blogs

Goodbye to Algonquin's Oak Room, E. B. White Answers the ASPCA, and More

by
Evan Smith Rakoff
2.3.12

Melville House wonders when publishers will speak out about Amazon; New York City's Algonquin Hotel announced that when it reopens this spring after a renovation, the famed Oak Room will be gone; E. B. White answers a charge levied by the ASPCA; and more

Litro Magazine

Basic Information
www.litro.co.uk
CC2011_Litro_Live_Logo.png
London
England
n/a
Contact Information
Details
Genres Published: 
Fiction
Formats: 
Web
Print
Charges Reading Fee: 
No
Accepts Electronic Submissions: 
Yes
Accepts Simultaneous Submissions: 
Yes
Accepts Unsolicited Submissions: 
Yes
Payment: 
No payment
Year Founded: 
2005
Representative Authors: 
<p><span style="color: #666666; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 18px; font-size: 12px;">Irvine Welsh, Yiyun Li, Glyn Maxwell, Benjamin Zephaniah, Kele Okereke and Andrew Crumey</span></p>
Issues per Year: 
11
Circulation: 
Greater than 10,000
Subscription Price: 
£17.99 (gbp) for 1 year
Issue Price: 
Free!

We are a high-quality, innovative, literary magazine specializing in short fiction. We publish stories that excite us from new and established writers with strong voices and something to say.

Please don't send poetry, as we publish it on a commissioned basis only. All short-story submissions welcomed! 

Subgenres: 

The Invisible Library

by
Alex Dimitrov
9.1.09
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The Invisible Library, the blog that invites readers to submit the titles of unwritten books they've discovered in their own reading, served as the primary inspiration behind the Invisible Library exhibition, which ran from June 12 to July 12 at the Tenderpixel Gallery in London.

Tags: 

Literary MagNet

by
Kevin Larimer
9.1.08

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Literary Rejections on Display, Rejection Collection, Fence, Virginia Quarterly Review, ZYZZYVA, and Atlas.

Obama’s “Bitter” and the Creative Nonfiction Writer: Postcard From the Campaign Trail

by
Kelly Nuxoll
4.17.08

The origin and form of Mayhill Fowler’s Huffington Post report on Barack Obama’s use of the word “bitter” suggest her work is neither blogging nor journalism, but creative nonfiction. That its effect was out of proportion with its intention begs the question: What can the creative nonfiction writer expect in the Information Age?

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