for more contests in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

 

 

 

 

Literary Awards

Tucson Festival of Books
Entry Fee: 
$20
Deadline: 
October 31, 2020
Three prizes of $1,000 each are given annually for works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The winners will also receive scholarships to attend a workshop at the Tucson Festival of Books in March 2021. Using only the online submission system, submit five poems of any length or a short story, essay, or excerpt from a novel or memoir of up to 5,000 words with a $20 entry fee by October 31. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Vern Rutsala Book Prize

Cloudbank Books
Entry Fee: 
$25
Deadline: 
November 10, 2020

A prize of $1,000 and publication by Cloudbank Books is given annually for a collection of poetry, flash fiction, or a combination of the two. Christopher Buckley will judge. Submit a manuscript of 60 to 90 pages with a $25 entry fee by November 10. Visit the website for complete guidelines.

N. Scott Momaday With Robert Redford

Caption: 

“I have written somewhere that there is only one story, but there are many stories in the one, and I like that idea.” In this video from PBS’s American Masters series, N. Scott Momaday speaks with Robert Redford about the oral tradition, hearing stories from his father, and the importance of language and story. Momaday’s second memoir, Earth Keeper: Reflections on the American Land (Harper, 2020), is featured in Page One in the November/December issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

Fairy Tale

10.15.20

Sabrina Orah Mark’s Paris Review column Happily features essays inspired by fairy tales and motherhood, including “It’s Time to Pay the Piper,” which reimagines our current reality through the children’s story “The Pied Piper of Hamelin.” Through incantatory sentences and the framing of our reality through a fantastical lens, it asks whether the reason for the pandemic, corrupt leaders, and environmental collapse has a link to the story of the piper, who collects payment by robbing the village of its children. Pick a fairy tale you are familiar or enchanted with and write an essay that uses the structure of that story to explain an event in your life. How do well-known characters and themes help add meaning to the subject matter?

A Shiver

10.8.20

“The cold seemed to have come on all at once, just after lunch, as the teacher and his wife were tranquilly talking over their plans to return to the capital the next day, the second of September, a little later than usual.” At the beginning of Marie NDiaye’s novel That Time of Year (Two Lines Press, 2020), translated from the French by Jordan Stump, a teacher’s wife and son disappear on the day before they are all to return to Paris after spending the summer in a countryside village. The unsettling events and confrontations that follow, as the teacher searches for answers, are a reminder that boundaries are everywhere, between summer and autumn, vacation life and regular life, between those with power and those without. Write a personal essay about an uncertain time in your life when a dramatic event caused a shift. Did you lean into the in-between and search for answers or try to ground yourself and move on?  

My Salinger Year

Caption: 

Joanna Rakoff’s memoir My Salinger Year (Knopf, 2014) has been adapted into a feature film directed by Philippe Falardeau and starring Margaret Qualley and Sigourney Weaver. Set in 1995, an aspiring writer and poet takes a job at a literary agency in New York City that represents the notoriously reclusive J. D. Salinger and handles his fan mail.

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