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the wind



Apr 27, 2005, 2:32 AM

Post #1 of 74 (4281 views)
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Straight to grad school or take some time off? Can't Post

Pongo thought it would be good to ask something interersting, so here it is:

Do you wish you went straignt to the MFA or are you glad you took some time off?

Sometimes I romanticize that i just went straight to school and that i already had my degree and book and career and tour etc. i see my friend who is only 27 and that is her life. she is already a tenure track prof with a book out.

however, realistically, it was impossible. i knew i wanted to write, but had knew clue how or what or when or why. it took two career paths, teaching and politics, to see that writing was my calling. for me, i think i've paid my dues: quitting a full income, taking workshops, reading reading reading, and writing writing. i also surrounded myself with artists and writers and those in the know.

i do get antsy at times cause this path is so hard and long and i'd like to get to what i consider the first big step which is having a book out. to me, that is the big goal. from observation, that's when the career gets real and you things happen, doors open.

but i'm glad i'm taking a longer route (i'm almost 30) and also think that in the long run my writing will be stronger and fuller cause i've lived life outside of school and will have that to draw on. i can delve into political life and scandal and my travels in asia and europe, and all the random adventures i seem to get into. like kaytie wrote in the mfa like/dislike thread, we need writers who've lived not ivory tower, homogenized milk ones.

so for me, i'm glad i'm going now when my writing is ready for the mfa program. though i do get impatient at times. talked to a prof at riverside today and hearing his enthusiasm for me and my classmates is getting me so excited i could scream. i can't wait to start this next part of my writing life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


(This post was edited by motet on Mar 26, 2006, 11:37 AM)


pongo
Buy this book!

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Apr 27, 2005, 10:58 AM

Post #2 of 74 (4254 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I took a short break between my BA and graduate school -- 26 years -- and I think it was the best idea for me. It gave me a chance to see what I really wanted to do with my life (had I gone straight into grad school I would have gone the traditional MA PhD route, instead of the MFA, and possibly have wound up in classics altogether).

dmh


The Review Mirror, available at www.unsolicitedpress.com

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darredet
Darren A. Deth


Apr 27, 2005, 11:18 AM

Post #3 of 74 (4251 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I remember classmates of mine applying to graduate programs during their Senior year. I thought they were crazy. For me, it's fourteen years between the BA and the MFA, which I start in June.

Darren


Amethyst


Apr 27, 2005, 12:07 PM

Post #4 of 74 (4243 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

Arrgh. I wrote out a whole long answer to this question, and then it got lost in cyberspace. Well, here's another shot.

In a way, I've tried both routes--gone to grad school right away, and then waited. I know that sounds contradictory, but let me explain. I graduated from college in 1983. I was a very good student, English major, top of the class and so one. I went straight on to an M.A. program in English at a 'name' school, intending ultimately to get my Ph.D. I ended up having one of the worst years of my life. The atmosphere at the program I attended was not at all supportive. I ended up leaving after finishing the M.A. which took--thankfully--only one year. I worked for the next fives years, during which I also moved to another city. I decided to give a grad school another try, and applied to a program at a university near where I lived. Although not a 'name' program, it was very strong in the area I intended to study at the time, modernism. I was much happier at this school--the professors were engaged with the students, and the students were supportive of one another. However, as I got closer to writing my dissertation, I came to realize that I didn't want to be a critic/scholar. I loved literature, but spending life as a theory geek was not my path. So, I left the program. That was one of the hardest decisions I ever made. I spent the next several years working at a series of crappy jobs, and trying my hand at various creative outlets, which led me, in a very roundabout way, to writing poetry. I took some workshops here and there, and finally decided to take the plunge and apply to MFA programs. I am very fortunate to have been admitted to Warren Wilson.

I have not started the program yet, so I cannot comment on how that experience will be after years away from school. I can say, though, that my writing has benefitted enormously from having lived through all the stuff I've lived through. I have written some very strong pieces that I could not have written 20 years ago. In fact, 20 years ago, I didn't even believe that I could be a poet. I didn't have the confidence.

Sometimes I do feel some pangs of regret over not yet having achieved certain milestones--I mean, some of the people I who were in my M.A. program have published books and are now tenured et cetera et cetera. But we all develop at our own rates. There are certainly many many people today publishing their first books in their forties and fifties. I believe we all take the path we were meant to take, the one that will benefit us the most creatively.


rutha


Apr 27, 2005, 12:16 PM

Post #5 of 74 (4239 views)
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Re: [darredet] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

For me it was 15 years from BA to MFA, with a law degree in between. I can't stress enough how much that changed my MFA experience compared to the majority of my classmates who came right from undergraduate school. So many were dealing with life/growing up issues that were a big part of their work (not that uncommon, of course) -- but it's all about perspective, which was sometimes lacking, and made some students defensive and unwilling to be open to suggestions because they acted as if we were commenting on their life and their decisions rather than their work. That can happen in any workshop, of course, but it just seemed to me that it was more acute the younger the group was. While I had an overall good "residential" MFA experience, I guess I'd really suggest to "older" writers thinking about it to seriously consider a low res program -- you're likely to find more "life experienced" people, if that's important to you. Again, this is just my experience...And you're not going to know until you get there.


catenz
CATenz

Apr 27, 2005, 2:35 PM

Post #6 of 74 (4224 views)
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Re: [rutha] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

Wait. Even just a year. Wait.


thebeatbaby


Apr 27, 2005, 3:04 PM

Post #7 of 74 (4220 views)
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Re: [catenz] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I only took two years off between ba and ma and really I only wanted to take one, but I didn't get in anywhere my first time applying and had to spend another year, doing nothing but getting ready, which was probably incredibly important. I don't know about whether or not it's important to live & what not before going to school, but I think it's really important to take a long look at your work ahead of time & figure out what the hell you're going to do.


lillyl


Apr 27, 2005, 3:16 PM

Post #8 of 74 (4217 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I didn't wait between BA and MFA, and I don't regret it, though I do see some ways that it has made grad school a little bit harder.

The reason why I didn't wait was financial-- if I did an MFA with a teaching fellowship then I'd basically be getting paid to go to school and write. I didn't want to get a "real job" yet (as if teaching freshman english isn't a real job!), so I decided to do the MfA.

The downside is that I feel less prepared than other MFAers who took time off to write & study. I feel far less familiar with contemporary writers & have less of a grasp on different "schools" of poetry. I also feel my workshop vocabulary is little rusty. Despite all that, anything is better than working full time at some crummy job & having no time to write.


edwriter



Apr 27, 2005, 3:22 PM

Post #9 of 74 (4215 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Pongo thought it would be good to ask something interersting, so here it is:

Do you wish you went straignt to the MFA or are you glad you took some time off?


Well, it's a difficult question because when I was a college senior I hadn't yet taken any fiction workshops, and would not have had any adequate writing samples to submit (I ultimately matriculated in an MFA program as a fiction candidate, although I was admitted a year out of college [to a different program] in nonfiction. I declined that offer and went back to school in another field altogether). I wanted to write, but I envisioned my writing going in a different direction, and my life went in a different direction, too.

I'm glad I had the break. The intervening years brought experiences, perspectives, etc.--lots of things other people have mentioned. Ten years elapsed between my college graduation and my first MFA residency. I definitely didn't know enough about fiction writing when I finished college to have accomplished very much in an MFA program, although I'd say I had a pretty decent background as a reader. The extra time of course allowed me to read more, and more widely. And that was very helpful.


Quiet Americans: Stories
http://www.erikadreifus.com



elli
Ellen Meeropol

e-mail user

Apr 27, 2005, 3:50 PM

Post #10 of 74 (4210 views)
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Re: [edwriter] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, I took 35 years "off" between my BA and entering a low-res program in fiction. In that interval I had a career in healthcare and read voraciously. When I decided to write fiction, I did workshops and conferences until I felt ready/needing a more rigourous and organized manner of study.

Certainly I'm not suggesting this as an optimal career path!

I don't know about the regular "residency" MFAs, but in low-res programs there is usually a wide range of student ages. And wide acceptance for the different choices writers make and the various pathways to learning our craft.


Ellen

www.ellenmeeropol.com


Kaytie
Kaytie M. Lee

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Apr 27, 2005, 6:32 PM

Post #11 of 74 (4185 views)
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Re: [elli] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I took my time getting my BA degree, so that I was already a few years older than most of the students in my class when I graduated. Then I worked for a year in product marketing, long enough to realize that business was not for me. That's when I started applying for graduate programs in creative writing. I was lucky--I hadn't done much writing before but I was reading about two novels a week. By the end of the second year I had three schools to pick from. I was in my late 20s. I choose sooner rather than later because I had just gotten divorced and was free to go anywhere. I wanted to go to school for myself for once.

Okay, I've just deleted about four different paragraphs after the last one, trying to say that there is life outside of universities, and writers better experience it lest we fall into that cliche of writing about writers because that's all we know. The only book I've read that has been successful at that was Carol Shields' Unless. But then I sounded all soapboxy and didactic, so I deleted it all.

Living outside of universities is a good thing...at least, for a while. Yesterday I was actually browsing around for graduate programs in history. :)


Kaytie M. Lee Last Updated November 2008

(This post was edited by Kaytie on Apr 27, 2005, 6:34 PM)


silkfx2004


Apr 27, 2005, 9:47 PM

Post #12 of 74 (4168 views)
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Re: [Kaytie] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I got my BA in English in 1987, and I'll be starting at Iowa this fall, so when I get out it'll be 20 years on the nose between the receipt of one degree and the receipt of the other.

I've largely gotten out of the habit of thinking "what if?" because I believe that everything happens in its own good time. Still, I'm sorry that it took me this long to finally make the move, because if I'd done this sooner, maybe I'd have had a better time adjusting to the notion of grad student life on a campus full of teens and 20-somethings.

I don't remember my undergraduate faculty advisor ever mentioning or suggesting the MFA to me and I used to wonder why. Maybe he believed, as I now do, that it's a good idea to live a little life before going to grad school. But there's a difference between "a little life" and 18 years of life. I am watching everything I've known slowly fade away and in front of me lies a new and, frankly, terrifying path. Ironically, it's not the program itself that scares me (though it probably should!)...it's all the other things that are associated with leaving a big city for a small college town, leaving a freelance career for a teaching assistantship, etc.

Again, I do believe that if it's not time for you to go, it's not time, and that's okay. But if you pin me down, I guess my advice would be to take some time off, but don't take TOO much time off.


--------
Nobody but God gets it right the first time. Everybody else has to rewrite. --attributed to Stephen King


Wilding


Apr 28, 2005, 1:13 PM

Post #13 of 74 (4133 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

Taking time off is absolutely the best. A writer needs life experience to add depth to their writing. Being stuck in a workshop with a young (and often overly confident) writer who has AP written all over everything they produce is dreadful. Also, they are less likely to take critique well because they lack maturity (What, you don't all like me?) Unless someone is gung-ho on the teaching track I'd advise against cramming all your school years into one ulcer producing blur.


(This post was edited by Wilding on Apr 28, 2005, 1:16 PM)


the wind



Apr 28, 2005, 1:43 PM

Post #14 of 74 (4126 views)
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Re: [Wilding] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

What is AP?


Wilding


Apr 28, 2005, 3:30 PM

Post #15 of 74 (4114 views)
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Re: [the wind] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
What is AP?



AP stands for "Advanced Placement" classes that are offered in high schools so kids can rush through college quickly. I think offering advanced courses is wonderful but not when students are using it as another opportunity to check an achievement off their list. Good writing is only enhanced by lingering, enjoyment, and the rich disappointments of an interesting life not hastily chewed and spat back out onto a resume.


edwriter



Apr 28, 2005, 5:53 PM

Post #16 of 74 (4094 views)
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Re: [Wilding] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

In Reply To
What is AP?



AP stands for "Advanced Placement" classes that are offered in high schools so kids can rush through college quickly. I think offering advanced courses is wonderful but not when students are using it as another opportunity to check an achievement off their list. Good writing is only enhanced by lingering, enjoyment, and the rich disappointments of an interesting life not hastily chewed and spat back out onto a resume.


Well, that's one way to look at it. And in my high school there was certainly the sense that AP credits were something colleges were looking for, too. At the same time, I was pretty sure then and even more certain now that all the intense and intensive reading (not to mention writing) that my AP English and French Literature classes (among others) required also enhanced my writing. It's true that they allowed me to start advanced work my freshman year in college, but that in turn provided some other options during my four undergraduate years (such as spending a semester abroad without worrying about how credits would transfer). As you say, advanced courses can be really wonderful.

Not to take this thread off on a tangent....


Quiet Americans: Stories
http://www.erikadreifus.com



the wind



Apr 29, 2005, 12:53 AM

Post #17 of 74 (4073 views)
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Re: [Wilding] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

upon further thought, man what was i thinking? there is no way, NO WAY, i could have gone from undergrad to an MFA program. for me, i am a first generation college student and all through school my priority was just paying for it. After that, i worried about grades, then having fun. i learned stuff, but it was AFTER school that i learned so much. where i learned what i wanted to learn, read what i wanted to read, and could really control who i became as a person. add all that up, and who i became as a person is related to who i became as writer.

yeah, no way, take some time off. travel, read, meet people of all ages, party, live.

LIVE!!!!

then write


shadowboxer


May 1, 2005, 3:06 AM

Post #18 of 74 (4024 views)
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Re: [Wilding] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

This is a bit extreme. I've never heard the term "AP" used to describe a writer's work. Is this common on the graduate level? I am guessing that a large volume of "AP" quality work in workshops is probably a reflection of the quality of the program. Did your program screen students with a manuscript req? I am just curious...


In any case, I agree that life experience can add depth to writing. While it's generally true that older people have more experience, I think it's a mistake to assume that this is the rule in all cases. Some people have unconventional experiences or suffer hardships growing up that broaden their perspectives. Not everyone goes the high school to undergrad route.

I think someone earlier on this thread mentioned the adjustment to unfamiliar terms etc. in their genre. Much emphasis (rightfully so) is placed on the writing sample, but I believe that people are underestimating the importance of being well read in your genre. This is just something I have observed on a personal level. I think people who rush into an MFA without a solid understanding of the genre they are studying and its evolution over the years etc. do themselves a disservice.

Finally, I think whether you jump directly from undergrad to the MFA depends on who you studied with and the quality of the writing program at your school. The thesis requirements for my school are very similar to those of many MFA schools, and there have been some students that have their theses accepted by major publishers and sign multibook contracts- all at the undergrad level.


rapunzel1983
Marisa Lee

Mar 25, 2006, 4:14 AM

Post #19 of 74 (3913 views)
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Re: [shadowboxer] On Pongo's Advice: Straight to grad school or take some time off? [In reply to] Can't Post

I think shadowboxer makes an excellent point about reading.

Reading widely in your genre is about as important as life experience. Actually, absorbing as much as possible, reading everything you can get your hands will make you grow exponentially faster. I've tried to accelerate myself by taking up a zillion hobbies and keeping a fresh influx of reading material and subscribing to many magazines. For me, knowledge is everything because it shapes your perspective. Because I know I'm young and lack that experience, I talk to old people a lot. I ask them hundreds of questions. I also take interest (or force myself to take interest) in "old" people's problems. Taxes, divorce, childbirth--I read books on parenting and stuff. I attend as many religious services as possible and take detailed notes on visceral experiences, so I can reuse them later.

That said, other people have made great points about young people and their issues. They're right. It's very tough. I have to constantly work against the grain of my immaturity. Honestly, I do feel it popping up here and there, like loose springs in a sofa.

At the same time, one thing I love about being young is the complete ABANDON with which I am able to throw myself into writing. it's great to just recklessly, hopelessly love something. so that you'd be able to endure anything for it, even the loss of friends and lovers and sanity. Because I'm not burdened by a spouse or children or real world responsibilities or anything pretty much, I can give 150% to writing. I can still pull all-nighters like a college student with too much energy to waste. And I do not need to fear failure because I have the excuse of age.

That said, there's a terrible emptiness that creeps up in me sometimes, and I think it's due to the fact that I'm pursuing this art so intensely. It's like a death drive. Because writing is so bound up with everything I am, I feel sick when I have a failure. It punches my heart out. Like one of those arts-and-crafts-hole-punchers that you slide on to a sheet of construction paper. It just goes right through me, and I feel just dead, punched out. And I look at my friends around me, and I think, "They are so lucky. They work for corporations. When they get home from work, they can relax. Why can't I relax? Cause I'm the sole person responsible for this. If this doesn't work out, it's my fault."

Also, because I come from an immigrant family, I'm going against all the survival mechanisms that are built into me. This, too, is why I'm so crazy about writing. I MUST make this work. I went against my parents for this.

But this how I think of it--I'm going to be a writer for life. Therefore, even if I am not fully matured during my MFA, I will think of it as a toolkit, something to take with me forever. Not necessarily a finished product.

And I love school. To me it is literally paradise on earth. literally. During my undergrad career, I went to bed everynight thinking, "How is it possible to be so happy?" It was a happiness so intense it had a tinge of sadness. I hope MFA is the same way.


augustmaria


Mar 25, 2006, 9:29 AM

Post #20 of 74 (3905 views)
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No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post

This issue really gets to me. When I was in the act of applying, around October, I posted my SOP for critique in one of the livejournal grad communities. Granted, it was an awful draft of an awful version of the SOP, but that wasn't what people focused on. I received a resounding, "You are too young to get into an MFA program!" I was called naive, too young, etc.

"MFA programs accept one, maybe two, applicants who are coming straight out of undergrad. Do you really think that you can make it in?"

Yes, actually, I can. F&*# you. I was accepted at Montana and waitlisted at three other great schools. I'm a good writer and I'm twenty-one years old. I'm sorry that you weren't at this position when you were my age, but that doesn't mean that I need to take the same route that you did.

I've been working at this since I was five years old. I've been writing stories for the majority of my life. I don't do it to be published and I don't do it for any other reason besides it's how I cope and it's how I survive. That has nothing to do with age.

And life experience? Right now, I'm convinced I've had enough life experience. I don't need to take some years off to get any more messed up in order to write well. Just because I've been in school for seventeen years doesn't mean I haven't been through hell and back. I have.

So I'll agree with you in that most[ students straight out of undergrad aren't right for an MFA program, but there are students who are--students who have lived enough to write beautifully, who are self-aware enough to handle critique, and mature enough to value the luxury they are being given in an MFA program. Which is why I'm putt off by the blanket statements of "take time off" and "it's better to do it this way, the way I did it." Because, no, for me it's better to do it this way, the way I'm doing it.


sarandipidy


Mar 25, 2006, 10:21 AM

Post #21 of 74 (3897 views)
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Re: [augustmaria] No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post

I agree with you. Everyone has different life experiences under their belts and different ages. I am 21 years old as well and I remember my professors encouraging time off.

But I think that "time off" is romanticized too much. In order to pay for food, rent, health insurance and undergrad loans (which you start paying once you leave the 'school system'), I would have to work so much that I'd barely have time to write. There is no way I could just pick up and move to, say, Colorado on a whim for 'experience.' My boyfriend would be writing his honors thesis all year and I would be waiting tables for all hours of the day, in Ithaca winter. I can picture myself with intense ennui; I'd probably be jealous of my boyfriend for still being in school. He was the only reason I was thinking about a year off--so that I wouldn't have to be away from him for a year--but we both realized that all the idle time in Ithaca wouldn't be good for me as a writer.

Now I get to live and breathe my work in a completely new city, on an opposite coast: a completely new environment. My mom and I will do the cross country drive out there so that I can have a car, which will allow me to see lots of great Pac NW sites. I have full funding for the first year and should have it for the second year (I will need to pass a comp teaching class first, which I'm confident I can do). This seems like an experience much more conducive to good writing than 1) staying in Ithaca to waitress all winter while my fiance kills himself over his thesis, 2) living with my parents.

I would love to pick up and move somewhere all by myself, with no money or friends, and with only a BA degree to get me a job that is lucrative enough to pay for food/rent/heat/loans/long-distance phone calls home. And don't forget the loneliness. But it's just simply not an option right now.

So I'm going to do my MFA right out of undergrad, and I think I'll be just as 'mature' as the older students. I take criticism very well in workshop. I am a sensitive person but I am not stupid; I know that workshops are meant for critiquing and perfecting poems. And who says that you don't have 'experiences' while in your MFA program? Things happen to you regardless of where you are. These things may not be as earth-shaking as those in the Peace Corps, but it's not like your life just stops, or would be much different for your writing if you were waitressing rather than TAing.

My two cents, anyway.


zyzzyvas1


Mar 25, 2006, 12:04 PM

Post #22 of 74 (3873 views)
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Re: [sarandipidy] No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post

Obviously there are exceptions to everything. It wouldn't be too hard to make a list of brilliant, successful writers who never "took any time off," or who "never did something else for a while." But I think where this idea comes from is that if all you've ever done is gone to school, you don't know what it's like *not* to be in school. Seems obvious, but it's no small thing.

No matter how smart, mature, or worldly you are, you have don't know what it's like to not be surrounded by the insular fantasyland of academia. This being a wonderful place where an incredible value is placed on the esoteric and the arcane, and where you are automatically surrounded by people with like interests and minds (a very, very important reason why I'm going back to get an MFA after 10 years). Sadly, the "real world" just ain't like this.

When people suggest time off, I don't think it should be taken as some kind of personal attack that you're not ready or capable of writing about complex ideas at a very high level. That's not true. But, that said, there is a maturity that comes with living, and seeing a few things, and there is no substitute for that. Be it right or wrong, I made damn sure to ask at every place where I was accepted what the average age of the students is -- because I don't want my peers to be a classful of just-out-of-undergrad writers. A mix is fine, but I'd much rather have my classmates skew about 8-10 years older. That's just me though.


augustmaria


Mar 25, 2006, 1:22 PM

Post #23 of 74 (3844 views)
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Re: [zyzzyvas1] No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post

I guess what irks me the most about how people discuss this is the patronizing tone. I get the vibe from these posts that there's a sense of resentment towards the applicants who are coming right out of undergrad, that we haven't "paid our dues" or something. To me, that just seems silly. I'm talented, driven, and ready. No one has the right to tell me I'm naive or that I haven't seen enough--especially when he/she only has my age to go on. That's like assuming everyone over thirty is an emotionally mature adult. Which, I know first-hand, is not true. Just because you've "seen things" doesn't mean that you're a good writer. And just because you're a sheltered young thing doesn't mean that you're a immature fool. That's an obvious statement, but I felt it needed to be said in this thread, as this side of the issue is under-represented. No disrespect--just sticking up for myself.


viviandarkbloom


Mar 25, 2006, 2:15 PM

Post #24 of 74 (3819 views)
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Re: [augustmaria] No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post

I make no claims at maturity. To be honest, I'm pretty damn immature. I'm not promoting any particular path. We've all had our Orphic trips to hell and back, and as long as all your stories don't take place on a college campus, that's fine. I've been to this mythical "real world" (and I don't mean the TV show), but I can still see how my life experience has limited my writing. As much as I'd like to go to grad school right this second, I know that if I come back to school five or ten years from now my writing will be better for it. This is not to say I will take that time off. I really have no idea.


soft petal


Mar 25, 2006, 2:31 PM

Post #25 of 74 (3810 views)
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Re: [viviandarkbloom] No Time Off [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
As long as all your stories don't take place on a college campus, that's fine.

I'm glad someone cleared that up for me! Especially before I applied. There seems to be a whole cottage industry of literary novels that take place on college campuses, from White Noise to Wonder Boys--I guess this is why I felt it was ok. So can anyone recommend a good place to set a story? Like maybe one of you has worked at a bookstore or for UPS, and has a kickass idea along those lines? That would be sweet.

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