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fuzen


Apr 6, 2007, 6:55 PM

Post #151 of 2090 (19867 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

This is just going off of general vibes/understanding, but Nebraska strikes me as a school that takes creative writing quite seriously. They have Prairie Schooner and a sizeable creative writing faculty that includes Ted Kooser, one of the biggest names in contemporary poetry.

Some schools do put more emphasis on literature - you can tell which just by whether they require the GRE Lit test or not - but to be honest, if you're going to be doing a PhD, you'll have to show you can do literature regardless. Otherwise it wouldn't be a PhD, right?

There aren't so many PhD CW programs that you can't at least look up each of their web sites and read what they have to say. Giving a call on the phone also wouldn't hurt. Hawaii offers tremendous flexibility with your creative writing dissertation, but it'd be hard to figure out just from looking at the site. (You can even do genre fiction there, if you want to, which you almost never find anywhere.) But yeah, look up all the programs. There aren't that many. We can probably compile a list right here if we need to.

If you do decide early on that you will be applying to schools that require the GRE Lit, you need to start studying for that pretty much now, if not two years ago. Ultimately it comes down to your writing sample, but if you're like me, you take pride in all aspects of the application and you'll want to show them something decent. Many people decide early on they will apply only to schools that don't require the GRE Lit.

By the way, advertisements in Writer's Chronicle and P&W aren't necessarily a good indicator, either. For instance, Iowa doesn't advertise its program. USC doesn't advertise its program. I don't recall seeing one for Houston either. Some schools just don't feel like they need to advertise.

gcsumfa, FSU is a school that doesn't even require a scholarly writing sample. I think it's entirely focused on creative writing, and they have wonderful faculty - please don't let poor stationery deter you from applying. For what it's worth, the acceptance letter was also in multiple fonts, folded into three sections plus an extra sliver at the top, without a signature and on very thin paper. With tape across the back, and a stamp on the return address corner. Blame the administrators, not the creative process that goes on there.


(edited to correct glaring errors no self-respecting writer could stand to look at)


(This post was edited by fuzen on Apr 6, 2007, 8:10 PM)


gcsumfa


Apr 6, 2007, 7:31 PM

Post #152 of 2090 (19859 views)
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Re: [fuzen] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Fuzen, great post…hopefully this thread stays at the top of the board for awhile;)


In Reply To
This is just going off of general vibes/understanding, but Nebraska strikes me as a school that takes creative writing quite seriously. They have Prairie Schooner and a sizeable creative writing faculty that includes Ted Kooser, one of the biggest names in contemporary poetry.


True, good points. But has anyone heard of anyone being accepted by NU this year? I know of several people who applied, and they were all rejected. Just wondering.


In Reply To
Some schools do put more emphasis on literature - you can tell which just by whether they require the GRE Lit test or not - but to be honest, if you're going to be doing a PhD, you'll have to show you can do literature regardless. Otherwise it wouldn't be a PhD, right?


I really don’t think the GRE LIT measures one’s background in LIT more than it measures how well one might function at a cocktail party. For instance, ETS states that many of the questions are “critical reading” questions, when in fact 99% of the questions are like answering Trivia Pursuit questions, not “critical reading” questions.


In Reply To
By the way, advertisements in Writer's Chronicle and P&W aren't necessarily a good indicator, either. For instance, Iowa doesn't advertise its program. USC doesn't advertise its program. I don't recall seeing one for Houston either. Some schools just don't feel like they need to advertise.


Yeah, great points. I thought the same thing soon after clicking "post." I stand corrected on that point. Maybe what I’m really going for here is that “gut” feeling you get when considering a program. For whatever reason--and I’m being dead serious when I say this--I never really felt good about several of the programs I applied to, even before I heard back from them.

I guess this is proof of why you shouldn't begin your research in August:(


In Reply To
gcsumfa, FSU is a school that doesn't even require a scholarly writing sample. I think it's entirely focused on creative writing, and they have wonderful faculty - please don't let poor stationary deter you from applying. For what it's worth, the acceptance letter was also in multiple fonts, folded into three sections plus an extra sliver at the top, without a signature and on very thin paper. With tape across the back, and a stamp on the return address corner. Blame the administrators, not the creative process that goes on there.


Well, that’s good to hear. Honestly, I don’t have a problem with them at all, but I don’t think I’m a good fit for that program for one major reason--I simply can’t afford to live off their stipend, which is smaller than most, if not all, of the programs I’ve researched.


(This post was edited by gcsumfa on Apr 6, 2007, 7:38 PM)


hamlet3145


Apr 6, 2007, 7:45 PM

Post #153 of 2090 (19854 views)
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Quote
But has anyone heard of anyone being accepted by NU this year?


Not this year, but three folks from Montana got in last year. One went for fiction. I'll see if I can do a little digging.

And, yes, my participation in this thread means I'm looking into Ph.d's too. =)





fuzen


Apr 6, 2007, 8:44 PM

Post #154 of 2090 (19844 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

More about the GRE Lit:

When I started my research, I took all the schools and lumped them into two camps: ones that required GRE Lit, and ones that didn't. Then I looked at the ones that required it and I asked myself if the ones that did was worth the trouble. It was - I absolutely had to apply to USC and Houston. So I invested time and energy into the preparation.

But still, I believe that you don't have to have a stellar GRE Lit score for a creative writing PhD, or even that you should have one. A lot of places just want to know that you've taken it, that you've put yourself through a rite of passage. In the end, if you don't have a good enough GRE Lit score and a program didn't admit you because of that, then it's a good thing you didn't go there anyway because they would've had you spend more time than you would've liked on your literature classes.

I made exceptions for USC and Houston, but I didn't apply to anywhere else (including Missouri and Tennessee, both of which I'd considered) that required the GRE Lit because I thought that meant they cared too much about that sort of thing. FSU was the only PhD program I applied to that didn't even ask for a scholarly sample. I could've waited to see if I'd get into Houston off the waitlist, but the idea of going somewhere where creative writing - not literature - is key appealed to me and I made up my mind soon after they called. They are expensive, though. After adjusting for fees and cost of living differences, I'll be well short of what I had here at USM.


LesK
Les
e-mail user

Apr 6, 2007, 10:03 PM

Post #155 of 2090 (19834 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks for the tips....

For the record, my list, at the moment, is:

University of Cincinnati
University of Utah
University of Western Michigan
Florida State University
University of Denver


If I can afford it, I'll likely apply to more (poetry)....and next week, the GRE Lit!!


gcsumfa


Apr 6, 2007, 11:11 PM

Post #156 of 2090 (19823 views)
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Re: [LesK] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Texas Tech is another school that doesn’t require the GRE Lit. Also, for anyone interested, they ask you to email your application materials, which is convenient. Good funding, too: 14,600 stipend plus health insurance. The only catch here is that they do charge a “reduced” tuition rate of 1,100 per semester. Still, when you subtract 2,200 from 14,600 you’re still left with a stipend larger or comparable to many other programs. They have a nice website, too:

http://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/english/

Fuzen,

I definitely don’t think you have to have a stellar GRE Lit score; in fact there is a post earlier on this thread from a Houston student who scored a 480, or something like that. In another post he mentioned that his friend was Western’s top choice one year, and she had something like a 450.

Myself, I bombed it…scored a 440. Didn’t really study though..until, literally, the night before in my hotel room.

I did get 610 on the regular GRE verbal, and I know most places ask for 550 or above, so I felt good in that area.

Anyway, I just looked at Utah’s website and they only require the regular GRE. I really like Utah's set-up; very flexible program, it appears. If anyone knows more about Utah’s program and is willing to alleviate any concerns I might have of stereotypical Mormons, do let me know;)

Finally--and sorry for the rambling post--Denver only provides three years of full funding, according to their website. Just thought I'd mention that to folks looking to apply there; they also seem to favor "experimental" writing, from what folks have told me.


(This post was edited by gcsumfa on Apr 6, 2007, 11:12 PM)


LesK
Les
e-mail user

Apr 7, 2007, 8:21 AM

Post #157 of 2090 (19799 views)
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In Reply To

I definitely don’t think you have to have a stellar GRE Lit score; in fact there is a post earlier on this thread from a Houston student who scored a 480, or something like that. In another post he mentioned that his friend was Western’s top choice one year, and she had something like a 450.

I have heard, however, that a good GRE Lit score is a) a good way to distinguish yourself from other candidates [one way or the other] b) that it comes up in funding discussions..... Of course, the writing sample is still paramount. I'm sure if any school really wants you, they'll figure out a way to make it happen.


mingram
Mike Ingram

Apr 7, 2007, 9:15 AM

Post #158 of 2090 (19793 views)
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Re: [LesK] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm wondering if people here might share what it is they hope to get out of a PhD program in creative writing. Just more time to write? Or is there a sense it might help you get a job?

I'm a little tempted by PhD programs in as much as I really enjoyed the time I was afforded to write as an MFA student. But I worry that my time would be more stretched, since I'd have to take various critical courses and research methods and all manner of other "real" academic stuff that, frankly, I don't have much interest in.

Also, my boss (I work as an adjunct) said getting a creative PhD, in his view, would be redundant, since I already have the terminal degree for my field (he did say that getting a PhD in something else -- rhetoric or lit or whatever -- would help me land a full-time job, but that's not a route I'm interested in). He said I should just finish my book, which of course is my priority anyway -- though it's a priority not so much because I want a full-time job, but because I'm a writer and I want to finish my book.

So, yeah, I guess I'm just wondering what the end-game is. More time to be a student, and to write? A particular kind of instruction that's different than what's available in an MFA program?


gcsumfa


Apr 7, 2007, 9:57 AM

Post #159 of 2090 (19787 views)
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Re: [mingram] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I'm wondering if people here might share what it is they hope to get out of a PhD program in creative writing. Just more time to write? Or is there a sense it might help you get a job?

I'm a little tempted by PhD programs in as much as I really enjoyed the time I was afforded to write as an MFA student. But I worry that my time would be more stretched, since I'd have to take various critical courses and research methods and all manner of other "real" academic stuff that, frankly, I don't have much interest in.

Also, my boss (I work as an adjunct) said getting a creative PhD, in his view, would be redundant, since I already have the terminal degree for my field (he did say that getting a PhD in something else -- rhetoric or lit or whatever -- would help me land a full-time job, but that's not a route I'm interested in). He said I should just finish my book, which of course is my priority anyway -- though it's a priority not so much because I want a full-time job, but because I'm a writer and I want to finish my book.

So, yeah, I guess I'm just wondering what the end-game is. More time to be a student, and to write? A particular kind of instruction that's different than what's available in an MFA program?


Like you I struggle with this issue: to get a PhD or not to get a PhD, though I know that I’ll most likely apply for next year. I do feel like the actual “writing” aspect gets lost sometimes in this mad shuffle to qualify oneself for a “job” that won’t really ever become a reality unless one publishes (though there are a few PhD’s who have managed to land creative writing jobs without a book).

I’d have to disagree with your boss in terms of chances of landing a full-time academic (tenured) job though. A lot of colleges and universities can’t afford to hire someone with an MFA just to teach creative writing and comp, so they like to hire people with PhD’s to teach comp, creative writing, and lit. So unless you’re first book is a huge hit and you land a job in a big time MFA program teaching just creative writing grad students, your first job will most likely be at a small college or university teaching something like a 3/3 or 4/4, with the load being a mixture of comp, creative writing, and lit. So basically, the PhD allows you teach lit in addition to creative writing and comp. Also, you still have to take exams for a PhD in CW and the same number of lit course hours,, so the degree isn’t as “creative” as your boss may think.

Still, there are many ways to skin a cat, and I don’t buy this hype that someone HAS to have a PhD. I know of a few recent hires at CW programs who only have MFA’s. None of them are big names, either.

For myself, I’m 28, and it’s going to take me 4-6 to write my first book anyway, so I figured I might as well buy more time with the PhD while also covering all of my basses.

Finally, a lot of these PhD programs allow you to teach lit and creative writing, classes that can be hard to come by as an adjunct or lecturer, so that’s another consideration as well.


(This post was edited by gcsumfa on Apr 7, 2007, 10:02 AM)


libbyagain


Apr 7, 2007, 12:42 PM

Post #160 of 2090 (19762 views)
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Not that anyone here is interested in this particular route, but a Ph.D. can certainly be handy for having a good shot at a community college position, when it doesn't do much to distinguish one from 300+ other similarly-degree'ed candidates applying to university positions.

The up-side of the cc route: jobs are generally more plentiful that are (relatively) easier to get than at four-years; the transition to a four-year, after one has a strong publishing record in creative writing, is still quite possible to do from a cc (when, for lit. types, the type-casting of the cc experience f-t is not conducive); summers free and the strong possibility of a three-day teaching week, leaving two days available for writing (this is what I do).

The down-side of the cc route: the teaching load is tough (usually 5-5, when 4-years opt more for much less, sometimes even 2-2--though of course "research" is expected at 4-years, but that's what creative writers DO, with their writing, anyway. . .); an atmosphere that's definitely not as stimulating as at 4-years (though the down-and-dirty side of a cc can inspire good creative writing, for sure); the students are. .. needy.

These days, facts are in higher education that "even" cc's can, and usually do, opt to hire Ph.D.'ed candidates. The way things work is, histories of hiring at the M.A. level mean that this is the minimal degree for application (plus, usually, some kind of teaching experience). However, job notices will mention "preferences" of Ph.D.s, and the points system for ranking candidates for interviewing often award 3-5 extra ones for the Ph.D., a difference that has meant, in my experience of 5 hiring committees, that we've interviewed ONLY Ph.D.s. Thus, the difference the degree makes is huge. That said, any single job search has garnered at most 50 or so applicants. Numbers vary for jobs posted in high-density areas, where the pool is larger.

Overall, though: the doctorate is, still, a very large advantage in the cc context, when it isn't in the 4-year context. Degree inflation is sort of like global warming: overall, a very unfortunate thing, but it has its quirky advantages for some "climates," . .. such as the cc climate.

I hope the above isn't too confusing.

Elizabeth


fuzen


Apr 8, 2007, 2:02 AM

Post #161 of 2090 (19713 views)
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I see it as five more years of trying to get published while working closely with other writers and getting paid (even if nominally). The degree is important, obviously, but I appreciate what happens during these five years just as much, if not more, than the privileges that come with those three letters.

It's like, I can write and write and try to get published and work with other writers and also do some work to get paid and get by, and after a while I'll have a doctorate to show for it, or I can write and write and try to get published and take on a day job to get by - but I wouldn't have a community of serious writers around me or the degree to show for my efforts.

I can also see how some people just don't want to do the school thing anymore. I totally sympathize. It's not for everyone. Maybe you can teach kindergarten and publish a worldwide best-selling book like Zadie Smith. Or you could live off of an inheritance and write about the death of your parents and launch your career with that, like Dave Eggers. Oh, the infinite ways you can take to literary stardom. It's all there for you. Me, I've always taken the hard route. I'll forever take the hard route.


(This post was edited by fuzen on Apr 9, 2007, 11:56 AM)


gcsumfa


Apr 8, 2007, 11:03 AM

Post #162 of 2090 (19692 views)
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Re: [fuzen] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

libby,

Thanks for the info about CC teaching. What about someone with an MA and an MFA? Does that change anything?


In Reply To
Or you could live off of an inheritance and write about the death of your parents and launch you career with that, like Dave Eggers.


HAHA.


libbyagain


Apr 10, 2007, 10:30 AM

Post #163 of 2090 (19598 views)
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Good question. I've not run into any double-m.a.-types in hiring processes, so I can't speak to it well. I think, though, that it wouldn't (unfortunately) make a difference except in the case of the school giving extra weight to candidates filling two roles--in this case, lit./comp and creative writing. Unfortunately, most cc's are not picky about fine-tuning pedigrees of their comp.lit versus creative writing instructors. They SHOULD be, but they're not.

One big caveat to what I've writ, of cc's. Some of them, usually in well-endowed, progressive areas, conduct themselves almost like 4-years: meaning, with a high degree of professionalism and discrimination. In the LA metropolitan region where I used to live, one such was Pasadena City College. Another was (this by reputation, since I had no direct experience with them) Santa Monica College. Several more were in the Bay area and northerly. Were I a newly-degree'ed person in either region, or their analogues nation-wide, I would make an effort to target these types of schools energetically, as they hire often, have all the perks I described above for Ph.D.'s, and are helpfully motivated by their high self-regard to provide well-supported opps for their faculty--including even funded leaves of absence for creative work.

I suspect I sound boring, nickle-and-dimey, hair-splitting, etc. re. this-all. It can be a HUGE "downer" to get nose-to-grindstone about hiring opps, and I think many fabulous creative types understandably don't want to sacrifice creative hopes to pragmatic considerations. I totally support the notion of maintaining one's idealism, not sacrificing it to mundane considerations of food on tables, etc., and personally I'd vote for enormous amounts of public money to be dedicated to the arts and humanities so that the aspirations of creative types could be kept where they should be--which is high-high-high.

But, the facts are still that hiring at many/most 4-years is just deplorable, as they, too, rely upon slave-wage adjuncts and continue to fund god-know-what instead of faculty lines. When I lived in LA, during 7 years not one single 4-year opened a position in my field of American literature. Not one. Needing health insurance, and some stability and security, I finally turned to the two-years. And found that there's an art to positioning for such hiring, to conducting the process well and effectively, and to being happy enough teaching there. It CAN be done! It just takes some smarts. And, a Ph.D., imo.

Over and out.

Elizabeth


libbyagain


Apr 10, 2007, 10:43 AM

Post #164 of 2090 (19592 views)
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Double-posting. Ugh! I promise to shut up after this.

As a hint about locating really good cc's in regions with which one is unfamiliar: look for cc's that house NPR affiliates. KCRW, for instance, is housed at Santa Monica College--a very good station, and a good indicator. Also, high-profile cultural involvement by the school in the community. Good art galleries, etc. In Northern CA, some cc's even house a winery, or at least grow grapes! Pittsfield cc (near Northampton) maintains a strong devotion to the American Romantic movement's writers, including good holdings in their library. ALWAYS check out their libraries!!

TRULY over and out, this time.


stephkarto1
Stephanie Kartalopoulos

Apr 12, 2007, 1:11 PM

Post #165 of 2090 (19499 views)
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Re: [libbyagain] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

It's so nice to see some "life" in this thread again!

I've spent a lot of time over the last month and a half researching programs. FSU was SO great about answering my e-mails, and David Kirby was awesome enough to forward my questions to students who are: 2nd year, 3rd year, and 4th year so that I could get different perspectives. Missouri was a bit weirder with the response. Utah was quick and short but did ask me to e-mail questions again over the summer when there was more time to answer. I've also just been talking to people (former thesis advisor and former professors, alums from BFA, MFA, and PhD programs, professor friends of mine who write poetry, alums from my MFA program, etc.) to get perspectives on programs (and on the degree itself) to really start to think about my applications.

Right now, my application list is:

FSU
Missouri
Utah
Houston
GSU
Nebraska

All of these programs are fairly similar in that, of course, the primary focus is creative writing but students must also have a "minor" focus that is more literature-based (well that proportion is more equal than major/minor at Utah, which is fine with me). There seems to be a pretty standard 2/2 teaching load that has some flexibilityto allow students to maybe have a 1/1 teaching load while working in administrative capacities or in editorial capacities at whatever literary journal is associated with the program.

(I *might* also apply to the PhD program at Goldsmiths College at the University of London--I would very seriously welcome the chance to study with Lavinia Greenlaw, and my Greek citizenship might make it easier for me to find part-time jobs to make living in London a possibility--but right now I am highly unsure)

I felt so clueless a couple of months ago because of how much I didn't know and because of how much I had to muster up the guts to ask other people (not the easiest thing for me to do). But I feel pretty good right now. I've gotten a lot of opinions from people on programs and on what really matters in a program, I've thought a lot on my own about what matters to me and why I am applying to each of these programs, and I have started reading the work of faculty members and searching online and in the library for articles that poetry faculty members may have published on the craft of poetry (which, I think, will do more for me to figure out how I will jive with them as their student than just straight-up reading their poetry will). I've started looking at the cost of life in each of the towns that programs are situated so that I can make sure I can afford to be a graduate student in each of these towns should I wind up there, and I have altered my budget to really amp up my savings--applications themselves are expensive, and I think it would be a wise thing to have some financial cushion if I find myself in the "poor grad student" situation.

And this: as silly as it may sound, I've sort of created "Team Stephanie." Getting a PhD and taking that time to consider my work seriously as something publishable AND dcontinuing to develop as a teaching professional really, really matters to me. I have a small network of people who I trust quite significantly with my writing and teaching career who want to help me out in any way possible and who have committed to help me with arranging my poetry manuscript, giving me feedback on my statement of purpose, and helping me make sure, as I am getting applications out the door, that all of my t's are crossed and my i's are dotted. If I am REALLY lucky I will get into one of my top 2 choice programs when I send my applications next year. If I am lucky I will get into a program next year. If not, then I can only keep on applying (watch--in about 10 months I will be a nervous wreck and this shot of perspective will be thrown out the window). Nonetheless--acceptances in hand a year from now or no--I really want to feel confident that I put forth the BEST applications that I could and that I let the people who want to be there for me--and who have enough understanding of these programs--help me. Because I know that as much as I have researched and will continue to research, I don't know everything, I don't have every great idea, and I could definitely use all the help that comes my way.

I'm sort of psyched. Nervous as hell, but psyched as hell. And I am REALLY happy that all of you are coming out of the woodworks to talk about your applications for next year. When I applied for my MFA (gosh, that was 6 1/2 years ago now...), I had the other threads on this board to turn to and to get advice from and to support and be supported by. With the PhD applications, it's sort of different. There aren't as many programs, aren't as many applicants (collectively...), isn't as much of a presence on these boards. But y'all are a great presence! I hope that we can all just really support each other in this kickass sort of way next year. :)


jacarty
Jessie Carty
e-mail user

Apr 12, 2007, 1:29 PM

Post #166 of 2090 (19493 views)
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Re: [stephkarto1] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Stephanie, I enjoyed reading your post. Everything you said is the kind of thoughts I had when I went through finally deciding to apply to an MFA program.

SO best of luck to you. I think that is really exciting. I am early in my career of writing and teaching (hope to teach!) but I'd love to see where you end up because I have a feeling a PHD might be in my future some day too.

**best wishes**
Jessie


http://jessiecarty.com


gcsumfa


Apr 14, 2007, 11:31 PM

Post #167 of 2090 (19426 views)
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Re: [jacarty] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Is anyone familiar with Salt Lake City? I am interested in applying to Utah, but would like to know more about the city...the straight dope.


stephkarto1
Stephanie Kartalopoulos

Apr 16, 2007, 10:04 AM

Post #168 of 2090 (19385 views)
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All I know about SLC is that there are weird things about drinking--you can freely get alcohol at sit-down restaurants. There are no regular old bars or pubs like there are in other cities--there are, instead, 'private clubs' if you will to which you must obtain a membership where you can go and drink as if you were in a bar in Anyothertown, USA. And some searching on Craig's List tells me that there are some pretty affordable apartments around the city. Friends have told me that it's beautiful, a great place if you're into outdoors stuff, and I know (just because it is of interest to me...) that Utah has a bicycla coalition and has some maps and roadways that seem to be (at least somewhat, as I have no experience...) bicycle-friendly...


libbyagain


Apr 16, 2007, 11:42 AM

Post #169 of 2090 (19366 views)
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The university is fabulous. The library's first-rate. The u. community is a bastion of progressivism in Utah, since everyone in the region hard-core Mormon would prefer Brigham Young down the road in Provo, instead. If you live in the East Bench area, you will be surrounded by many u. types. For myself, there is absolutely no way on god's green earth I'd have lived ANYWHERE else than the East Bench.

Imo, SLC is a VERY creepy town. The sense of repression is, again imo, pervasive. The tabernacle compound is visible everywhere, and, for me, was a good symbol of the quality of life in SLC: beautiful in a way, and inescapably creepy.

Skiing is amazing, close by. Cottonwood Canyon is a truly gorgeous area, easy to access from the East Bench too, where you can take great walks etc. Microbreweries are everywhere, and their brew is great. The (Something) Owl bookstore in the University area, was wonderful--a great contact point for the many others like yourself trying to remain sane in Utah.


gcsumfa


Apr 29, 2007, 1:59 AM

Post #170 of 2090 (19269 views)
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Re: [libbyagain] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Ahhhhhhhh. part of me really wants to apply to Utah, but I can't get the whole "creepy Utah" thing out of my head.

Anyway, thanks for the posts on SLC.


hapworth


May 14, 2007, 1:28 AM

Post #171 of 2090 (19180 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Just thought I'd post and say that I finished my first year in the University of Missouri-Columbia's PhD program (fiction emphasis). Great place. Good funding (for me, $14,000 plus the $3500 I'll earn teaching a summer class). Great cost of living. Great college football. Great teaching opps: I taught comp my first semester, but then I taught creative writing in the spring, I'll teach creative writing again this summer, and I'll be teaching Intro to American Lit this fall.


gcsumfa


May 14, 2007, 11:49 AM

Post #172 of 2090 (19150 views)
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Re: [hapworth] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Just thought I'd post and say that I finished my first year in the University of Missouri-Columbia's PhD program (fiction emphasis). Great place. Good funding (for me, $14,000 plus the $3500 I'll earn teaching a summer class). Great cost of living. Great college football. Great teaching opps: I taught comp my first semester, but then I taught creative writing in the spring, I'll teach creative writing again this summer, and I'll be teaching Intro to American Lit this fall.


Thanks for the post, Hapworth!

How important is the GRE Lit for admission at Mizzou?


hapworth


May 19, 2007, 12:06 AM

Post #173 of 2090 (19077 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

It's difficult to say. I've never really asked anyone with admissions inside info about the importance of the GRE Subject Test in Lit. My guess is that the lit exam is semi-important, but not ultra-important. It wouldn't do well to bomb the exam (but if your writing is outstanding, even then the exam might not matter), so I'm guessing that the admissions committee just wants to see a score of 500+ to make sure that you can handle doctoral work. I think that the subject test can be a factor when it comes time for weeding out or deciding who receives a fellowship. For instance, I'm on fellowship, which means I teach one class per semester for the four years that I'll be here. My GRE Subject Test score was far from outstanding (610), but it probably fit certain criteria so that I was awarded the fellowship. I hope this feedback helps somehow.

In Reply To

In Reply To
Just thought I'd post and say that I finished my first year in the University of Missouri-Columbia's PhD program (fiction emphasis). Great place. Good funding (for me, $14,000 plus the $3500 I'll earn teaching a summer class). Great cost of living. Great college football. Great teaching opps: I taught comp my first semester, but then I taught creative writing in the spring, I'll teach creative writing again this summer, and I'll be teaching Intro to American Lit this fall.


Thanks for the post, Hapworth!

How important is the GRE Lit for admission at Mizzou?



gcsumfa


May 22, 2007, 1:46 AM

Post #174 of 2090 (19001 views)
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Re: [hapworth] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks for the info, Hapworth. So Mizzou's program can be completed in 4 years, I take it?






In Reply To
It's difficult to say. I've never really asked anyone with admissions inside info about the importance of the GRE Subject Test in Lit. My guess is that the lit exam is semi-important, but not ultra-important. It wouldn't do well to bomb the exam (but if your writing is outstanding, even then the exam might not matter), so I'm guessing that the admissions committee just wants to see a score of 500+ to make sure that you can handle doctoral work. I think that the subject test can be a factor when it comes time for weeding out or deciding who receives a fellowship. For instance, I'm on fellowship, which means I teach one class per semester for the four years that I'll be here. My GRE Subject Test score was far from outstanding (610), but it probably fit certain criteria so that I was awarded the fellowship. I hope this feedback helps somehow.

In Reply To

In Reply To
Just thought I'd post and say that I finished my first year in the University of Missouri-Columbia's PhD program (fiction emphasis). Great place. Good funding (for me, $14,000 plus the $3500 I'll earn teaching a summer class). Great cost of living. Great college football. Great teaching opps: I taught comp my first semester, but then I taught creative writing in the spring, I'll teach creative writing again this summer, and I'll be teaching Intro to American Lit this fall.


Thanks for the post, Hapworth!

How important is the GRE Lit for admission at Mizzou?




(This post was edited by gcsumfa on May 22, 2007, 1:48 AM)


__________



May 22, 2007, 10:22 AM

Post #175 of 2090 (18974 views)
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Re: [gcsumfa] 2008? [In reply to] Can't Post

Wait--how does the four year thing shake out when you're entering with a two or three year MFA?

How much time off for good behavior?


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