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hamlet3145


Jun 26, 2007, 9:10 AM

Post #451 of 764 (14602 views)
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Re: [umass76] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't know if it's "rankings" or just an article, but I had heard that as well. I'm hoping for the latter.


umass76


Jun 26, 2007, 2:39 PM

Post #452 of 764 (14571 views)
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Re: [Hamlet3145] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks, Jason. I'm hoping it's both(!)
S.


(This post was edited by umass76 on Jun 26, 2007, 2:40 PM)


__________



Jun 26, 2007, 5:36 PM

Post #453 of 764 (14542 views)
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Re: [umass76] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

Jesus. Anyone think new rankings will have a big effect on next year's applications?

And I'm not sure why you would know, but does anyone know how the US News rankings effected things in the short term?


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HopperFu


Jun 26, 2007, 5:48 PM

Post #454 of 764 (14540 views)
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Re: [Junior Maas] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Jesus. Anyone think new rankings will have a big effect on next year's applications?

I think you can safely assume that whatever the top ten or twenty programs are will get more applications because of the new rankings; if you read through the threads you'll find that most people do almost no research before actually applying.


hamlet3145


Jun 26, 2007, 6:47 PM

Post #455 of 764 (14528 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

I have to admit that I'd be curious about a new ranking, but I don't look forward to the resulting tidal wave of drama (which has more in common with rooting for and aruging about sports teams than, you know, anything having to do with writing).

Interestingly, one of The Atlantic's own doesn't buy into rankings at all.


(This post was edited by Hamlet3145 on Jun 26, 2007, 6:49 PM)


Clench Million
Charles

Jun 26, 2007, 8:40 PM

Post #456 of 764 (14512 views)
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Re: [Hamlet3145] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

But given that so many people do indeed weigh rankings into their applications (I think they should personally, as no one could practically do enough research to figure out the quality of teachers, peers, alumnae publication and status in the publishing industry for 100 schools. Rankings give you a nice way to narrow things down to a long-list which you can then further chisel to a short-list based on your own needs and research) isn't in preferable for applicants to base things on a current ranking than one that is 10 years old?

A new objective and semi-official ranking is sorely needed, I'd say.

Also, the article you linked to is not arguing that ranking should be abolished, it is arguing that schools should work together to create an official university sanctioned ranking instead of letting US News and World Reports or other magazines do the work for them. I agree with him totally there.


(This post was edited by Clench Million on Jun 26, 2007, 8:46 PM)


__________



Jun 26, 2007, 8:51 PM

Post #457 of 764 (14508 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

Damnit. I've done my research; the schools that excite me are all 'rising' or even 'one to watch!' on the Kealey and Abramson scales. Is it wrong to hope they don't fare so well?

Of ratings and hype in general, I always think of my high school buddy who left Brown and joined me at a state school during his year of poor finances. He found that academically, it was harder, the chances of getting booted, way easier. Apparently, the benefits of attending a top-ranked school arrived later, in situations created by the hype itself.

I think of that, and the guy who played Jean-Luc Picard. He got way laid not after appearing on a hit TV show, but after People ranked him as one of their Top 50 Most Beautiful People Alive!. Weird, huh?


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(This post was edited by Junior Maas on Jun 26, 2007, 8:54 PM)


Clench Million
Charles

Jun 26, 2007, 9:29 PM

Post #458 of 764 (14498 views)
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Re: [Junior Maas] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, as I've said before your peer group will most likely end up being the biggest factor in your MFA program, so maybe you should hope those schools do rank well so that the quality of your peer group's writing rises. But then it might be harder to get in, so tough call.

Rankings contain plenty of silliness and stupidity, but overall I find that the people who are vehemently against rankings and lists and star ratings on reviews tend to totally miss the picture on them. Such scores are really only meant to be guidelines or introductions to certain areas. If a magazine puts out a ranking of the top 100 books in the last 25 years, the point is to create a reference point for people to look at to maybe find something new and interesting to read. The point is not to argue that Infinite Jest is 2 places better than American Pastoral or whatever. Yet it is that aspect that tends to freak certain people out. "Ebert gave both Pirates of the Carribean and Pulp Fiction 4 stars? Oh, now I'm supposed to believe Pirates is EXACTLY as good as Pulp Fiction!?" "How can you prove to me that Bob Dylan is five places better than The Beach Boys amongst 60s acts? You can't! The list is meaningless!" etc. Missing the point.


__________



Jun 26, 2007, 10:10 PM

Post #459 of 764 (14494 views)
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Re: [Clench Million] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm actually with you on the peer group thing...though I do worry about good writers who simply apply to top 20 schools vs. well-researched folks who might share a school's known aesthetic (think of someone Iowa-bound who might instead end up at Brown or Alabama).

But school rankings are not movie reviews. They're more like the annual 50 Best Doctors! issue that got D Magazine and Texas Monthly in some local recent trouble. The rankings share the whole 'ask their peers' approach which winds up just being a popularity contest. So who knows. In TX someone died. In Iowa you could be going to the wrong school!


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Clench Million
Charles

Jun 26, 2007, 10:32 PM

Post #460 of 764 (14489 views)
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Re: [Junior Maas] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, personally I think a quality program should have a diverse array of aesthetics, but that is another issue. If someone doesn't share the aesthetics of a school though, will they be accepted in? You would think not.

The ask the peers (or ask the heads of programs) approach happened in the one US News Ranking, but do we know that is what is happening with the Atlantic? Or with the other ranking that is supposed to come out this year? As for that approach, I agree there is a risk of popularity contest, but who is really more qualified to talk about the various strengths of MFA programs if not people who work in them? If we are trying to get a rough measure of qualities like peer strength or faculty, i'm not sure what a better approach would be. But I guess we will see what formulas these new rankings use...


motet
Dana Davis / Moderator
e-mail user

Jun 27, 2007, 12:36 PM

Post #461 of 764 (14429 views)
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A cautionary note... [In reply to] Can't Post

Now that this topic has fired up again, particularly in light of the possibility of new rankings, I want to address a potential problem before it might become an actual one again.

The Speakeasy prides itself on its reputation for spirited conversations that are conducted within the bounds of civil discourse. As the moderator of the forums here, it is my job to see that discussions remain respectful while giving people the opportunity to express themselves and their individual point of view.

Successful moderating isn't an exact science and I've cut off conversations preemptively under some circumstances and let them get a little too far in others. What I hope is that the Speakeasy community will be the primary arbiters of what's useful and what's not, what's respectful discussion and what's a flaming soapbox. But when I need to, I step in.

This topic was one in which we had problems last year, and one in which I had to intervene several times with warnings, deletions and other sanctions. I do not want this to happen again and so I am asking everyone to keep their language, both in words and in "tone", civil and respectful. Please stay on topic and do not (let me repeat) do NOT let the conversation degenerate into name calling, personal or ad hominem attacks or other forms of incivility that so frequently occur on message boards across the net.

Patrons will get one warning--one. If the behavior continues after that, you will lose your posting privileges indefinitely in the MFA Rankings topic.

Let's all make sure that doesn't happen. This topic can be a terrific vehicle for discussing vital aspects of the programs to which you're applying this year. Let's not waste the opportunity.

If you would like to discuss this further, either now or at any point during the school year, please feel free to send me a private message.

Dana


jacarty
Jessie Carty
e-mail user

Jun 27, 2007, 1:11 PM

Post #462 of 764 (14425 views)
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Re: [Clench Million] Re: [In reply to] Can't Post

I like the idea of a ranking being like more of a list. It is arbitrary, often, to just number the top 20 books of the last year etc for what was #1 or what was #20 but having a group of books that are basically should be noted is a good way to "rank".

So I would like to see a different type of ranking. Say--Here is a list of schools that get the most applications -- Here's another list of which schools have longevity --How about a list of schools that are workshopped based vs critical based?

In short, I'd like to see lists, rankings of MFA programs that really serve to show you what the programs have to offer instead of just -- oh hey this school is #1 because it has been around the longest and has the best "reputation" cause as you all probably know, reputation is very subjective.


http://jessiecarty.com


umass76


Jun 27, 2007, 5:13 PM

Post #463 of 764 (14391 views)
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Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post

I think one of the most interesting things I found in researching MFAs for my own application process (now concluded) was that there's a set of schools which seem to show up in any "ranking" you'd care to do, whether it's an unscientific poll of MFA applicants, an assessment of which schools produce graduates who win the "major" awards, or an analysis of which schools have (or "seem" to have, I don't want to overshoot the mark here) the best value-to-cost ratio. Here are the schools I personally encountered in every single "assessment" I did (don't worry, I won't re-initiate the conversation about whether the assessments were scientific, I'll just call it "the assessment I did" and leave it at that):

Brown University
Cornell University
Columbia University
Indiana University
Johns Hopkins University
New York University
Syracuse University
University of Florida
University of Iowa
University of Houston
University of Massachusetts
University of Michigan
University of Texas
University of Virginia
Washington University at St. Louis

Anyway, just thought folks might be interested, as I saw someone say--and I agree--that it's better to think in terms of "lists" (or, if you use several lists, "tiers") rather than saying that X school is "one spot better" (or whatever) than Y school. No one can make those sorts of fine distinctions, I think the best any of us can do is get a general sense of which schools are/have been creating the most positive buzz.

I'm sure any/all of us would be happy to go to just about any of the schools above.

S.


(This post was edited by umass76 on Jun 27, 2007, 7:33 PM)


HopperFu


Jun 27, 2007, 5:52 PM

Post #464 of 764 (14386 views)
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'consensus' list [In reply to] Can't Post

I think that's a great way of looking at it, Seth. That list matches - almost exactly - what I would have done for a 'consensus' kind of list (Seth was looking for poetry, I was looking for fiction).
It's always good to do the further research to figure out what kind of things influence your decisions (i.e., I couldn't afford to move my family to NYC).


Glinda Bamboo


Jun 28, 2007, 9:53 AM

Post #465 of 764 (14307 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] 'consensus' list [In reply to] Can't Post

I also like Seth's general list of programs that tend to appear again and again in different "rankings." I'd also be interested to see some rankings in specific categories. For example, best funding (compared to the city's cost of living), best publication rates (% of graduates who published in major lit mags or snagged book deals), best opportunities for internships/editing experience, etc.

Of course, a lot of that should be covered in an applicant's initial research, and it's not always easy or practical to pin down publication success, but it would still be interesting to see rankings in specific categories.


bennyprof


Jun 30, 2007, 11:00 AM

Post #466 of 764 (14221 views)
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Re: [umass76] Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi,

I’ll be applying to MFA programs this coming winter, and I’ve been browsing these boards for awhile now.

First, I want to thank everyone who posts here for your valuable insights regarding all things MFA. Before about I week ago, I knew next to nothing about the schools I might apply to. I was lost and overwhelmed. But by reading through the threads in this forum (as well as Kealey’s book) I’ve been able to make sense of what I’ll be getting myself into later this year.

Now, rather than being lost and overwhelmed, I’m just overwhelmed. ;)

I’d especially like to thank those who are currently attending MFA programs and have been willing to come back to the board to provide firsthand knowledge about the schools they go to. I think it says a lot about the benevolence of the writing community at large.

Thanks!

Okay, so I’ve whittled my choices down to fifteen schools, separating them into two lists. The first list represents my top choices. Funding is a huge issue for me. So much so that if Iowa accepted me with only partial funding, and one of my 2nd List schools gave full, I’d go with the latter without hesitation.

Maybe I’m speaking as though I’m unique in this respect when, actually, I’m not. I guess what I’m saying is that money is make or break for me. Period. Thus, many of my top ten picks provide full funding for everyone accepted. And, as you can see, about half of them are Hail Mary’s.

My goal is to narrow the list down to 10-12 schools (yep, I’m following Kealey’s app advice.)


1st List
California at Irvine
Massachusetts
Michigan
Cornell
Texas
Virginia
Indiana
JHU
Iowa
Florida

2nd List
Brown
Oregon
Florida St.
Mississippi
Minnesota


Am I overlooking a school that I shouldn’t be? Conversely, is there a school on my list you’d suggest I take out of the running?

Thanks again for your helpful advice.

-B

p.s. I might have posted this in the wrong thread... if so, feel free to move it. I don't want to take things off topic.


(This post was edited by bennyprof on Jun 30, 2007, 11:03 AM)


HopperFu


Jun 30, 2007, 1:39 PM

Post #467 of 764 (14208 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post

I only have two comments about your list:
1) I think Texas at Austin is wildly overrated. The funding is really nice and the get some great visiting faculty, but I think there is a lot to be said about continuity of faculty.
2) Brown is well regarded, but it is almost universally known as an experimental school. Unless that is what you are going for, I'd not bother. Great school if you can get in AND it's the kind of writing you want to do.

I'm of the opinion that funding is also a reflection of how seriously the school takes the writing program and how valued you are there as a student. It's nice if funding is non-competitive (i.e. everybody gets the same funding and funding is known going in).

I don't know a lot about the program, but I've been told that students at Alabama are almost universally happy, and I was pretty impressed by the faculty at Wash U. St. Louis.

If you can afford it, apply to more schools rather than less. It's very, very, very competitive.


bennyprof


Jun 30, 2007, 2:09 PM

Post #468 of 764 (14204 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I only have two comments about your list:
1) I think Texas at Austin is wildly overrated. The funding is really nice and the get some great visiting faculty, but I think there is a lot to be said about continuity of faculty.
2) Brown is well regarded, but it is almost universally known as an experimental school. Unless that is what you are going for, I'd not bother. Great school if you can get in AND it's the kind of writing you want to do.

I'm of the opinion that funding is also a reflection of how seriously the school takes the writing program and how valued you are there as a student. It's nice if funding is non-competitive (i.e. everybody gets the same funding and funding is known going in).

I don't know a lot about the program, but I've been told that students at Alabama are almost universally happy, and I was pretty impressed by the faculty at Wash U. St. Louis.

If you can afford it, apply to more schools rather than less. It's very, very, very competitive.


HopperFu,

Thanks for the advice. I've heard the same thing said about the UT faculty situation, and it's definitely something to consider. It's up there on my list because of its great reputation, funding opportunities, as well as the fact that I've lived in Austin before -- it's a great city -- and still have a lot of friends there.

As for Brown... I know its reputation for experimental writing, which is why it's not in my top ten. At the same time, I've read that its students actually do represent a fairly even mix of styles, bridging the gap between "conventional" and "experimental," and that a certain type of writing isn't pushed upon students who attend, which I think is the major misconception. In other words, experimental writing is just what it's known for. They're still looking for good writers, and they don't pressure you to be wildly unconventional. Also, I'd consider what I'm writing nowadays somewhere in between the two extremes, and a program that challenges me to broaden my perception of fiction might be just what I need. Anyway, I don't know enough about it yet, to be honest, but I might wind up tossing it in favor of another program.

I agree with you on the funding issue. It's why I'm a little hesitant about Iowa... even though I know it's a longshot, I doubt I'll consider it unless they offer me their top tier funding.

I'll check into Alabama and Washington... thanks for the recommendations.

About applying to a lot of programs -- how many would you suggest? How many did you apply for? (I'm assuming you're attending an MFA program right now and have gone through the application process.)


(This post was edited by bennyprof on Jun 30, 2007, 2:12 PM)


HopperFu


Jun 30, 2007, 2:32 PM

Post #469 of 764 (14196 views)
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talk to students / how many to apply to [In reply to] Can't Post

One of the best ways to find out about a school is to talk to currently enrolled students or recent grads. They'll give you the skinny. If you aren't sure about Brown (or any other school) try to get in touch with students.

As for how many to apply to, I'm not a great case study. I only applied to four school (and yes, I'm currently attending) but had a number of other factors.
The real question is not how many schools you should apply to, but rather do you want to go to "An" MFA program, or "Specific" MFA programs. If you are only willing to go to four schools, only apply to those four. If you just want to go to an MFA program, apply to as many as you can afford and can convince your letter writers to send to: at least eight, but one of my friends applied to sixteen (she got into eight). There are lots of trade-offs.
The problem is that because the process is subjective you'll hear about people who applied to eight schools and only got in to one, yet that one school is the one that is considered most competitive. Or people who apply three years in a row, get in nowhere, and in their fourth year get a fellowship at Iowa. It's important to figure out as early in the process as possible what you really want.


umass76


Jun 30, 2007, 4:09 PM

Post #470 of 764 (14180 views)
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Re: Benny [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi Benny,

Having gone through this experience myself last fall, I think the number of schools you should apply to depends on the range of schools you're applying to; if you've tiered your choices such that you have only as many reaches as other types of schools (i.e., schools you feel you've a good chance with, and schools where the odds of acceptance seem very much in your favor) then 10 to 12 schools might be fine. If you're planning on applying only to the top schools, and that's pretty much what it seems you're doing (no judgment intended there), and if funding is important to you, I think you won't be "safe" unless you apply to 15 to 20 schools. Yes, I know, that's a huge financial investment, and I know I'm militating for slightly more schools than Kealey advises, but I'm speaking from my own experience here. Last fall I applied to Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Cornell, Brown, Virginia, and Johns Hopkins, and while I was lucky enough to get into the first three, I got immediate form rejections from the other four, and others I knew who got into those other schools nevertheless got form rejections from Iowa, Michigan, and Massachusetts (for instance, one person I know got into Cornell, the toughest MFA to get into in America statistically speaking, and got form rejections from Iowa, Michigan, Massachusetts, Brown, Virginia, and JHU). What I think that tells you is that highly-ranked, well-funded programs are longshots for everyone. Had things rolled the wrong way I'm sure the three schools I got into might have responded to my application exactly as the other four did; it wasn't like, "Well, if I'm a good candidate for Iowa, it means I'll at least be waitlisted at ______." Not necessarily. So, looking at your list, I'd recommend 15 or more schools.

If you go to my website (http://sethabramson.blogspot.com/...ng-mfa-rankings.html), you'll find acceptance rates for many of the schools on your list. Consider: looking at individual genres only (poetry or fiction), Irvine (6), Cornell (4), Virginia (5), Brown (5), Johns Hopkins (5), and Texas (5) will this year take a total of 30 students per genre. That's 6 of the 15 schools on your list, or 40%; which means, conceptually at least, that unless you're very confident you're among the top thirty candidates in your genre in the United States, you may well find yourself getting a quick reject (I'm speaking in theoretical terms here; obviously I hope you get in everywhere!) from almost half your schools right off the bat. Of the schools below, only Iowa (25 per genre), Michigan (12), Massachusetts (10), are "large" programs, and of course it's all relative, even 25 is a very small class compared to the "major" graduate school institutions (law, medicine, business, engineering). The rest of your prospective schools (Indiana; Florida; Oregon; Florida State; Mississippi; and Minnesota) all accept about seven students per genre, although actually I think Mississippi may be four. Which means, taking all the schools you're applying to and averaging them, and taking out Iowa because it's a little off the curve here numbers-wise, the schools you're applying to accept an average of 6 or 7 students per genre. With the average applicant pool for the top forty schools hovering around 400 or so (approximately 250 fiction and 150 poetry; invariably, more apply to the former than the latter), you're looking at something like an average 2.6% acceptance rate for the schools you like if you're in fiction, and 4.3% if you're in poetry. Very rough numbers? Of course. But they give you a taste, I think, of how things stand.

The reason I went through all that analysis, and have all the numbers I do on my site, is to encourage people to understand that applying to an MFA isn't like applying to, say, law school. Consider: as an attorney, I applied to law school in 1998 with a very good but not astronomical GPA and an extremely high LSAT score (making me, I think, somewhat comparable as a law school applicant to how I was as an MFA applicant, if perhaps a little bit stronger as the former than the latter). I applied to twelve of the top fifteen law schools in the country and only didn't get into two: one (Yale) was and is the top law school in the country, and the other (Cornell) wasn't really a rejection, as I took myself out of the running by deciding not to go to Ithaca for an in-person interview (a requirement if you pass the first rounds of the application process; however, by the time you hear from them, you've often gotten in outright to other schools you prefer, as happened with me). Yet those results were "predictable" based on my GPA, LSAT, and alma mater. With MFA applications there's absolutely no comparison conceptually--the process is wholly different, as are the weighing of various candidate factors--yet many still apply to MFAs the same way they'd apply to law schools, i.e. by applying only to the best ones and hoping something good happens.

Top twenty-five law schools also have, on average, acceptance rates five to ten times higher than the top twenty-five MFA programs.

So, Benny, your list looks great, and I frankly don't think you should drop any of those schools (albeit, if you're in poetry, I would consider dropping Johns Hopkins, Texas, and Oregon; JHU and Texas because of only modest faculty reputation in the field, and because those schools generally predicate their reputations on their fiction programs; Oregon because I've heard some horror stories from people about the behavior of their admittedly well-regarded poetry faculty), but I do think you should add some schools, perhaps five, all with higher acceptance rates and/or larger in size than your current crop of options. So, I'd take a look at:

Bowling Green State **
Montana ***
Syracuse *
Washington University (@ St. Louis) *
Notre Dame **
U. of Washington ***
Purdue **
Arizona ***
New Mexico **
Wisconsin **
Penn State **

* Excellent reputation and funding.

** Good reputation and excellent funding (albeit I'd put New Mexico slightly behind the others).

*** Very good reputation and a large school, [relatively-speaking] many applicants accepted.

Hope this helps, Benny.

Be well,
Seth



(This post was edited by umass76 on Jun 30, 2007, 4:14 PM)


GDClark
George David Clark
e-mail user

Jun 30, 2007, 4:18 PM

Post #471 of 764 (14174 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post

B,

I'll echo Hopperfu's suggestion that you look into the Alabama program. I hear only good things about those guys.

A school you might want to consider dropping-for purely financial reasons-is U Mass. Word has it that program is really suffering financially right now and for the next couple years the scholarship dollar is going to be even harder to come by.

Hope that helps.

As others have said, the best bet in narrowing down these options might be to correspond with current students. If you have any questions about Virginia feel free to pm me.

And if I'm wrong about U Mass somebody please correct me-everything I've heard is second hand.

GDC


umass76


Jun 30, 2007, 5:22 PM

Post #472 of 764 (14164 views)
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Re: [GDClark] Oops...my message doesn't seem to be showing up...? [In reply to] Can't Post

GD,

I think the financial aid package at Massachusetts is still very competitive, even if it's not in the top tier (cf. top 15 or so) of packages. On average 1 out of every 10 students, it seems, gets the Graduate School Fellowship ($14,000+ w/o teaching), and half or more of the rest (as I understand it) can get TAships (I believe $11,000+), which also come with a (I believe full) tuition waiver. That really puts Massachusetts in the above-average category, funding-wise. Schools with "bad" funding either have no TAships, TAships for less than a quarter of students, and/or TAships which don't carry with them a full or even substantial tuition waiver. At least that's the information I have right now, and/or can recall.

S.


bennyprof


Jun 30, 2007, 5:57 PM

Post #473 of 764 (14155 views)
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Re: [umass76] Benny [In reply to] Can't Post

Umass,

Thank you so much for the advice! That's exactly what I was looking for.

And I can see your point when it comes to applying to as many schools as possible. I actually meant to put Penn State on my list, as I've read a lot of good things about it. I’m vaguely familiar with most of the other schools as well, and I’ll look into them more in the coming weeks and months.

Oh, and I'm going for fiction... probably should've mentioned that.

I know the odds of getting into the top schools seem bleak from a statistical standpoint, but I think the numbers can be misleading. As someone else pointed out previously, everyone thinks they can write, and most of them can't. While I'd be kidding myself to assume I'm among the top 30 candidates in the country, I'm fairly confident my submissions would at least make it past the first round and out of the slush pile, which in all likelihood includes at least half of the total submissions... even (perhaps especially) at schools like Iowa and Johns Hopkins. That alone would double my odds! (Okay, okay… my unwavering optimism -- read: naivety -- is getting the better of me.)

I agree (and thank you for pointing out) that my wish-list is unbalanced. I understand it’s a subjective, unpredictable selection process, and in light of this I need to throw in at least four or five more realistic schools into my list of prospects, so when April rolls around I’m not stuck with a fistful of rejection letters and zero offers.

Thanks again.
-B


(This post was edited by bennyprof on Jun 30, 2007, 5:59 PM)


Clench Million
Charles

Jun 30, 2007, 6:02 PM

Post #474 of 764 (14153 views)
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Re: [umass76] Benny [In reply to] Can't Post

I think Umass brings up some good points regarding acceptance rates. Applying to a few more large programs might be a smart idea.

The one thing I would say, to make the picture look a little less grim, is that most schools go through far more acceptances than just the 6 or 7 spots. Many people get into multiple programs and they can only go to one. A friend who went through UVAs program told me one year they went through over 20 people on the wait-list for fiction alone. So the odds of getting an acceptance are actually a fair bit higher than 2.6%. This seems like a trend that will continue to rise as people apply to more and more programs.


bennyprof


Jun 30, 2007, 6:05 PM

Post #475 of 764 (14151 views)
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Re: [umass76] Benny [In reply to] Can't Post

Umass,

Just clicked on your site... didn't know that was you! I came across your blog a while back while doing my research and have read it several times through since. (It's in my favorites. ;))

Thanks for putting together such a valuable resource for prospective students!

-B

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