Emily Sieu Liebowitz Recommends...

“Someone—a teacher of mine, though I am not sure who—told me that once you know what you’re doing in writing, you have to give up and move on. In major moments of writer’s block, I think of that advice and how writing from a sudden moment of loss or blankness is part of the vocation; how not knowing is such an important part, even central to language and what it can accomplish. And though it is important to understand the workings of writing and deploy its techniques and tools, it is equally important to remember that the writer is sometimes a seer, an adherent, or a conjurer. A writer must endure not knowing in order to discover. From a practical standpoint, when I feel lost, I continue writing and reading. I return to my heroes to remind me of what I love in poetry, favorite books from my early poetry education—Stéphane Mallarmé’s Un Coup De Dés Jamais N’abolira Le Hasard, Robert Duncan’s The Opening of the Field, Amiri Baraka’s Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note—to give me the courage to keep recording what I see and hear.”
—Emily Sieu Liebowitz, author of National Park (Gramma Press, 2018)