O. Henry House

This house was home to William Sidney Porter, better known as the short story writer O. Henry, in 1885. Today the O. Henry House is a museum open to the public.  

Katherine Anne Porter Literary Center

Located in Kyle, Texas, the Katherine Anne Porter Literary Center is a three-room house that served as the author's residence from her birth in 1890 to her death in 1902. The center hosts a Katherine Anne Porter Young Writers program, a Visiting Writers Series, and a reading series.

O. Henry Museum

Located in Austin, Texas, the O. Henry Museum houses artifacts and archival material related to William Sidney Porter, better known as short story writer O. Henry. Programs include Lunchtime Lit, a monthly free reading and discussion series about the author's works.

Alex Haley House Museum

Located in Henning, Tennessee, the Alex Haley House Museum is where the Pulitzer Prize-winning author lived from 1921 to 1929. Today the Alex Haley House Museum has been restored to model the home as it was when Haley was born. Some of the 1919 furniture which decorates the home belonged to the Haley family. The restored building is open to the public as a museum featuring Haley’s work, childhood memorabilia and references to the people who inspired his characters in Roots.

Pearl S. Buck House

This sixty-eight-acre estate in Perkasie, Pennsylvania, was home to Pearl S. Buck from 1935 to her death in 1973. Visitors are invited to tour the Pearl S. Buck House and its grounds through the first-person memories collected from community members who lived and worked with Pearl S. Buck and her husband, Richard Walsh, and their family. There is also a gift shop on the grounds that contains Asian-inspired gifts, selections of Buck's books, and more.

Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site

Edgar Allan Poe lived in Philadelphia for around six years, and he spent his last year in the city living in this red brick building with his wife, Virginia, and his mother-in-law, Maria Clemm. Of Poe's several homes in Philadelphia, only this one survives. Today, it is admiinistered by the National Park Service. Visitors can tour the three-story home, which includes exhibits on Poe's family and literary life and a theater showing a short film on the author.

Washington Irving Monument

This monument was erected and donated to the public by Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel Norman Wright to commemorate the visit of the great author to this locality on October 14, 1832, in company with a party of U. S. Rangers from Cantonment Gibson. They camped that night about thirteen miles west of this point, near the present town of Wekiwa.

Sequoyah's Cabin

Sequoyah built this one-room log cabin in 1829 shortly after moving to Oklahoma. The cabin became the property of the Oklahoma Historical Society in 1936, and the cabin was enclosed in a stone cover building as a project of the Works Progress Administration. In 1966 the Secretary of the Interior designated the site as a National Historic Landmark.

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site

Carl Sandburg and his family lived in this house from 1945 until Sandburg's death in 1967. Today, National Park Service Rangers or park volunteer guides offer tours through the writer's house. Visitors can also drop in on the bookstore, which offers a broad selection of Sandburg's works.

Thomas Wolfe Memorial

Known as "Dixieland" in Look Homeward, Angel, the historic Old Kentucky Home boarding house in Asheville was home to Thomas Wolfe for ten years. Though the house suffered extensive damage in a fire in 1998, it was renovated and reopened to the public in 2004. Today, a modern visitor center is located at 52 North Market Street, directly behind the historic Old Kentucky Home boarding house. The facility houses an exhibit hall featuring personal effects from the Wolfe family home, Wolfe's New York City apartment, and his father's stonecutting shop.

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