Erika L. Sánchez

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“Every day after school, the factory men yell / mamacita, /​ make noises like sucking /​ mangos.” ​Erika L. Sánchez reads the poem “Hija de la Chingada” from her debut poetry collection, Lessons on Expulsion (Graywolf Press, 2017), for the Palabra Pura bilingual reading series. The collection is featured in Page One in the July/August issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

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The Illusion of Safety/The Safety of Illusion

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Roxane Gay reads part of “The Illusion of Safety/The Safety of Illusion” from her essay collection, Bad Feminist (Harper Perennial, 2014). Her debut memoir, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body (Harper, 2017), is featured in Page One in the July/August issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

The Gypsy Moth Summer

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“The first summer fair of the season, the East Avalon Fair, was a ‘coming out’ party for everyone on the eastern tip of the island.” Julia Fierro reads from a draft of her novel The Gypsy Moth Summer (St. Martin’s Press, 2017), which is featured in Page One in the July/August issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, for the Why There Are Words reading series.

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Life on Mars

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"My interest in science fiction was really based in what now seems like a very kitschy futuristic aesthetic—an image of the future from about forty years ago." Poet Tracy K. Smith discusses how she conducted research for her Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Life on Mars (Graywolf Press, 2011). Smith, whose new book, the memoir Ordinary Light, is forthcoming from Knopf, is featured in the March/April issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

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Self-Portrait as Mae West Anagram

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“I’m no moaning bluet, mountable / linnet, mumbling nun. I’m / tangible, I’m gin. Able to molt / in toto, to limn.” Paisley Rekdal, who was named the new Utah state poet laureate in May 2017, recites her poem “Self-Portrait as Mae West Anagram” for the Utah Division of Arts and Museums. 

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Safiya Sinclair

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“This poem ‘Home’ is not only talking about ‘home,’ a physical place. It’s also talking about language as a home which I feel exiled from.” Safiya Sinclair, author of the debut collection Cannibal (University of Nebraska Press, 2016) and winner of a 2016 Whiting Award for poetry, reads from “Home” and talks about the multiple languages and places that inhabit her poems.

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