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Occupy Wall Street Library Reported Destroyed, Michael Chabon in Singapore, and More

Daily News

Online Only, posted 11.15.11

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today's stories:

In an early morning raid, Mayor Bloomberg and the NYPD evicted Occupy Wall Street protestors encamped at Zuccotti Park, reportedly destroying the volunteer library, which held 5,554 books. (GalleyCat)

Yesterday was the 160th anniversary of the publication of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. When Moby-Dick, Melville's sixth book, was published, the author was thirty-two and only five years into his career. According to scholar Steve King, the brightest moment in Melville's writing life was just before critics reviewed his great novel. (Barnes and Noble Review)

One of the revelations that have surfaced since the publication of Walter Isaacson's biography, Steve Jobs, is that the late inventor had a relationship in 1983 with a young writer named Jennifer Egan, who challenged the Apple CEO's "Zen credo of nonattachment with his life’s work making highly covetable electronics." (92Y Blog)

The Walt Disney Company has reportedly purchased Babble Media for over forty million dollars. Babble is a literary-leaning parenting website, which hosts hundreds of blogs, including those by writers Steve Almond and Samantha Bee. (New York Times)

PopMatters interviews John Wesley Harding, musician, writer, ex-patriot, and founder of the continually sold-out ensemble performances, John Wesley Harding's Cabinet of Wonders.

If you're curious about how a young, literary editor in New York City spends her week, read Sadie Stein's Culture Diary on the Paris Review Daily.

In Singapore to present a lecture at the 2011 Singapore Writers Festival, the Wall Street Journal interviews Pulitzer-prize winning novelist Michael Chabon. "Mothers are right—you can’t really make a living from writing."

Columbia Pictures is in final discussions to purchase screen rights to Evan Mandery's novel Q, with filmmaker David Gordon Greene attached.

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