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bighark


Jan 11, 2010, 12:28 AM

Post #26 of 59 (4436 views)
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Re: [ericweinstein] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Nope. Every writing school in the country wants the best students. The methods for judging applications may vary from place to place--and this explains why someone gets accepted to Prestige U. but not Legacy U. or even Upstart U.--but every faculty at every school does things the same way.


insertbrackets

e-mail user

Jan 11, 2010, 3:25 AM

Post #27 of 59 (4403 views)
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Re: [bighark] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm currently sitting pretty at OSU with full funding, critiquing poems and responding to my students' work but thought I might chime in here with can best be described as my pears o'wisdom.

What I Learned:

1. There are no guarantees (accept that everyone applies to Iowa): Well, almost everyone. You cannot predict what will happen. I applied to 12 schools, accepted at 3. One school got 50 applications in poetry, another got 200, an another got closer to 400. I made into the top 6 picks for all of them. The other 9? Flat out rejections. It's like shooting blindly into a cave. You may or may not hit something.

2. Research matters: I am crazy and obsessive. I plan things out in advance. I figured out where I was applying by July of last year before I applied, and turned in my apps to all my schools two weeks ahead of the earliest deadlines. I knew the schools inside and out, their requirements, their pluses and minuses, how much their stipends amounted too. Now with Seth's blog effectively out of commission, your jobs all got a lot harder, but there's still ways of getting info when and where you need it.

3. Apply to schools that matter to you for whatever reasons they do: I applied to OSU because the idea of working with Andre Hudgins and Henri Cole, plus the guarantee of full funding, in a part of the country I've never lived (but could definitely live) in, the guarantee of a teaching job, and the chance to be affiliated with a large university, mattered a lot to me. It seems to me OSU will become (and is becoming) a very respected program that applicants just haven't discovered yet. I have no delusions that prestige short of Iowa will help me get a job anywhere, but it gives me satisfaction to know that others covet what I have. I guess I am just a sick bastard who likes to know others are jealous, hah!

4. The GRE is bullshit: case closed. Especially the math. That crack is whack! Stressing out about that test at the expense of any other part of your application is the dimmest move you can make. NO ONE GIVES A SHIT, ETS HAS A SHIV PRESSED AGAINST THE THROAT'S OF MANY UNIVERSITIES. THEY WANT THEIR BLOOD MONEY. "THEY FEED THEY LION, AND THEY LION GROW" (extra credit if you know where that quote came from)

5. Online statuses are also bullshit: case double closed. Always email or call human beings. They are still there behind their wall of emails and automated phone menus. You just might have to circumvent the system to contact an actual breathing person, and not just their unemotive, listless, monophonic voice.

6. Have a distraction: for me it was still BEING IN SCHOOL AKA POTTY TRAINING AND PLAYING WITH LEGOS...that joke was for the agists out there. I hear you making your juvenile remarks about juvies like me. Other options include watching LOST, MAD MEN, 30 ROCK, THE OFFICE (BBC OR US OR BOTH), BATTLESTAR GALACTICA, BREAKING BAD, GLEE, MODERN FAMILY, FUTURAMA or some other lovely show on DVD. Drinking, murder, dog whispering, picking up a new language, fornicated with strangers abroad, or building a model airplane should do the job too. Oh, writing always helps too, unless, like me, you were PETRIFIED WITH FEAR THAT YOU WERE A FAILURE AFTER TURNING IN YOUR APPS AND VOWED AS GOD AS MY WITNESS I WILL NEVER WRITE AGAIN...a vow you announce immediately after (fingers crossed) your first acceptance, at which point you rapidly conclude that, far from a failure, you are actually THE SHIT...at least until you show up to your first grad workshop. Hahaha.....oh I made myself sad.

7. Your online friends are now your best friends: because they know exactly what you are going through and (this is critical) CARE, or at least pretend to as they conduct voodoo rituals and pray to Aries, Anubis, Quezacoatl or Kali to take you out of the equation. Sure your friends and family and non-writer peeps and paramours and mistresses (or as it was in my case) manstresses are there for you, but they don't know why this little arts degree is so important to you. We do, and we want to welcome you into our cozy bosom. We love you...just so long as things work out for all of us. Don't be surprised when things go sour for some and people start contemplating existential ennui and ritualistic seppuku publicly while cursing you out in the broadest way possible. It's just what happens, the name of the game as the dull cliche goes.

Good luck kids! Oh and if you applied to OSU...just know you'll be hearing from us real soon. The scuttlebutt around here is that acceptances across all genres should go out by the end of the month. But then if you looked at what's left of Seth's blog, the pattern he has recorded would make that very clear to you.

See y'all on down the trails!


Who told you I was a racist? Was it...a minority?
-T-Rex, qwantz.com Dinosaur Comics


NickMcRae
Nick McRae

e-mail user

Jan 11, 2010, 7:13 AM

Post #28 of 59 (4391 views)
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Re: [insertbrackets] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Great post, Tory! :)

NM


"You got a song, man, sing it. / You got a bell, man, ring it." - Robert Creeley

Nick McRae
nmcrae1@gmail.com
http://nickmcrae.com/


emilychristine
Emily Sims

e-mail user

Jan 12, 2010, 5:46 PM

Post #29 of 59 (4247 views)
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Re: [NickMcRae] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

What have i learned? Hmmm....

I have learned that I am the most impatient (least patient?) person I know, and I'm okay with that, because what I want is usually pretty damn important.

I have learned that my heart rushes every time I get an email informing me someone on the P&W forum has replied to my post.

I have learned that letting my mother read something I wrote is not the end of the world. I mean, it's close, obviously, but I didn't burst into flames.

I have learned that no one understands, except you. And my cat. Nala understands every damn thing I've ever told her since 1994.

I have learned that while white wine and chocolate are the most appealing friends while working on writing samples, Diet Coke and pretzels are the better way to go.

I have learned that even though the mail only comes once a day, it should really come three or four times. In fact, the mail man should just knock on your damn door and tell you whether or not there's a letter from Irvine. I mean, we need to know.

I have learned how to circumvent the Internet blocks at the public high school where I work so I can religiously check my gmail all day long... just in case.

I have learned not to lurk.

I have learned to be a better teacher, because my own irrational anxieties enable me to better empathize with all of theirs. Basically, I've reverted to the emotional maturity of a 15 year old.

But most of all, I have learned not just to put myself out there, but to own the fact that I've put myself out there.

Emily
PS. If I get into a program, I want a t-shirt that says "I survived the MFA application process."


Our Daily Tales / Travel Tales



In The Lobby


Jan 12, 2010, 5:53 PM

Post #30 of 59 (4242 views)
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Re: [emcsims] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Ha! Perfection! You words needs to be lacquered on the back of every glass bottle of Shatto across America.


Woon


Jan 12, 2010, 5:58 PM

Post #31 of 59 (4239 views)
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Re: [emcsims] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

At the risk of offending many of you, I don't understand what the big deal with all the angst about MFA applications. It seemed very routine and straightforward to me. I researched and applied to 13 schools. I sent out for my transcripts from my undergrad. I asked some of my former teachers if they could write letters of rec for me. I studied for, took the GRE, and did well. I finalized some short stories. I drafted my Statement of Purpose (or Personal Statement). I applied online. To me, it was all fun and I hardly broke a sweat.

If I don't get in, it's not the end of the world. It's an art degree, for pete's sake. We all have options, whether you believe it or not, if the MFA doesn't work out.

I mean, there's always Optometry school.


In The Lobby


Jan 12, 2010, 6:08 PM

Post #32 of 59 (4231 views)
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Re: [Woon] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I broke a sweat and burnt 340 calories just reading your first paragraph. No worries, I'm not offended. It's just that for me, it's either an art degree or podiatrist assistant certification. Optometry? I could only be so lucky! :D


gg.scholastica
Gena Goodman


Jan 12, 2010, 7:56 PM

Post #33 of 59 (4200 views)
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Re: [Woon] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Not offended, but certain that you're more organized, or at least less ruffled by small things, than I am. Mine went more like this: Pick stories. Re-pick stories. Ask people. Get conflicting opinions. Re-pick stories. Un re-pick stories. Suggest to excellent prof. I won't need her ref. Unsuggest, luckily she's forgotten. Wrangle up others, try to put together packets... later than I'd hoped. Realize I sent the wrong deadline, chase them down. Order transcripts. Forget transcripts before going on vacation. Apply to some schools with deadlines RIGHT NOW. Run out of ink... but not really. Find missing ink cartridge. Apply to others, transcripts obviously missing... Realize put wrong address on [second] GRE registration, which is why I have yet to get my score report (I mean, WTF-- I've only written it correctly 1x10^20 times). Send GREs. Apply to more schools, some with random extra forms that ask me questions about life and teaching for which I have no answers. Quickly hack stories apart to fit tiny page requirements. Move back, forget to email some stories/SoPs/important shit! to new computer. Find someone to email them to me. Pay exorbitant USPS fees, only to be told today, upon my last mailing, that it would've been cheaper to use a flat rate envelope. D'oh, now you tell me.

I admit that every stress-inducing thing that happened concerning applications was my fault (with a few exceptions...) but my first (and hopefully last) application season was not as calm, cool, or collected as yours, Woon. I envy your stride, and I'm sure it'll pay off during your MFA, as well.

-G

PS-- random rant did not include the amount of time last year and this summer I spent searching websites for accurate information, or the fact that because of that, I asked for paper recs for a school who decided to switch to all-electronic recs recently. Should have seen that one coming. Advice for future crazies attempting MFA: check the websites, often. Don't shirk making detailed graphs of who-needs-what-in-what-quantity-when.


clinfort


Jan 12, 2010, 10:00 PM

Post #34 of 59 (4170 views)
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Re: [gg.scholastica] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi all, this is cross-posted with the MFA blog:

RE: Writing sample

Last year I was accepted into three (out of three) MFA programs: UNH, Northern Michigan, and Oregon State off the waitlist. I ended up at NMU for funding reasons.

Half of my writing sample was already published in a literary journal (Denver Quarterly). If you guys want to compare samples check it out. It's in issue 43:1, and also recently uploaded to Kindle and Kindle for PC and iphone here:

http://www.amazon.com/Father-Crowd-ebook/dp/B0033PRYBM/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1263351104&sr=8-6

Best of luck to all applicants





In Reply To
Not offended, but certain that you're more organized, or at least less ruffled by small things, than I am. Mine went more like this: Pick stories. Re-pick stories. Ask people. Get conflicting opinions. Re-pick stories. Un re-pick stories. Suggest to excellent prof. I won't need her ref. Unsuggest, luckily she's forgotten. Wrangle up others, try to put together packets... later than I'd hoped. Realize I sent the wrong deadline, chase them down. Order transcripts. Forget transcripts before going on vacation. Apply to some schools with deadlines RIGHT NOW. Run out of ink... but not really. Find missing ink cartridge. Apply to others, transcripts obviously missing... Realize put wrong address on [second] GRE registration, which is why I have yet to get my score report (I mean, WTF-- I've only written it correctly 1x10^20 times). Send GREs. Apply to more schools, some with random extra forms that ask me questions about life and teaching for which I have no answers. Quickly hack stories apart to fit tiny page requirements. Move back, forget to email some stories/SoPs/important shit! to new computer. Find someone to email them to me. Pay exorbitant USPS fees, only to be told today, upon my last mailing, that it would've been cheaper to use a flat rate envelope. D'oh, now you tell me.

I admit that every stress-inducing thing that happened concerning applications was my fault (with a few exceptions...) but my first (and hopefully last) application season was not as calm, cool, or collected as yours, Woon. I envy your stride, and I'm sure it'll pay off during your MFA, as well.

-G

PS-- random rant did not include the amount of time last year and this summer I spent searching websites for accurate information, or the fact that because of that, I asked for paper recs for a school who decided to switch to all-electronic recs recently. Should have seen that one coming. Advice for future crazies attempting MFA: check the websites, often. Don't shirk making detailed graphs of who-needs-what-in-what-quantity-when.



Zuleika Dobson


e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 1:04 AM

Post #35 of 59 (4133 views)
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Re: [gg.scholastica] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Since hindsight is 20/20, I'll probably have a fantastic answer to this question in April.

But so far, I have definitely found out how crucial it is to build a strong portfolio of shorter pieces to choose from. I spent 15 months slaving away on a novel, which is not really the preferred writing sample for Admissions Committees. I should have focused on producing a handful of very solid short stories and then asking trustworthy friends for their top 3 picks.

And I should have been savoring the work of contemporary writers instead of a bunch of dead guys.


"Every spectator is a coward or a traitor."


aiyamei

e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 6:37 AM

Post #36 of 59 (4114 views)
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Re: [Zuleika Dobson] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I spent 15 months slaving away on a novel, which is not really the preferred writing sample for Admissions Committees. I should have focused on producing a handful of very solid short stories and then asking trustworthy friends for their top 3 picks.

And I should have been savoring the work of contemporary writers instead of a bunch of dead guys.


For some reason this response makes me so sad. I hope you are not serious. I hope what you mean is, "the fact that I was pursuing the things that actual writers pursue rather than jumping through arbitrary hoops and being the good trained poodle the MFA system sometimes asks young writers to be -- that was sometimes impractical, but oh well!" rather than actually suggesting that people should start reading politically (it would be an impossibility for there to be as many great writers working today as there have been cumulatively over the past two thousand years, no?) and frankly, writing a novel rather than short stories is only smart.

I just hope everyone will keep perspective through all this. These schools are making you jump. To jump when someone says jump is sometimes a good thing to know how to do; it's a means to a highly desired end. But as writers, you must learn not to mistake obedience for virtue. You must learn to preserve your own tastes, standards, and ideals.

Writing includes MFA programs, but it's much more than MFA programs. Don't forget!


rain_raine


Jan 13, 2010, 10:16 AM

Post #37 of 59 (4070 views)
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Re: [aiyamei] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I'd like to second what aiyamei said. After jumping through all of those application hoops, I'm just getting back to writing and it feels wonderful. I think some of the application hoops are helpful: writing the statement of purpose, descriptions of my writing background, and even teaching statements have made me much more self-aware, and I think I am becoming a better writer because of it. I also managed to whip out a couple short-shorts, and the first draft of a slightly longer piece while working on applications, but this past week I've been doing some second/third draft writing, which feels like real writing for me. (My first drafts tend to be much more like sketches, even the sentences tend to be shorter. In the second or third draft the story begins to really develop and take shape, and it feels great to see that happening again.)

In terms of general application advice, then, I'd say that an important one is to try and get back to writing as soon after the applications are finished as you can. Writing will remind you that you are a writer, no matter what the outcome of your applications turns out to be.

More specific, nit-picky application advice:

-Submit applications early
-Avoid using USPS around their busy days, this means both the date you drop it in the mail and the date it's supposed to arrive (this year their busiest day was Dec. 14, and, probably as a result of mailworkers being so busy, my arrival confirmation for one application didn't work, leading to a week of solid freaking out)
-Make a spreadsheet ahead of time of the date you will mail each application. In making this, double check whether each due date is a postmark date or an arrival date, and adjust your mailing date accordingly. (I didn't do this last one, but I would have freaked out less if I had.)


ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Jan 13, 2010, 11:22 AM

Post #38 of 59 (4050 views)
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Re: [rain_raine] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Thirded. I hadn't realized how little attention I was paying to new writing during the application process until it was all over. I wrote nearly a dozen poems in the weeks after I finished my apps, some of which were actually good.


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


lily_lee


Jan 13, 2010, 12:57 PM

Post #39 of 59 (4022 views)
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Re: What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

thank you, aiyamei. i'm submitting a novel excerpt and well understand this may foul up my chances with MFA committees who prefer short stories. Yet this - and whether I get accepted somewhere or not - has absolutely no bearing on my current and continued commitment to novel-writing!

Novelists wrote things of great beauty centuries before MFA's were invented...as did short story writers and poets, of course. I honestly think some applicants lose perspective about the meaning of an MFA or the permission it gives you to do certain things (no-one here! but some)...



lily_lee


Jan 13, 2010, 1:02 PM

Post #40 of 59 (4019 views)
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Re: What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Er, sorry if that sounded rude - it really wasn't meant to be. also just scrolled up and saw Tory's post - absolutely excellent!


Zuleika Dobson


e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 1:53 PM

Post #41 of 59 (3999 views)
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Re: [aiyamei] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

This is not so much a defense as an attempt at clarification...

My decision to apply to an MFA this year was relatively last-minute (October), and I think I ended up extremely unprepared for many reasons. My novel was far from being 'ready' and polished enough to actually send off, and I desperately wanted to be able to choose from a variety of short stories. The problem was I had none at the time, and then only had 2 later on. I have been a poet for pretty much the entirety of my life and within the past two years, had written a play and had been working on this novel. I didn't want to send this piece off, but felt I had no other options.

I was at a loss when discussing contemporary writers in the SOP because while I am fairly comfortable with contemporary poets and 19th-20th century fiction writers, I've read too little from contemporary fiction writers to give a fair answer. I'm completely out of the loop.

I'm not trying to be political and strategic, but I did not treat the MFA application as seriously as I should have. I am trying to be realistic in order to face the consequences of my haste and poor preparation. Thus, I don't expect MFA acceptances, but in case any programs are impervious to the faults of my submissions... of course I'd be thrilled.


"Every spectator is a coward or a traitor."

(This post was edited by Zuleika Dobson on Jan 13, 2010, 1:56 PM)


ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Jan 13, 2010, 1:57 PM

Post #42 of 59 (3993 views)
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Re: [Zuleika Dobson] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I have been a poet for pretty much the entirety of my life and within the past two years, had written a play and had been working on this novel.



Out of curiosity: why didn't you apply to MFA programs in poetry?


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


aiyamei

e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 2:17 PM

Post #43 of 59 (3978 views)
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Re: [Zuleika Dobson] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I didn't mean you should defend yourself. If anything the opposite: I meant that it sounded to me like you were doing all the right things beforehand, and what you 'should' be doing for the MFA apps, well, I get it, but still...don't blow it out of proportion.


Zuleika Dobson


e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 2:32 PM

Post #44 of 59 (3970 views)
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Re: [aiyamei] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I understand what you meant. But the problem is actually that I didn't do the right things beforehand, and know that I should have spent time working on developing a larger pool of writing samples and being better acquainted with the work of contemporaries and MFA professors, neither of which would have been a political/strategic maneuver solely for the purpose of the MFA. Though of course it would help tremendously.


"Every spectator is a coward or a traitor."


Zuleika Dobson


e-mail user

Jan 13, 2010, 2:33 PM

Post #45 of 59 (3966 views)
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Re: [ericweinstein] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

I guess since the answer consists solely of reasons not germane to this discussion topic, I'll PM you.


"Every spectator is a coward or a traitor."


ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Jan 14, 2010, 11:03 AM

Post #46 of 59 (3857 views)
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Re: [bighark] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Nope. Every writing school in the country wants the best students. The methods for judging applications may vary from place to place--and this explains why someone gets accepted to Prestige U. but not Legacy U. or even Upstart U.--but every faculty at every school does things the same way.



Right, but numerically speaking, some schools are more selective than others—i.e., if School A takes 30 applicants from a pool of 500 (6% acceptance rate) and School B takes 10 from a pool of 500 (2% acceptance rate), then School B is, ceteris paribus, more selective than School A.

I'm not saying this means School B is better than School A for being more selective, but it stands to reason that, in general, applying to schools with higher acceptance rates increases one's chances of being accepted.


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


bighark


Jan 14, 2010, 12:23 PM

Post #47 of 59 (3835 views)
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Re: [ericweinstein] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Look, we're talking about art school. If this were a discussion about law school or an MBA program, where objective criteria like GPAs and standardized test scores are considered, then perhaps selectivity could be a useful figure. In this case, it isn't.

There's no way to measure the strength of your application relative to all other applications. Furthermore, this notion of selectivity suggests that if you're good enough to get in to the school with the 2% acceptance rate then you'd also be accepted to the school with the 6% acceptance rate, and history has shown that this is not the case.

Take the following post, for instance: http://www.pw.org/speakeasy/gforum.cgi?post=271488;#271488.

Scenarios like the one above play out on this board year after year.


ericweinstein
Eric Weinstein


Jan 14, 2010, 12:51 PM

Post #48 of 59 (3821 views)
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Re: [bighark] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

What I perhaps should have said, then, is "don't apply to programs you think (for whatever reason) you have a better shot of getting into, but wouldn't be thrilled about attending if accepted."


Hans Landa: You'll be shot for this!
Aldo Raine: Nah, I don't think so. More like chewed out. I've been chewed out before.


JohnGradyCole


Jan 18, 2010, 9:52 PM

Post #49 of 59 (3648 views)
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Re: [emcsims] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

Who doesn't love unsolicited advice?! Who, I ask you?! Here's mine.

* Waste time, and don't feel bad about it, but remember: moderation. Do your work. Don't be a lazy dummy.

* Save your money for app fees, and do it early and often. The first time I applied to fiction programs, I was so caught up in my manuscript and statements of purpose and whatnot that I didn't give a second thought to money after deciding early on that, yes, I can probably afford to apply to X number of programs. I ended up putting everything on the credit card mere weeks before getting laid off. Whoops. This time around, my total amount spent on MFA apps was $400. Thanks to literally stashing a set amount of cash a week into my mattress, I didn't have to put a dime on the CC. Hooray for interest-free peace of mind.

* There are many, many folks who applied but didn't get accepted the first time around, and are giving it another go. Seek these people out. Share war stories.

* Dig up any information you can on program acceptance rates. Be optimistic, but for heaven's sake be practical.

* @gg.scholastica, I totally echo the awesomeness and utility of making a big ol' spreadsheet of requirements and deadlines for each program to which you're applying. Every time I finished an app requirement, I colored its Excel cell green. Beholding my entirely green spreadsheet after I mailed off my last application was enormously satisfying.

* You are not entitled to anything. Repeat.

* If you don't get accepted, let yourself be sad, then figure out what to do differently, then try again. Do it in that order, but don't spend six months doing the first part and then rush to squeeze the second two parts in before the end of December. I felt better as soon as I started working on new fiction after getting universally rejected, but I still allowed myself to emotionally work up to it, which sounds stupid, but you know what, your face sounds stupid!!

* Antique stores are a great place to find super cheap contemporary fiction. (Subtext: read, read, read!)

* If the clock's ticking and it becomes necessary to hound your recommendation writers, then by all means hound away. I know a lot of hands are wrung over this. The way I see it, your letter writers agreed to do something important for you, and it's not your fault if they don't adhere to that commitment, or forget about it. Don't write them nasty emails, obviously, but also at no point in any of those emails should there appear any variation on the phrase, "sorry to bother you."

* Friends who are voracious readers are just as helpful as friends who are voracious writers in terms of quality feedback. You already knew that, but it's always worth repeating.

* If anyone tells you to quit stressing between now and the end of March, remember that a stern blow to the clavicle can render a person unconscious.

* "But most of all, I have learned not just to put myself out there, but to own the fact that I've put myself out there." @emcsims: amen.


emilychristine
Emily Sims

e-mail user

Jan 18, 2010, 10:39 PM

Post #50 of 59 (3633 views)
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Re: [JohnGradyCole] What Have You Learned From the Application Process? [In reply to] Can't Post

@JohnGradyCole--Thanks for the Amen :) And I'll be using that advice about the stern blow to the clavicle. I can't tell you how many times people have told me that I just need to be patient... well, they just need to be kicked in the face!

:)


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