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ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Jan 14, 2010, 11:23 AM

Post #801 of 1018 (17914 views)
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     Re: [Junior Maas] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  


In Reply To
Show your friends Noah Baumbach's Mr. Jealousy. Eric Stotlz might help legitmize your decision.



I'm not sure it would work. Most of my friends are engineers.


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


__________



Jan 15, 2010, 1:08 AM

Post #802 of 1018 (17793 views)
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     Re: [ericweinstein] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Do it! Do it now!

I'm telling you, film has a legitimizing effect. I'm not sure if you've seen it, but in the beginning, Stoltz is kind of puttering around, being a sub, only thinking about writing. Then at the end, in the getting-it-all-together montage, it shows him walking around "the prestigious" Iowa Writer's Workshop. My friends were like, Ooh, the prestigious Iowa Writer's Workshop. Could be something to that!

(One of them's an engineer).

;)


six five four three two one 0 ->

(This post was edited by Junior Maas on Jan 15, 2010, 1:11 AM)


taraberyl



Jan 17, 2010, 1:01 AM

Post #803 of 1018 (17650 views)
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     Re: [Junior Maas] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

I watched that film just recently! Of course the bits about his writing career were my favorite aspect.

Quick question to all:
Anyone know if any of Seth's other lists are ever going to be reposted? I'm thinking of the more detailed ones regarding (1) funding and (2) class sizes. The programs are even evasive about things like class sizes! And Tom's book doesn't really go into it, specifically.


NickMcRae
Nick McRae

e-mail user

Jan 17, 2010, 4:44 AM

Post #804 of 1018 (17635 views)
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     Re: [taraberyl] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

I believe Seth said a while back that they would be reposted sometime in February.

Cheers!

NM


"You got a song, man, sing it. / You got a bell, man, ring it." - Robert Creeley

Nick McRae
nmcrae1@gmail.com
http://nickmcrae.com/


Zuleika Dobson


e-mail user

Jan 23, 2010, 10:59 PM

Post #805 of 1018 (17397 views)
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     Re: [Junior Maas] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Junior, I finally saw the movie today... quite good, though they actually call it "the reputable Iowa Writers' Workshop" (would have preferred "prestigious). I found it very confusing, however, when his classmates compliment him on the play he wrote, since the Iowa Playwrights Workshop is completely separate, falling under the Theatre department...


"Every spectator is a coward or a traitor."


lostleaf


Feb 27, 2010, 12:09 PM

Post #806 of 1018 (16814 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [Pedro Eler] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

hi, I'm an international applicant as well, I'm from China. I will be applying this year, right now I'm preparing my writing samples and other stuff. Isn't it true that because international applicants are so rare that their acceptances should be proportionally higher?


writer's block, http://lostleaf328.blogbus.com


hansenma


Feb 28, 2010, 10:11 PM

Post #807 of 1018 (16704 views)
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     Re: [lostleaf] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

It'd be nice to hope that any sort of extenuating circumstance would make you a better candidate - but the truth of it is that it all comes down to the manuscript. Period. If they don't like your writing, they don't care where your'e from, what you've been through, or what school you went to. It's all about what you can do with a story/poem/essay. Good luck!


lostleaf


Feb 28, 2010, 10:29 PM

Post #808 of 1018 (16693 views)
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     Re: [hansenma] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Thanks for the brutal truth, I've realized that much myself as well. I guess what makes it so difficult is that it's really not a very objective choice; you'd have to know how to please someone you don't know, and that might not get you anywhere. So I should probably just stay who I am and give my best shot!


writer's block, http://lostleaf328.blogbus.com


hansenma


Feb 28, 2010, 11:43 PM

Post #809 of 1018 (16663 views)
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     Re: [lostleaf] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

The good news is that you have TONS of time to prepare. Plan ahead, stay organized, keep writing, and pick up a copy of the MFA Handbook by Tom Kealy. I bought mine off Amazon. It was my bible throughout the whole, crazy application process.


lostleaf


Mar 1, 2010, 12:14 AM

Post #810 of 1018 (16650 views)
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     Re: [hansenma] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Thanks a lot for the advice!


writer's block, http://lostleaf328.blogbus.com


llstanle
Lesley

e-mail user

Mar 1, 2010, 1:36 PM

Post #811 of 1018 (16568 views)
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     Re: [hansenma] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Anyone have a good, organized system for making a list of schools you want to apply to? looking to narrow down my list and include deadline, funding package, special experience i'm interested in, etc. as i started one on blank textedit file, i figured there was a better way to do this. can anyone help? please?


jlgwriter
Jeanne Lyet Gassman
e-mail user

Mar 1, 2010, 1:50 PM

Post #812 of 1018 (16552 views)
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     Re: [llstanle] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Hmm... Try creating an Excel spreadsheet. You can create a row for each school:

Name of school

Then create columns for each school listing:
Contact info (address, email, phone number, people, etc.)
Application requirements and deadline
Funding Info
Special notes
Application Status

Does that help?

Jeanne
http://www.jeannelyetgassman.com
http://jeannelyetgassman.blogspot.com


http://www.jeannelyetgassman.com
http://jeannelyetgassman.blogspot.com


Pedro Eler


Mar 1, 2010, 3:56 PM

Post #813 of 1018 (16497 views)
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     Re: [lostleaf] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

As someone else said before, it ALL boils down to the manuscript. So work really hard on that, and don't wais a single minute wondering if the people who will read it will like it, just send what YOU think is your bets work and what best represents you and wait for the best. I still have to go through the whole process of the GRE and the TOEFL, and also finishing my manuscript. But what scares me the most about the whole process are the letter of recommendation. I'm finding it nearly impossible to have three people write that for me since here in Brazil professor just don't care enough to write recommendations... because it's not something that colleges and universities require here. So, I'm in trouble with that... if anyone has some good piece of advice I would be really grateful! LOL

Best of luck to all of us who are applying at the end of the year. The process is long but it has started already, so here we go...


Pedro Eler


Mar 1, 2010, 4:00 PM

Post #814 of 1018 (16492 views)
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     Re: [lostleaf] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

And lostleaf, I think it would be really great if maybe we could exchange manuscripts, just so we could read each other's stuff and say what we think... I mean, feedback is a very important thing to make sure that you have a good solid manuscript. So, what do you think? My email adress is: pedrocinefilo@hotmail.com

Actually, anyone interested in doing the same can send me an email, and I would be very happy to read some of what you guys are writing and hear from you critics on what I'm writing.

Anyway, let me know...


lostleaf


Mar 2, 2010, 9:28 AM

Post #815 of 1018 (16393 views)
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     Re: [Pedro Eler] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  

Hi, Pedro
What you said is absolutely right. I'm working on my manuscript as well, and I have TOEFL to take in May. I hope you will find a solution to your recommendation letter problem, and good luck to both of us!
I think it's good idea to share our works; I haven't had anything done yet, but will send you one when i finish. I'll also give you my email, so if you have anything to share, i'd like to read as well.
chenchen328@gmail.com


writer's block, http://lostleaf328.blogbus.com


Pedro Eler


Mar 2, 2010, 1:27 PM

Post #816 of 1018 (16333 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [lostleaf] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) - International Applicants [In reply to]  


In Reply To
Hi, Pedro
What you said is absolutely right. I'm working on my manuscript as well, and I have TOEFL to take in May. I hope you will find a solution to your recommendation letter problem, and good luck to both of us!
I think it's good idea to share our works; I haven't had anything done yet, but will send you one when i finish. I'll also give you my email, so if you have anything to share, i'd like to read as well.
chenchen328@gmail.com



dylj


Mar 2, 2010, 8:09 PM

Post #817 of 1018 (16273 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [motet] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) [In reply to]  

For those looking for another forum format (where you can make your own topics!) for discussing MFA ...

http://yxnstat.com

I present Discuss MFA.

Join and introduce yourself if you feel so inclined!


Forum Apps


Mar 3, 2010, 4:59 PM

Post #818 of 1018 (16117 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [dylj] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) [In reply to]  

I’m currently considering offers from both LSU and Minnesota in poetry. I have my own thoughts about these programs (in regards to faculty and the like) but I thought I’d post here to see if anyone else has any thoughts. You can also e-mail me at [aaronaapps [at] yahoo.com]. For me, its a tough choice.


Best,
Aaron


Coconut Joe



Mar 3, 2010, 5:16 PM

Post #819 of 1018 (16107 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [Forum Apps] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) [In reply to]  


In Reply To
I’m currently considering offers from both LSU and Minnesota in poetry. I have my own thoughts about these programs (in regards to faculty and the like) but I thought I’d post here to see if anyone else has any thoughts. You can also e-mail me at [aaronaapps [at] yahoo.com]. For me, its a tough choice.


Best,
Aaron


Ask Seth. He can help you.


ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Mar 3, 2010, 9:04 PM

Post #820 of 1018 (16040 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [Coconut Joe] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) [In reply to]  


In Reply To
Ask Seth. He can help you.



For some reason, this makes me imagine Seth as Ben Kenobi.


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


umass76


Mar 3, 2010, 10:30 PM

Post #821 of 1018 (16005 views)
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     Re: [In reply to]  

Hi Aaron,

I think Minnesota has it all over Louisiana State -- and this has nothing whatsoever to do with rankings. Minnesota is a larger (by 300% to 400%) and thus presumptively more dynamic writing community (relatively speaking only) that historically excels in three genres rather than two (LSU does offer screenwriting and nonfiction but is not known for these; UM is a true "triple-threat" [as it were] and allows students to work across genres), located in a city regularly rated as among the best five in America in which to be an artist or merely a literate personally generally. This means more readings, (many) more publishers and thus internship opportunities, not to mention more cultural happenings generally (cf. the burgeoning music scene in Minneapolis and the fact that most indie tours pass through; professional sports; &c); Baton Rouge has its attractions, but they are not these and that city is simply not Minneapolis (and wouldn't claim to be). Baton Rouge is not New Orleans--I know you know, but this really has to be kept in mind.

The major poetry-related institutions @ LSU are The Southern Review, whose funding has been gutted, and The New Delta Review, which is a modest operation, and LSU Press, which publishes the Walt Whitman Award (as is our euphemistic way of saying It Is Mainstream-Conservative). Obviously the weather is at opposite poles, though I'm guessing if you had a strong aversion to cold or heat you wouldn't have applied to these schools and/or, having applied, you would find yourself so substantially drawn to one over the other as to practically have that make the decision for you--those of us for whom weather is a big issue generally see it as truly a central one. The most interesting poet on the faculty of either program is probably Lara Glenum at LSU--but she is a newly-minted professor, and aesthetics do not determine pedagogy, so it's tough not to see Gonzalez and Hampl as being safer bets from a mentorship standpoint (at least until Lara gets her sea-legs; mind you, she may have them already, but behind Rawls' "veil of ignorance" we simply make choices based on what we know). (I am a huge Andrei Codrescu fan, but he appears not to teach at LSU anymore, not even adjunct.) Minnesota's reputation is far more established, which actually is not a way of working the rankings into this discussion but rather a way of saying that the high degree of student satisfaction generally reported out of that program has a longer trail behind it and therefore is less likely to be a transient phenomenon. LSU deserves its present esteem but do remember what percentage of that esteem is funding- rather than curriculum-based.

The percentage of total faculty in your field is telling: Minnesota is 44% poetry faculty and several of its most well-known faculty are poets; LSU is 33% poetry faculty and its poets are less well-known. LSU is the home of The New Criticism, in many respects, and as you know The New Criticism is much reviled by many of today's most innovative poets, an important note if you see yourself as, or aim to be, an innovator in your field; whatever one's view, LSU presents as a program supportive of--and advertising itself to--a conservative base of artists, its hiring of extremely interesting "gurlesque" poet Lara Glenum notwithstanding (i.e., it's a start, but only a start, however much I love The Hounds of No and Maximum Gaga). In contrast Minneapolis is a hotbed of innovation in the arts, in publishing, in music, in politics. A degree from Minnesota may have more institutional cache, to the extent this matters, owing (as is so often the case with these things) to the undergraduate program's reputation exceeding that of LSU; likewise, if you wanted to stay on at Minnesota for a humanities Ph.D. e.g. in English (if being there were to give you some advantage in such application, as it does not always) Minnesota's is the far stronger English Department per the NRC, USN&WR, really everyone. Minnesota also has state grants available only to Minnesota poets, which grants help fund Milkweed Editions and have made that press's publication of nearly 1 (on average) graduating MFA poet/year basically a tradition -- meaning that on graduation you quite possibly have a chance of coming away with a book contract as well, a correlation between program and publishing house no other program in America (to my knowledge) can offer. And Milkweed, like Coffee House, like Graywolf, is a major publisher in your genre.

Because Minnesota's MFA literary magazine (Dislocate) is much less established than LSU's, you may actually have a much better opportunity at the former to become an integral part of their operations right away if this interests you. The teaching load is light at both LSU and Minnesota but the latter assures you of the opportunity to teach creative writing--this matters from both a career development standpoint as well as the fact that it's simply a more enjoyable subject (in the view of most poets) to teach. And, yes, easier (strictly from a temperamental standpoint, I mean; writers are "always already" [excuse the Althusser-speak] in the imaginative space being a writing teacher requires). The cost of living is average to low in both places; Minnesota is ranked lower than LSU in funding in part because Minnesota does not release stipend data--as an admitted student, however, you should now be in a position to request and receive that data and make comparisons directly between the two programs (something pending applicants, generally, can only estimate).

Minnesota must be considered the stronger cohort (behind the "veil of ignorance"), as it publishes its acceptance rate prominently and it is quite low. LSU is one of the only top 50 programs not to publish its admissions data and this is cause for concern (albeit a responsible and not undue concern). Minneapolis gives you more ready access, by car, to cities a) of general interest to writers (Iowa City, Madison, Chicago), and b) where many post-MFA employment and fellowship opportunities exist (Columbia College residency in poetry, Wisconsin Institute of Creative Writing; &c), and c) for interesting road-trips during your three years on campus.

I could go on, but I got 75 minutes of sleep last night (literally) and need to go to bed. Of course I should add that LSU is a fantastic program and you can't really go wrong here; I simply think Minnesota is the superior option exclusive of any personal considerations you may be bringing to the table (e.g., a relationship, a strong weather preference, closeness of family, a preference for Southern rather than Midwestern culture, a preference for LSU's "averaged" center-right politics [mild college progressives averaged with Neo-Confederates; and yes, a very close friend of mine is an LSU grad so I'm not guessing with that second assignation] over Minnesota's neo-hippies and labor-Dems; a preference for Southern cuisine over the basic meat [steak] and dairy [cheese] products popular in the Midwest; a particular interest in screenwriting; &c &c).

But hey -- I don't really know about MFA programs, so take all this with a grain of salt. I'm mainly a survey guy when I'm fully awake.

Best of luck, and congratulations on your acceptances!

Be well,
Seth


umass76


Mar 3, 2010, 10:31 PM

Post #822 of 1018 (16004 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [In reply to]  

Hi Aaron,

I think Minnesota has it all over Louisiana State -- and this has nothing whatsoever to do with rankings. Minnesota is a larger (by 300% to 400%) and thus presumptively more dynamic writing community (relatively speaking only) that historically excels in three genres rather than two (LSU does offer screenwriting and nonfiction but is not known for these; UM is a true "triple-threat" [as it were] and allows students to work across genres), located in a city regularly rated as among the best five in America in which to be an artist or merely a literate personally generally. This means more readings, (many) more publishers and thus internship opportunities, not to mention more cultural happenings generally (cf. the burgeoning music scene in Minneapolis and the fact that most indie tours pass through; professional sports; &c); Baton Rouge has its attractions, but they are not these and that city is simply not Minneapolis (and wouldn't claim to be). Baton Rouge is not New Orleans--I know you know, but this really has to be kept in mind.

The major poetry-related institutions @ LSU are The Southern Review, whose funding has been gutted, and The New Delta Review, which is a modest operation, and LSU Press, which publishes the Walt Whitman Award (as is our euphemistic way of saying It Is Mainstream-Conservative). Obviously the weather is at opposite poles, though I'm guessing if you had a strong aversion to cold or heat you wouldn't have applied to these schools and/or, having applied, you would find yourself so substantially drawn to one over the other as to practically have that make the decision for you--those of us for whom weather is a big issue generally see it as truly a central one. The most interesting poet on the faculty of either program is probably Lara Glenum at LSU--but she is a newly-minted professor, and aesthetics do not determine pedagogy, so it's tough not to see Gonzalez and Hampl as being safer bets from a mentorship standpoint (at least until Lara gets her sea-legs; mind you, she may have them already, but behind Rawls' "veil of ignorance" we simply make choices based on what we know). (I am a huge Andrei Codrescu fan, but he appears not to teach at LSU anymore, not even adjunct.) Minnesota's reputation is far more established, which actually is not a way of working the rankings into this discussion but rather a way of saying that the high degree of student satisfaction generally reported out of that program has a longer trail behind it and therefore is less likely to be a transient phenomenon. LSU deserves its present esteem but do remember what percentage of that esteem is funding- rather than curriculum-based.

The percentage of total faculty in your field is telling: Minnesota is 44% poetry faculty and several of its most well-known faculty are poets; LSU is 33% poetry faculty and its poets are less well-known. LSU is the home of The New Criticism, in many respects, and as you know The New Criticism is much reviled by many of today's most innovative poets, an important note if you see yourself as, or aim to be, an innovator in your field; whatever one's view, LSU presents as a program supportive of--and advertising itself to--a conservative base of artists, its hiring of extremely interesting "gurlesque" poet Lara Glenum notwithstanding (i.e., it's a start, but only a start, however much I love The Hounds of No and Maximum Gaga). In contrast Minneapolis is a hotbed of innovation in the arts, in publishing, in music, in politics. A degree from Minnesota may have more institutional cache, to the extent this matters, owing (as is so often the case with these things) to the undergraduate program's reputation exceeding that of LSU; likewise, if you wanted to stay on at Minnesota for a humanities Ph.D. e.g. in English (if being there were to give you some advantage in such application, as it does not always) Minnesota's is the far stronger English Department per the NRC, USN&WR, really everyone. Minnesota also has state grants available only to Minnesota poets, which grants help fund Milkweed Editions and have made that press's publication of nearly 1 (on average) graduating MFA poet/year basically a tradition -- meaning that on graduation you quite possibly have a chance of coming away with a book contract as well, a correlation between program and publishing house no other program in America (to my knowledge) can offer. And Milkweed, like Coffee House, like Graywolf, is a major publisher in your genre.

Because Minnesota's MFA literary magazine (Dislocate) is much less established than LSU's, you may actually have a much better opportunity at the former to become an integral part of their operations right away if this interests you. The teaching load is light at both LSU and Minnesota but the latter assures you of the opportunity to teach creative writing--this matters from both a career development standpoint as well as the fact that it's simply a more enjoyable subject (in the view of most poets) to teach. And, yes, easier (strictly from a temperamental standpoint, I mean; writers are "always already" [excuse the Althusser-speak] in the imaginative space being a writing teacher requires). The cost of living is average to low in both places; Minnesota is ranked lower than LSU in funding in part because Minnesota does not release stipend data--as an admitted student, however, you should now be in a position to request and receive that data and make comparisons directly between the two programs (something pending applicants, generally, can only estimate).

Minnesota must be considered the stronger cohort (behind the "veil of ignorance"), as it publishes its acceptance rate prominently and it is quite low. LSU is one of the only top 50 programs not to publish its admissions data and this is cause for concern (albeit a responsible and not undue concern). Minneapolis gives you more ready access, by car, to cities a) of general interest to writers (Iowa City, Madison, Chicago), and b) where many post-MFA employment and fellowship opportunities exist (Columbia College residency in poetry, Wisconsin Institute of Creative Writing; &c), and c) for interesting road-trips during your three years on campus.

I could go on, but I got 75 minutes of sleep last night (literally) and need to go to bed. Of course I should add that LSU is a fantastic program and you can't really go wrong here; I simply think Minnesota is the superior option exclusive of any personal considerations you may be bringing to the table (e.g., a relationship, a strong weather preference, closeness of family, a preference for Southern rather than Midwestern culture, a preference for LSU's "averaged" center-right politics [mild college progressives averaged with Neo-Confederates; and yes, a very close friend of mine is an LSU grad so I'm not guessing with that second assignation] over Minnesota's neo-hippies and labor-Dems; a preference for Southern cuisine over the basic meat [steak] and dairy [cheese] products popular in the Midwest; a particular interest in screenwriting; &c &c).

But hey -- I don't really know about MFA programs, so take all this with a grain of salt. I'm mainly a survey guy when I'm fully awake.

Best of luck, and congratulations on your acceptances!

Be well,
Seth


Reaper16


Mar 3, 2010, 11:19 PM

Post #823 of 1018 (15974 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [Forum Apps] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) & (2010) [In reply to]  

In addition to what Seth said: Minneapolis has an ever-growing, vibrant food scene. The Vietnamese places in the Twin Cities are killer. Plus Minneapolis has the very best independent hip hop scene in the world. The Twin Cities are host to the super-influential label Rhymesayers Entertainment as well as the Doomtree collective. Which is to say, I would have taken Minnesota's offer in a nanosecond were I offered a place in their program (I wasn't but whatev).


Forum Apps


Mar 3, 2010, 11:56 PM

Post #824 of 1018 (15955 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [umass76] Re: [In reply to]  

Seth,
Thanks so much for taking the time to write all of that. And hello fellow Wisconsin resident! (Although I live on a farm, so you’re like a pseudo-Wisconsin-resident, clearly, by comparison… heh).

Ah, I was leaning toward LSU before you posted this and now I have decision angst again. In case you need this for something LSU does guarantee that admitted students will get an opportunity to teach creative writing (as well as opportunities to teach literature). That much I did learn on the phone. I’ll query them about selectivity data (unless you already have and they were stubborn about it?).

Lara Glenum is just so exciting. I would have applied to Notre Dame, too, if they had more funding. So, you basically read into why I was conflicted quite well. I will say that Laura Mullen isn’t a traditional/conservative poet either. I’m not that familiar with Rodger Kamentz, although he seems like the most established/famous writer in the program. I spent most of my time as an undergraduate studying Asian history, and my mentor/friend Dan Beachy-Quick wrote me a recommendation (so I can see why he might be interested in working with me as well, I suppose with his interest in the intersection of Judaism and Buddhism, I guess, although I’m not Jewish…). They definitely made me feel welcome in the phone call (and I honestly think I was one of their top, if not their top choice based on the phone call and the fact that no one else has received a call from the program since… they basically said that the faculty met and I was a unanimous choice between them). Considering that part of my writing sample was from a collection that was accepted by BlazeVox (which fell through, eh, small presses) they surely are open to innovation. I just made if off of the wait-list at Minnesota and the phone call was kind of take it or leave it. That was somewhat disheartening. That said, making my decision based on how a phone call went is stupid.


Was your friend in the MFA program? Which genre? I can see if they were in the English program proper (to be honest it is somewhat blasé, so I can see why you’d say that… there are a couple of people in the philosophy department that really excite me that I think makes up for it though).

I actually do have an interest in screenwriting too (and I applied to film theory programs on top of MFA programs, but was denied from both Brown’s MCM and Berkeley Rhetoric).

So, already knowing that Minnesota has quite the tradition and some of my favorite presses and so on and so forth which I think you already elucidated quite well so I’m not going to go through it again (most of my family lives in the twin cities, too, so then there is that leaning me towards UMN) I was still left conflicted.

I think the things you pointed out about the lack of information about funding and the lack of selectivity data are actually pretty important to my decision. Thanks for pointing that out. Didn’t even know that the UMN number in your rankings might be off (or not up to date necessarily). Here is another question for you… what are the “placement rankings” based off of? I see that Minnesota is ranked fairly high. Is that something I should be worried about? Does it really matter?

Thanks for all the help.

Best,
Aaron


Coconut Joe



Mar 4, 2010, 12:20 PM

Post #825 of 1018 (15882 views)
Shortcut
     Re: [Forum Apps] Re: [In reply to]  

Aaron, always think about life after the MFA. The southern hospitality can disappear any minute once you've arrived there, so I wouldn't pay much attention to the tone of the phone calls you've received from the two schools. It should be more about what you're going to or want to do there than what they can do for you. Always think about the reputation of each English Ph.D. program if you plan to go on to Ph.D. programs after getting an MFA. I think LSU is an unranked English Ph.D. program and Minnesota is in the second tier. UMN's well known for its cultural studies program. An MFA from UMN will look a lot better if you plan to apply again to interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs like Berkeley's Rhetoric or Brown's MCM.

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