Washington Irving's Sunnyside

Author Washington Irving designed his Sunnyside home himself, starting in 1835. The grounds reflect Irving's romantic view of art, nature, and history. Visitors can tour the Sunnyside house and gardens with a guide in mid-nineteenth-century dress.

Rowan Oak

Built in 1844, Rowan Oak was the home to William Faulkner and his family for over forty years. The house and its grounds are open to visitors for guided tours, but tour groups are encouraged to make arrangements ahead of time.

Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home

Located in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, the Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home is where the Nobel Prize-winning author spent his early years. The home, which also for a time served as the office of Dr. Lewis' medical practice, has been restored with antiques appropriate to the period.  Many rooms contain items that were known to belong to the Lewis family themselves.  Tours are offered.

The Theodore Roethke Home Museum

Located in Saginaw, Michigan, the Theodore Roethke Home Museum is the childhood home of the Pulitzer Prize winning poet, Theodore Roethke (1908–1963). The Friends of Theodore Roethke Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation whose mission is to promote, preserve, and protect the literary legacy of Theodore Roethke, currently offers tours of the house, along with poetry readings, talks, workshops, and school programs.

Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden

The Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden is a historic landmark located in the green quadrangle at the center of the Springfield Museums and the Springfield City Library. Theodor Seuss Geisel was born in Springfield, and the city is said to have inspired much of his work. His stepdaughter, sculptor Lark Grey Dimond-Cates, created the bronze sculptures of Dr. Seuss and several of his characters, including Horton, the Cat in the Hat, the Grinch, the Storyteller, and the Lorax.

Hours are 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM daily.

William Cullen Bryant Homestead

The William Cullen Bryant Homestead is the boyhood home and later summer residence of William Cullen Bryant. Currently operated by the nonprofit Trustees of Reservations, the homestead is open to the public. Guided tours are available.

The Old Manse

Built in 1770 for patriot minister William Emerson, The Old Manse, a National Historic Landmark, became the center of Concord’s political, literary, and social revolutions over the course of the next century. In the mid-nineteenth-century, leading Transcendentalists such as Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller discussed the issues of the day here, with the Hawthorne and Ripley families.

Longfellow House

Built in 1759 by a wealthy royalist, this house was occupied by Henry W. Longfellow from 1837 to 1882. Previously, the house also served as headquarters for General George Washington during the Siege of Boston, and has seen the company of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, John Hancock, and other revolutionary leaders. The house and grounds are open to the public every day of the year, with special group and student tours available.

Ernest Hemingway Museum in Oak Park

A short walk from the Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Museum, housed inside the Oak Park Arts Center, the Ernest Hemingway Museum is host to permanent and temporary exhibits that explore the author's life. Kiosks fashioned from historic doors hold exhibits of rare photos and artifacts. Special exhibits highlight Hemingway's love of nature and the arts, along with his involvement in both World Wars and the movies. A museum bookshop features books by and about the author, gift items, videos, and posters. Guided tours are available.

Casa Genotta

Located within the resort community of Sea Island, Georgia, this landmark was once home to American playwright Eugene O'Neill and his wife, Carlotta. O'Neill was the first American to introduce realism, which was associated with Anton Chekhov, into dramatic tragedy. He was also one of the first playwrights to incorporate speeches using the American vernacular. O'Neill won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama three times in his lifetime, for Beyond the Horizon (1920), Anna Christie (1922), and Strange Interlude (1928).

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