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bennyprof


Sep 14, 2007, 8:11 PM

Post #176 of 357 (5866 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Maybe I'm confusing "admittance" and "acceptance." Or, thinking the two are synonymous when they're not. Maybe you can be accepted into the program, then admitted after graduation. Dunno how that works.


rpc
ryan call

Sep 14, 2007, 8:58 PM

Post #177 of 357 (5861 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

thats maybe something youll want to ask the program about

but the way i see it is this: when you send in your app, that will come with transcripts from all "degree granting institutions," and they're going to see everything, which is the most important thing probably. if they see you're on track to graduate a second time with a 4.0, that should be fine.

i doubt the other thing will negatively affect your application, but that's just me. send them all the transcripts and get that manuscript the best it can be

it cant hurt to try


<HTMLGIANT>


hamlet3145


Sep 15, 2007, 11:12 AM

Post #178 of 357 (5843 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Two things:

--I really doubt that they (the creative writing department) would even glance at your GPA until they read your writing sample and decided to admit you.

--Whenever I put down an undergrade GPA for any of my applications I always just averaged all my undergrad grades together (I have two bachelors). If you averaged your grades from your 1st bachelors with the work you've done on your second, then it would sound likely to me that you'd have over a 3.0 anyway, wouldn't you?

--Okay, three things. =) A 2.8 won't profoundly affect your admissions prospects. There are 10 others things more likely to sink you first.


bennyprof


Sep 15, 2007, 12:08 PM

Post #179 of 357 (5838 views)
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Re: [Hamlet3145] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
--I really doubt that they (the creative writing department) would even glance at your GPA until they read your writing sample and decided to admit you.



Yeah, I realize that. My concern was about the grad school's policies. Whether the 3.0 GPA thing is a hard and fast rule, or if there's a little wiggle room there.



Quote

--Whenever I put down an undergrade GPA for any of my applications I always just averaged all my undergrad grades together (I have two bachelors). If you averaged your grades from your 1st bachelors with the work you've done on your second, then it would sound likely to me that you'd have over a 3.0 anyway, wouldn't you?



That's an idea. I'll ask around about that. Thanks.


Quote
--Okay, three things. =) A 2.8 won't profoundly affect your admissions prospects. There are 10 others things more likely to sink you first.



Understood. More of an inquiery on whether the GPA would sink me before the process even began. Preemptive sinkage. A hole in the hull before I even leave port, so to speak. Sorry, end of metaphor.







bennyprof


Sep 16, 2007, 7:04 PM

Post #180 of 357 (5808 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

GRE = OVER.

Took it today. Got a 1300 (630 Verbal, 670 Quantitative), which was much higher than I'd anticipated. I know a 630 verbal isn't exactly a jaw-dropping score, but it's not horrific either. Past the "Oh crap, maybe I should retake it" line anyway.

I feel pretty confident about the writing portion as well. Will find out in 10-15 days.

SO glad to get that over with so I can throw all my energy into the writing sample. To anyone debating whether to take it now or later: unless you're completely unprepared I'd highly recommend the former. Feels good to be done.

-B


(This post was edited by bennyprof on Sep 17, 2007, 1:37 AM)


HopperFu


Sep 17, 2007, 10:29 AM

Post #181 of 357 (5760 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

congrats on being done. I don't have a crystal ball, but those scores seem like they should be absolutely fine.


Raignn



Sep 17, 2007, 5:12 PM

Post #182 of 357 (5716 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Question. What's the lowest Quantitative score people would (or did) feel comfortable with? There is tons of talk about Verbal (aim for mid to high 600's), and I know the MFA has nothing to do with math at all, but how low is too low?

I'm taking the GRE on Friday and I've definitely done some math studying, but I just wonder what I can be happy with (so that I don't look like a complete boob).


HopperFu


Sep 17, 2007, 6:27 PM

Post #183 of 357 (5707 views)
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Re: [Raignn] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Wow, no idea. Honestly, it's whatever the lowest score is that the Graduate School (which is separate from the MFA programs) will allow. The only math you're required to do in an MFA program is to split the bill if you go out for drinks...
Total wild guess? 60 percentile?


jaywalke


Sep 17, 2007, 11:04 PM

Post #184 of 357 (5690 views)
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Re: [Raignn] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Question. What's the lowest Quantitative score people would (or did) feel comfortable with?


I don't think it matters in the slightest. Creative types like to boast about how terrible they are at math, so perhaps a lower score might even help convince folks you are dominated by your right-brain. The math on the GRE is at about a 7th or 8th grade level, but it is disguised with a lot of smoke and mirrors. If you take your time and reduce it to its simplest form, it's all very easy stuff. I work for a world-class mathematician (rock-star research faculty at a big state school), and he laughed when he saw my Qual score. I matched the score of the best math Ph.D. applicant they accepted this year. It mattered not a whit, of course, when my writing sample failed to impress the MFA faculty at the same school.

It's all about the sample. It's all about the sample. Finally, it's all about the sample.


HopperFu


Sep 18, 2007, 8:02 AM

Post #185 of 357 (5664 views)
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Re: [jaywalke] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
It's all about the sample. It's all about the sample. Finally, it's all about the sample.

I've been preaching that as well, however, you do have to get past the graduate school (which is very different than getting accepted into the MFA program). You don't need a particularly good score, but it can't be 200. I'd imagine that anybody who spends an half an hour looking through a test prep book would score well enough.
Regardless, though, it's probably not worth retaking the GRE to improve your math score.


jaywalke


Sep 18, 2007, 8:29 AM

Post #186 of 357 (5660 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
you do have to get past the graduate school (which is very different than getting accepted into the MFA program


Of course, but if schools have set a minimum math score for MFA applicants they are keeping it secret.

This is what Cornell says:
"Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) GRE requirements vary by field. <snip> Scores alone do not determine admissibility; the university and the graduate fields make decisions based on a variety of criteria."

If there is a basement number, I would still put my money on it being cumulative for verbal and math. They know writers don't count so goodly. If we could count, we would have long ago realized the odds against success in the arts.

I agree that a few minutes with a review book should give anyone enough right answers to scrape by.

BTW, Dividing up drinks is easy if everyone simply buys a round . . .

:-]


HopperFu


Sep 18, 2007, 9:10 AM

Post #187 of 357 (5650 views)
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Re: [jaywalke] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

BTW, Dividing up drinks is easy if everyone simply buys a round . . .


It's even easier if you have a generous prof out with you....
Actually, we have a new MFA here who majored in astrophysics, so I'm going to make her deal with it from now on.


Aubrie


Sep 18, 2007, 9:59 AM

Post #188 of 357 (5642 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I took my Barron's prep book & The Ultimate Math Refresher (a really, really great book - I highly recommend) to the library about 3 hours before the exam. I forced myself to work through problem after problem so everything was fresh in my head for the exam. It worked.

If I had taken the exam 3 days later? Probably would have scored pretty miserably.

I don't retain math well, so having it at the front of my brain, so to speak, was very effective for me.

Definitely check out the Ultimate Math Refresher (it's on Amazon), and don't stress too much. I've met people in great MFAs who had low math scores - and I mean low. Just make sure the rest of your application is as good as you can possibly make it!


alishein


Sep 18, 2007, 12:45 PM

Post #189 of 357 (5623 views)
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Re: [Aubrie] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

To follow up with what everyone has said -- I spent a lot of time studying for the Math section of the GRE. I did surprisingly well but, in retrospect, I would have been better off spending all that time completing the applications ( because I definitely had to overnight a few). I even think a 60% may be a lot higher than you even need. Apparently, for the bulk of the people taking the GRE - the math is the easy part, so the percentages reflect that. For example, when I took the test last year - a 690 in math was the 68th percentile. Whereas, a score in the low 700's for verbal was something like 97%.

I'm also going to add that I scored a 4 (32nd percentile!) on the writing section ( I absolutely cannot write on command like that). And, I admit, I was put on 5 waitlists (no bites -- I'll be reapplying this year) I'm going to bet that that had everything to do with a subpar writing sample and not the GRE.

In closing, no matter how you do on the GRE - you're certain to score higher on the writing sample than I did.


Yugao


Sep 18, 2007, 8:23 PM

Post #190 of 357 (5587 views)
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Re: [Raignn] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

My quantitative score was relatively low, in the upper 500s, but my verbal score was in the 700s, so I decided to just leave it. I did do better on all the practice tests, and was expecting to make a score in the low to mid 600s, but I can easily flub math when I am nervous. I decided I'd rather put the time into improving my writing sample rather than improving my GRE score. I won't be retaking the test. From what I understand, no one on the committtee will look at my GRE scores unless my writing sample is stellar. I'm guessing my combined score is high enough for admission cut-offs, though I'm obviously no mathematical genius.


bighark


Sep 18, 2007, 10:02 PM

Post #191 of 357 (5574 views)
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Re: [Yugao] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I've always looked at it this way: If your writing is strong enough, the program will work with the graduate school to find a way around the GRE The grad school, in contrast, will never work with the program to find away around a weak writing sample no matter how good the GRE ends up being.


Scrat1


Sep 20, 2007, 9:44 PM

Post #192 of 357 (5517 views)
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Re: [bighark] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

When do you put in the school codes for the GRE? At the test site or when you register and pay online? I'm asking because I need to sign up for the GRE soon, but I'm not entirely sure which schools I'm applying for. I mean I have a few core schools I want, but I haven't made my complete list.


bighark


Sep 20, 2007, 10:03 PM

Post #193 of 357 (5513 views)
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Re: [Scrat1] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Don't worry--you'll only need four schools on test day.

You get four "free" score reports with your exam on the day you take it. After that, you'll have to pay $15 for each additional report, which you can order at your leisure once you've settled on your list.


Raignn



Sep 21, 2007, 12:34 PM

Post #194 of 357 (5464 views)
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Re: [Raignn] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Just got done with my test. 660 on Quantitative (HA!) and 600 Verbal. Seems pretty middle of the road to me and I can back up my academic prowess with a very strong transcript (Graduated from Purdue with a 3.8). So my first time will be my last time. Yay!

So now, on to the important stuff!!


bennyprof


Sep 21, 2007, 1:44 PM

Post #195 of 357 (5457 views)
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Re: [Raignn] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Haha, congrats on the math score! I was surprised at how high mine turned out, too. From everything I've read, anywhere around 600 on verbal is a comfortable spot to be in. I think it's the 550 or lower scores that will start to give grad school admission boards pause. Even then, if your writing is stellar the MFA program will step in and pull some strings. Welcome to the "done-with-the-GRE-and-never-have-to-take-it-again" club. Coffee and donuts in the back.


bennyprof


Oct 3, 2007, 1:29 PM

Post #196 of 357 (5367 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, received my writing score today. 4.5 -- Not good, not bad. Was hoping to get at least a 5, but oh well. I inserted a bit of humor into one of my answers (couldn't resist), and that might not have come off very well. Apparently ETS takes their test quite seriously, as though the GRE is an actual indicator of some kind? Hehe. Anyway, it's over.


alishein


Oct 3, 2007, 3:53 PM

Post #197 of 357 (5349 views)
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Re: [bennyprof] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'll be reapplying to some schools this year (and applying for some others for the first time) -- does anyone happen to know if schools in general keep a file on previous applicants? As in, if I reapply to some places from last year -- will they still have my transcripts and GRE scores maybe? So I don't have to pay ETS to send them again? I'm assuming that they don't generally retain records like that (that would be a lot of paper) but I was wondering if anyone knew anything generally - before I get into contacting schools to check.


bighark


Oct 3, 2007, 5:06 PM

Post #198 of 357 (5338 views)
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Re: [alishein] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Yes, some schools to do maintain files. Some won't even make you pay the application fee more than once. For example, I only had to pay for one of my four Notre Dame rejections :)

Anyway, you should call the schools to figure out what, if anything, they keep.

Good luck.


Rambler


Oct 8, 2007, 12:50 PM

Post #199 of 357 (5280 views)
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GRE study books? [In reply to] Can't Post

What books helped you get ready for the GRE? I went to Barnes and Noble the other day and was overwhelmed with the selection. I know that some people have mentioned various websites and such, but is there a book in particular that helped you overall to prepare? (esp. with math)

Also, how long do you suggest studying? I am thinking about registering for the end of Oct. Is that not enough time? (I know this is a subjective question. But I generally do well on standardized tests...not a brilliant, but decent showing.)

Thanks!


alishein


Oct 8, 2007, 5:40 PM

Post #200 of 357 (5255 views)
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Re: [Rambler] GRE study books? [In reply to] Can't Post

Last year I used the Princeton Review's GRE prep book. Specifically, the one that comes with a CD. I thought the version with the CD was worth the splurge (it costs a little more than the version without) because it allows you to take tests on the computer -- so you can simulate the test environment. Which you can't do as well with the book and the paper based tests that are included in it.

Rambler, I can't tell you how much to study -- but that book also had study plan options - where the writers had laid out 4 different study plans based on how long you had before taking the test. I thought that was helpful because it really narrowed down all the material -- rather than having to cram the whole book into two weeks or whatever.

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