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motet
Dana Davis / Moderator
e-mail user

Jun 13, 2008, 7:36 AM

Post #1 of 1018 (32263 views)
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     Choosing an MFA Program (2009) (2010) (2011)  

The application season for 2011 is approaching and choosing the right MFA program can be a difficult and sometimes agonizing decision. There are so many choices to be made when it comes to the type of program, cost, location, and duration. Which is best, a full-time program or a low residency? Is it affordable? How's the funding? Will you be freezing cold for most of the year or sweltering in the humidity? Can you spend three years or only two?

This topic is a good place to start answering these questions and others.


Click on this link to view the 2008 Choosing an MFA thread

For a complete listing of all the active topics in this forum, see DIRECTORY - Topics in the MFA Forum

Good luck to all 2011 applicants!




(This post was edited by motet on Apr 4, 2010, 3:56 PM)


moomoocow42


Jun 17, 2008, 3:02 AM

Post #2 of 1018 (32112 views)
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     Re: [motet] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

I've done a fair amount of research, thanks in large part to Tom Kealey's wonderful guide, and was wondering if anyone could give any insight or suggestions to my current list. A couple things to know: my first priority is funding. While I plan to have a bit of money saved up from work by the time I go to school, I'd like to obviously spend as little of it as possible, keeping it for emergencies and such. My second priority is location, which ranks pretty close to my first priority. I currently live in Chicago, and would love to not have to move very far. It would have to take either a stellar program or a knockout funding package (or both) to get me to move to either coast. Lastly, and keeping with the location priority, I do somewhat need to stay at programs that are close to mid- or large-sized cities, as I am dragging my girlfriend along with me, and she needs to find gainful employment in her field in wherever we end up. Here is the list so far:

University of Illinois at Chicago
Columbia College (in Chicago)
Roosevelt University
Notre Dame
University of Michigan
Johns Hopkins
Temple University
University of Pittsburgh
George Mason University
Rutgers-Newark
Syracuse

I have what I hope is a wide combination of "safe" schools (safe as defined as schools that I feel I have a better than 1.5% chance of admission), large schools, and selective schools. Thoughts? Suggestions? Criticisms? I'm especially interested to hear if anyone has anything to say about the Rutgers-Newark program, especially as to how their funding is.

Oh, and thanks in advance for reading what is turning out to be a long and rambling email! The thought of applying to Grad school is already stressing me out and it's not even the Fall yet...


My MFA Blog -- Watch me slowly lose my sanity.


HopperFu


Jun 17, 2008, 8:10 AM

Post #3 of 1018 (32098 views)
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     Re: [moomoocow42] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

If you want to stay in the midwest, add Indiana. Bloomington is a reasonably sized city (I think), and they have good funding.


hamlet3145


Jun 17, 2008, 9:37 AM

Post #4 of 1018 (32088 views)
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     Re: [moomoocow42] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

If it were me, I'd throw Iowa into the mix as well. One good night out on the town in Chicago costs more than the app fee.

One completely under the radar midwestern program I'd like to mention is Iowa State's MFA. "What?" the crowd gasps. No, really. Prior to going to Montana I earned an M.A. in English with a concentration in creative writing at Iowa State. (If one were to dig back to the '97 rankings this program was actually 33rd). Since then they have remade the degree into an MFA in "Creative Writing and the Environment." It jumped from a 2 year to a 3 year, 54 credit program. When I was there everyone had a TA and a couple of us had Hogrefe fellowships which paid the same as a TA during the 1st year but you didn't have to teach. Cheryl St. Germain (who is now the director at Chattham) did much of the design work for the program when she was faculty. ISU has a nice campus and Ames was pleasant to live in. Obviously, those not interested in this type of environmental focus would be better off elsewhere.

http://engl.iastate.edu/...reative_writing/mfa/


gcsumfa


Jun 17, 2008, 10:29 AM

Post #5 of 1018 (32076 views)
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     Re: [moomoocow42] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  


In Reply To
I've done a fair amount of research, thanks in large part to Tom Kealey's wonderful guide, and was wondering if anyone could give any insight or suggestions to my current list. A couple things to know: my first priority is funding. While I plan to have a bit of money saved up from work by the time I go to school, I'd like to obviously spend as little of it as possible, keeping it for emergencies and such. My second priority is location, which ranks pretty close to my first priority. I currently live in Chicago, and would love to not have to move very far. It would have to take either a stellar program or a knockout funding package (or both) to get me to move to either coast. Lastly, and keeping with the location priority, I do somewhat need to stay at programs that are close to mid- or large-sized cities, as I am dragging my girlfriend along with me, and she needs to find gainful employment in her field in wherever we end up. Here is the list so far:

University of Illinois at Chicago
Columbia College (in Chicago)
Roosevelt University
Notre Dame
University of Michigan
Johns Hopkins
Temple University
University of Pittsburgh
George Mason University
Rutgers-Newark
Syracuse

I have what I hope is a wide combination of "safe" schools (safe as defined as schools that I feel I have a better than 1.5% chance of admission), large schools, and selective schools. Thoughts? Suggestions? Criticisms? I'm especially interested to hear if anyone has anything to say about the Rutgers-Newark program, especially as to how their funding is.

Oh, and thanks in advance for reading what is turning out to be a long and rambling email! The thought of applying to Grad school is already stressing me out and it's not even the Fall yet...


You might want to add Western Michigan to your list; Kalamazoo isn't that far from Chicago.


RaoulDuke
Cobra Cobachi

Jun 17, 2008, 11:21 AM

Post #6 of 1018 (32065 views)
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     Re: [moomoocow42] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

Hey Moomoo,

If funding is your first priority, then you may want to scratch Columbia College off the list. While the program looks great, the possibility for funding only exists, really, after your first year. They don't offer assistantships until you have been in the program for one year and then decide to go into the teaching aspect of the degree (which is a dual degree).

Roosevelt seems to have fairly poor funding as well, if any, but it's been a few months since I have scoured their website for the little information I recall them providing in the way of funding.

I would add Southern Illinois to the list, although Carbondale isn't much of a big city. The price is right though; most if not all admitted students receive funding.

Other than that I think the list looks good, but like the MFA experts advise: apply to at least 15 places, because there is no such thing as an MFA safety school (especially when funding is involved).

Good luck!

Rick


mchard


Jun 17, 2008, 11:27 AM

Post #7 of 1018 (32063 views)
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     Re: [richardkae] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

Purdue, Indiana, Ohio State and Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) all offer excellent funding. They are also close to Chicago.

Good luck,

M.


Also: At least in regards to funding, I know that George Mason struggles a bit to fund everyone. It's a little more competitive there.


(This post was edited by mchard on Jun 17, 2008, 11:33 AM)


rpc
ryan call

Jun 17, 2008, 12:58 PM

Post #8 of 1018 (32040 views)
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     Re: [mchard] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

yes, mason only has a certain number of TA slots that they can assign incoming mfa students. i dont know the exact numbers (varies each year, i think), but it is competitive, as mchard says. that said, its a great program - i entered without funding three years ago and worked into a ta slot my last two yrs.


<HTMLGIANT>


moomoocow42


Jun 17, 2008, 1:01 PM

Post #9 of 1018 (32038 views)
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     Re: [mchard] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

Thank you so much everyone for the extremely valuable advice. I will definitely have to revise my list and revisit several of the schools mentioned -- it also looks like I will have some convincing of the girlfriend to do!

~Eric


My MFA Blog -- Watch me slowly lose my sanity.


scheherazade


Jun 17, 2008, 4:29 PM

Post #10 of 1018 (32001 views)
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     Best Funded Programs [In reply to]  

So for those of us without geographical limitations, which schools offer "full" or significant funding? i.e., Tuition waiver, TAship or fellowship to cover most/all tuition expenses and provide some money to live on, leaving expenses which can otherwise be covered by reasonable part-time employment. This funding doesn't need to be offered to every student, but the school must at least offer a possibility that a student might be able to attend this school without accruing any/much debt or finding a sugar-daddy.

I'm trying to put together a comprehensive list, so please add to or remove from the following:

University of Alabama
University of Arkansas
Bowling Green
Brown University
University of California, Davis
University of California, Irvine
Cornell University
Florida State University
University of Florida
George Mason University
University of Georgia
University of Houston
Indiana University
University of Iowa
Iowa State University
Johns Hopkins University
Louisiana State University
McNeese State University
University of Michigan
University of Minnesota
Minnesota State University, Mankato
University of Mississippi
University of Montana
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
University of New Mexico
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Notre Dame University
Ohio State University
University of Oregon
Purdue University
Syracuse University
University of Texas, Michener Center
University of Texas (MA program)
Texas State University
University of Utah
Vanderbilt University
University of Virginia
Virginia Commonwealth University
University of Washington
Washington University, St. Louis
West Virginia University
University of Wisconsin, Madisn


ejdifili
Emily

Jun 17, 2008, 6:24 PM

Post #11 of 1018 (31981 views)
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     Re: [scheherazade] Best Funded Programs [In reply to]  

While Notre Dame does offer tuition remission to all CW students, only one person in each genre receives a TAship. So, I guess it does qualify as offering a chance of the full funding that was being described, but it's a slim one.


vivalettelaviv


Jun 18, 2008, 3:01 AM

Post #12 of 1018 (31929 views)
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     Re: [ejdifili] Best Funded Programs [In reply to]  

Actually, Notre Dame offers fellowships to half their students. There is a Prose Fellow, a Poetry Fellow, a Nicholas Sparks Fellow, who works on their lit mag, multiple University Fellowships (two this year, though that number might fluctuate), and every other year, there is a fellowship for a student who essentially becomes a personal assistant to the Program Director. So, roughly 5 or 6 fellowships are distributed throughout an incoming class of 10 to 12.


Dime49


Jun 18, 2008, 3:08 PM

Post #13 of 1018 (31866 views)
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     Re: [scheherazade] Best Funded Programs [In reply to]  

Arizona State fully funds all its students as well.


SevenFreckles


Jun 19, 2008, 5:28 PM

Post #14 of 1018 (31749 views)
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     Research [In reply to]  

I'm still in the midst of researching my schools for my '09 applications and I was hoping for some insight on this issue. Right now I'm looking at about twenty or so programs that I'm going to narrow it down from. I did one round of applications the year before last, but have changed my genre from fiction to poetry. So I'm pretty familiar with most of the top programs, at least in some aspects. I'm going through websites, looking at faculty, and trying to find poets that I feel I mesh with on on some level. But with approximately twenty programs it's turning into a significant amount of reading, not to mention money spent on books. How familiar with faculty's work do you think you should be during the application process? I found Poets.org to be a good resource, but I'm not sure I can really get a feel for someone's style after only one or two poems. And truthfully, while I'm reading -a lot- of poetry right now, I haven't read a ton of it in the past... so I feel horribly uneducated and disadvantaged. And rather overwhelmed. Maybe I'm just not pacing myself? I don't know. I don't like to do things halfway, and don't want to look back and realize that I didn't put enough effort into my research (part of the problem with my last attempt)... but I think I need a better attack plan or something.

Sorry for this long, rambling post. Any thoughts on the subject are welcome! Thanks!


unsaid78


Jun 19, 2008, 8:17 PM

Post #15 of 1018 (31723 views)
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     Re: [SevenFreckles] Research [In reply to]  

I'm going to be applying for the first time for Fall '09 in Poetry(but I've been stalking these boards for 2 years). I'm trying to narrow down about 20 schools too!

As far as the faculty's work I actually worked backwards. I looked up poets whom I liked to see where they were teaching and added those schools to the list so that's something you might try. Who are you already familiar with? Where do they teach? I chose at least 4 of the schools on my list this way (NYU- Olds and Komunyakaa, SIUC- Allison Joseph, Virginia Tech- Nikki Giovanni, University of Houston- Mark Doty).

Just a thought. Good luck whittling things down!


www.mfachronicles.blogspot.com - Follow us as we begin our 1st years in MFA programs!


ejdifili
Emily

Jun 19, 2008, 10:00 PM

Post #16 of 1018 (31707 views)
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     Re: [SevenFreckles] Research [In reply to]  

Reading your prospective professors' work is definitely a good idea. Or, just do a search and find out where some poets you already respect are teaching. I wouldn't think you'd have to read ALL the professors' work in ALL programs where you apply. I'm in fiction, so that was definitely impossible for me when I was doing my apps. You could, however, read about their work just to get an idea of what they're doing. Like, if you're into experimental writing, then you probably want to study somewhere that has a more "experimental" faculty. I applied to some programs because I enjoyed the work of the people who taught there, and to others for different reasons such as location, funding, etc.

Keep in mind, too, that sometimes professors go on sabbatical, change schools or whatever. So, just because they're listed as faculty doesn't guarantee that you'll get to work with them. Also, even though you might love someone's work, you may not necessarily mesh with them personally or benefit from their teaching style.

Another idea is to look up the alma maters of contemporary writers you enjoy. I applied to the program I'll be attending in the fall largely because of an alumnus whose work I admire.


SevenFreckles


Jun 20, 2008, 12:19 AM

Post #17 of 1018 (31685 views)
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     Re: [ejdifili] Research [In reply to]  

Thanks for the suggestions. That backwards method sounds useful. I suppose part of the problem is that I'm also trying to make up for the fact that I'm woefully unfamiliar with contemporary poetry. I mean, I do and always have read poetry, and there are a lot of poems that really resonate with me... but not a lot of poets whose work as a whole I identify with. And I'm trying to change that. I guess it's all part of working on becoming a better writer. But I feel pretty in the dark when people mention world famous, legendary so-and-so and I have to go google him or her because I have no idea who they are. If only I had been an English major in undergrad... sigh. :)

On another note, does anyone know of any other lists or rankings of strong poetry programs? I found the 2008 P&W Reader Poll, but wonder if there are any others that break it up into genre. Or even an article or something. I'm not too concerned about rankings (I look, of course, but it's not my top priority) but they're a good reference and starting point for getting ideas. It seems that according to that one poll a lot of the programs I was considering when applying for fiction didn't even make the list. Hmm. It makes sense to me that some programs would be known more for one genre or the other, but maybe not...

I guess while I'm at it with another long post I'll include my list that I'm trying to pare down.

Alabama
Western Washington
Bowling Green
Cornell
Greenboro
Georgia
Hollins
Houston
Iowa
Michener Center
Michigan
Montana
Notre Dame
Oregon
Syracuse
Virginia

Thanks again!


Vesuvia


Jun 20, 2008, 12:32 AM

Post #18 of 1018 (31684 views)
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     Re: [moomoocow42] Choosing an MFA Program (2009) [In reply to]  

You should look at the University of Minnesota -- I'm headed there in the fall, so I don't yet have the perspective of someone who's been through the program, but I can speak for its funding package -- ALL students receive tuition remission, a 3-year TAship & stipend (definitely livable), and comprehensive health insurance, and there is the possibility of additional fellowships as well. The faculty has been very helpful and friendly so far, and they've got some great writers there. As Tom Kealey notes, the program is young-ish (about 10 years old, I think), which is one reason why it's not as highly ranked as he thinks it should be, and I imagine that in a couple years it'll rise in the rankings as well. In terms of its selectivity, I believe this year approximate 5% of applicants were admitted.

I'm currently in Chicago as well, and from my few visits to the Twin Cities, I've gotten a great vibe from the friendly, laid back, creative people, and I've heard that the Twin Cities are great for the arts, especially literature, visual art, and music. Though not as large as Chicago, I think (I hope!) that Chicagoans would thrive in Minneapolis. I'm also bringing along my significant other, who will need to find some work, and I don't think he'll have any problems.

If you (or anyone else) wants any more info about UMN, especially over the next few months as I actually start the program and as application time nears, I'm happy to be a resource.


unsaid78


Jun 20, 2008, 4:20 AM

Post #19 of 1018 (31671 views)
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     Re: [SevenFreckles] Research [In reply to]  

Sorry, can't help you on a poetry ranking. Would be nice though. :) Oh and as far as getting to know poets without majoring in English, I suggest going to poetry readings. I've gotten more knowledge of poets through readings than I did as an undergrad English major. If you live near a campus with a creative writing program they probably have readings scheduled. Or check with bookstores. That way you get the chance to mingle with the poets and hear their work. Just an idea. Here's my long list that changes almost daily:

Definitely Applying Here:
Cornell
Florida State
Indiana
NYU
Michener
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Southern Illinois Carbondale
Virginia Tech
McNeese
USC (MPW)

More Than Likely Also Applying Here:

Vanderbilt
Boise State
University of Oregon
University of Virginia
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
University of Houston
Arizona State, Tempe

Also Considering:
Iowa
Notre Dame
University of Florida
University of Washington
UC Irvine


For poetry.


www.mfachronicles.blogspot.com - Follow us as we begin our 1st years in MFA programs!


Raignn



Jun 20, 2008, 11:49 AM

Post #20 of 1018 (31642 views)
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     Re: MidWest Schools [In reply to]  

I only applied to schools in the Midwest last year and would like to provide some insight to those considering any of the following schools. Most of my insight is poetry, but some fiction information can be gleaned from what I know. Don't discount the Midwest! There are some really excellent programs in this part of the country and although some might not be in the most glamourous of locations, definitely check them out.

1. University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana -- This is the school I ultimately chose out of the several I ended up getting into. This school has amazing funding (really, it's amazing), you get to teach, but not too much, the faculty to student ratio is incredible (four poetry faculty, only three incoming poets a year), plus instead of teaching you can work on The Ninth Letter (which is also awesome). Plus you're two hours from three very major cities (Chicago, Indianapolis, St. Louis). The program is quite new, which is why it doesn't end up on many people's list, but I highly recommend everyone check it out. This is a three year program.

2. Purdue University -- I went to Purdue as an undergrad. They also offer excellent, full funding to everyone, have a great set of faculty lined up, the Sycamore Review, and other perks. I also highly recommendthis program. This is a three year program.

3. Ohio State -- I almost went here. Full funding, incredibly nice people, great faculty. I highly recommend this program as well. This is a three year program.

4. Western Michigan -- Great program, super nice people, great town, great faculty. The problem is they don't offer full funding. It's almost full funding so it's totally doable, but for someone who wasn't willing to spend a dime on their MFA it was what broke the deal for me. They do accept some people without funding, but they generally are able to find funding for everyone. But, they do have the Prague program (sooo hard to turn down) and Third Coast. I do really recommend this program, they are very well thought of. This is a three year program.

5. Indiana University -- They have full funding, but this can be a tough one. It's a great program, but they are focused on diversity (for good or for bad), and frankly I found them to be less than helpful during the process (I was waitlisted).. take that as you will. They do have an excellent program with great writers. This is a three year program.

6. Pittsburgh -- Yes, Pittsburgh is a great program. However, be aware, they accept a lot of people and only 1 maybe 2 out of each genre are funded. I was something like 15th on the list for funding when I was accepted. Then they sort of tell you to go find your own funding. I found them to be less than helpful during the whole process and was very turned off by their whole "you should come to our program because we are Pittsburgh" attitude. That being said, my best friend got her MFA from Pitt, did receive full funding, and came out a great writer. If I could do it all over again I wouldn't have even bothered with Pitts, but that's just my experience. This is a three year program.

Hopefully this helps those out there!


RaoulDuke
Cobra Cobachi

Jun 20, 2008, 11:50 AM

Post #21 of 1018 (31638 views)
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     Re: [unsaid78] Research [In reply to]  

Hey guys,

I strongly encourage poets and fiction writers alike to give serious consideration to Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. I was 10th on the waitlist out of 10, and after seven long months of waiting I have been admitted (for fiction) with a fully funded TA position. Needless to say, they are AWESOME for funding. They make great strides for their students and so far I have had nothing but great experiences with the staff and faculty there, sight unseen.

Pinckney Benedict is the MFA director, and a hell of a writer (fiction). You may have heard of him, he studied under Joyce Carol Oates at Princeton and is described as "raw and emotional, Benedict crafts his prose with a decidedly masculine voice. The characters are gritty, the action is razor-sharp and the defining landscape is unnervingly real. Benedict recognizes in his native West Virginia a terrain rich with storytelling material. As Joyce Carol Oates writes in her introduction to The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 'indeed, in writers so clearly linked to an idiomatic oral tradition as Flannery O'Connor and the young West Virginian Pinckney Benedict, place is voice.'"

The poetry faculty is equally renowned. Consider the following awards recently bestowed upon Rodney Jones and Allison Joseph:

  • Professor Rodney Jones is the 2007 recipient of the Kingsley Tufts Prize in Poetry.
    This annual award, given to a poet in mid-career, is a prize of $100,000.
  • Associate Allison Joseph was awarded the Writecorner Poetry Prize for her poem
    "A Love Note to Teenagers"--read the poem at www.writecorner.com

  • Associate Professor Allison Joseph is an award winner in the 2006 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg
    Poetry Competition. She will be awarded $5000 for her poems "Cartography" and "Emergency Librarian."
  • Associate Professor Allison Joseph was awarded a $7000 Artists Fellowship in Poetry for 2007 from the Illinois Arts Council.
The Kingsley Tufts Prize is pretty sweet, huh?

I'm done with my sales pitch, but I just want 2009 applicants to know how awesome this program has been, and will continue to be, for years to come. It is truly an up and coming program, placed by some in the top 50 for MFA programs. Take a look at the programs website by going here:

http://www.siu.edu/departments/english/Academic%20Areas/Creative%20Writing/CreativeWriting.html

Good luck, people, and like I said in the "I'M IN" thread: expect the unexpected, you can't script the MFA application process.

Sincerely,
Richard


writerteacher


Jun 20, 2008, 1:05 PM

Post #22 of 1018 (31613 views)
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     Re: [SevenFreckles] Research [In reply to]  

Consider Virginia Commonwealth University. Fully funded for 80% of students, 3-year program run by poet David Wojahn, a Pulitzer finalist last year. Claudia Emerson (who won the Pulitzer the year David was a finalist) is teaching next year; I can't remember the name of the poet they hired to start teaching in 2009, but she's a "big name" (sorry, I'm a fictioneer). Top-notch visiting writers and readers series, exceptional lit journal, plenty of teaching and editing opportunities, super town, etc.

I've written elsewhere in the MFA forum about the many attributes of the VCU MFA program, but if you have any particular questions, you can PM me. There's more info at the Web site:

http://www.has.vcu.edu/eng/graduate/mfa.htm

Best,
WT


jacarty
Jessie Carty
e-mail user

Jun 20, 2008, 2:53 PM

Post #23 of 1018 (31583 views)
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     Re: [richardkae] Research [In reply to]  

I've been out of the mix for while but Pinckney Benedict is awesome!
He does several seminars in the Low Res Program at Queens and I just love when I see his name on the roster :)

This is a great site, btw, for people just starting out the search. Helped me immensely and now I will graduate in January. Wooo hoo!!


http://jessiecarty.com


RaoulDuke
Cobra Cobachi

Jun 20, 2008, 4:14 PM

Post #24 of 1018 (31569 views)
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     Re: [jacarty] Research [In reply to]  

Hey Jacarty,

I'm pumped to have my first MFA WS with him in the Fall. I feel blessed :-)


Good luck with your research.


Rick


Brokenmoped


Jun 21, 2008, 2:45 AM

Post #25 of 1018 (31526 views)
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     Literary Mags [In reply to]  

I'm considering applying for MFA programs for 2010, but I figured I'd try to get ahead of the game. Maybe someone can help me out... I'm looking for programs that offer editorial positions on lit mags rather than TA positions. This is mainly because I'm pretty sure I would make a horrible teacher. Are there mid-top tier MFA programs that offer this kind of job/funding?

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