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laughingman


Dec 23, 2006, 1:40 PM

Post #126 of 357 (6131 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] institution/ dept codes? [In reply to] Can't Post

Agreed. It would definately be a better move to send one of Flannery O'Connor's lesser-known stories as your writing sample.


jargreen

e-mail user

Dec 23, 2006, 9:37 PM

Post #127 of 357 (6101 views)
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Oh boy! Here we go again ... [In reply to] Can't Post

I see that Florida requests scores be sent to department code 2501, which I'm guessing is the English department in general. Here's a real stinker: Illinois wants scores sent electronically to department code 0000. 0000! Electronically!

I already had my scores sent there by mail. But that's not good enough.

I've searched this forum, and maybe overlooked it, but has anyone figured out how to have the scores sent electronically? The GRE website doesn't say one word about this. I wonder if this can be done via the automated line, or would one have the speak to a real person? Wonder too how long it takes to send them that way.

Suddenly frantic,
Ryan


v1ctorya


Dec 24, 2006, 1:55 PM

Post #128 of 357 (6067 views)
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Re: [jargreen] Oh boy! Here we go again ... [In reply to] Can't Post

Jar,

As far as I know the GRE DOES send them electronically anyway. Once you pay. Some schools have it set up to receive scores every two weeks, some once a month. That's why it peeves me that it costs 15$ a score report, they just attach it to an e-mail anyway.


jargreen

e-mail user

Dec 24, 2006, 3:45 PM

Post #129 of 357 (6055 views)
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Re: [v1ctorya] Oh boy! Here we go again ... [In reply to] Can't Post

Weird. Thanks!


ecphraticknolls


Dec 27, 2006, 2:00 PM

Post #130 of 357 (5997 views)
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Re: [Mikaeltb] GREs and GPAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Okay, well, I think I’ve run into a predicament. I took the GRE this past March thinking that I would apply to a certain MA program in philosophy at the last minute. I ended up taking the year off, and now I’m applying to MFA programs. Well, I was supposed to take the GRE this morning, but I somehow confused the test times

they wouldn’t let me take the test since I was an hour late >.<

First time around I got a 550 verbal / 660 math / 5.5 writing

I know I can do better on the verbal section (above 600 easy, 700 on a great day with the right words… I also think I would pull a 6 on the writing, since I messed up in my approach to the argument analysis portion last time). Should I bother to drop ANOTHER $130 on the damned test? Or… should I just apply with what I have?

I don’t have an English background… I focused on History and Philosophy as an undergrad.


hamholio


Dec 27, 2006, 2:22 PM

Post #131 of 357 (5992 views)
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Re: [ecphraticknolls] GREs and GPAs [In reply to] Can't Post

You're applying right now or next year? If you're applying next year, I wouldn't worry about it. If you're applying right now, I'm not sure you'd be able to get your new scores in on time anyway.

On the other hand, if you feel the need to have the "magic feather" of a higher GRE score -- then spend that extra cash. Probably won't do you one lick of good outside of your own confidence.


(This post was edited by hamholio on Dec 27, 2006, 2:23 PM)


ecphraticknolls


Dec 27, 2006, 2:38 PM

Post #132 of 357 (5983 views)
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Re: [hamholio] GREs and GPAs [In reply to] Can't Post

I’m applying for this year… I already sent my old scores to some schools… but I’m worried that such a low verbal score will hurt my chances…


jargreen

e-mail user

Dec 27, 2006, 2:39 PM

Post #133 of 357 (5983 views)
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Re: [ecphraticknolls] GREs and GPAs [In reply to] Can't Post

ecphraticknolls,

Based upon everything I've gathered from this website and from countless professors and grad schools, the GRE does not weigh heavily on an MFA faculty member's evaluation of your application. The writing sample is what's important to him/her. However, strangely, the English Graduate Programs who "okay" each writing program's choices might take a second look at your verbal score. Also, if you're applying to a program where you're competing for funding, it's possible that your scores might not get top dollar.

The only schools that actually post any information on the matter (for example, Ohio State) talk about 600 being the desirable score.

If you want my advice, polish up your writing sample and have those scores sent to the schools you're interested in. But if you're willing to wait another year, take the test again and apply next year with your shiny new scores.

Sorry to hear about the mixup. Hope this helps.

Anybody else have other ideas?


GDClark
George David Clark
e-mail user

Dec 28, 2006, 2:38 PM

Post #134 of 357 (5899 views)
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Re: [jargreen] GREs and GPAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Go ahead and send in the scores you've got now. If you've got the $130 you might take the test next month and forward the new scores along then. At least you'll have them in your back pocket. If you get an acceptance without funding you might ask if the improved GRE could bump you up the list.


Glinda Bamboo


Jan 17, 2007, 9:11 AM

Post #135 of 357 (5798 views)
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Re: Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Hey everyone, guess what I got in the mail yesterday? ETS finally sent my GRE preparation materials.

I took the GRE in October.

Thanks, ETS. Thanks a lot.


HopperFu


Jan 17, 2007, 9:15 AM

Post #136 of 357 (5796 views)
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Re: [Glinda Bamboo] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

God, Glinda, I wanted to respond to that, but the best my brain could come up with was, gaaaaa! And then the sound of my head thumping on the desk.

ETS sucks.


ecphraticknolls


Jan 17, 2007, 9:32 AM

Post #137 of 357 (5792 views)
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Re: [Glinda Bamboo] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Eh? Well, most of that stuff is available online anyway. Not that it is particularly helpful (aside from power prep). Most of the independent prep guides are better anyway (Barron’s, Kaplan, and maybe Princeton Review if one happens to be in a rush).

Though I’m not sure how much good this is going to do you at this point. I’m sure it won’t matter that much. It is a fine arts degree.

However, ETS still sucks.


Glinda Bamboo


Jan 17, 2007, 10:20 AM

Post #138 of 357 (5777 views)
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Re: [ecphraticknolls] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, I certainly didn't wait around for the ETS stuff last fall. I used a third party study guide and had my SO tutor me on the math.

I did call my local test center about the ETS materials once, and the girl said: "Um, I don't think they really mail anything out. Even if they say they do."

So, yeah. Go ETS.


alishein


Jan 17, 2007, 10:56 AM

Post #139 of 357 (5759 views)
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Re: [Glinda Bamboo] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

the same thing happened to me! I took the GRE in November (but signed up for them in October) and last week the prep CD came in the mail!


jargreen

e-mail user

Jan 17, 2007, 6:25 PM

Post #140 of 357 (5698 views)
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Re: [alishein] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Ditto! (At least they cared enough to send it.)


MissEsquire



Jun 21, 2007, 9:31 PM

Post #141 of 357 (5567 views)
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Re: [jargreen] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Has anyone taken the English Literature subject test? I have to take this to apply to Cornell's joint M.F.A./PhD program. Johns Hopkins also suggests taking this. How much did you study (by study I mean read) and how did you do? I'm an English major and have read maybe 1/2 to 3/4 of the work on the reading list....but have never read the Bible cover-to-cover or (embarrassingly) Paradise Lost.


(This post was edited by MissEsquire on Jun 21, 2007, 9:33 PM)


alishein


Jun 25, 2007, 12:35 PM

Post #142 of 357 (5501 views)
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Re: [MissEsquire] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm planning on taking the GRE lit as well. I was thinking of getting the Kaplan (or whichever brand) study guide and starting there. I used a study guide for the General Test and it worked really well for me.


mattk


Jun 25, 2007, 12:37 PM

Post #143 of 357 (5501 views)
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Re: [MissEsquire] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I took the Lit subject test a couple years ago in preparation for one application and did very poorly. I studied quite a bit, but only about 3 weeks before the exam. I think I scored in the bottom 40%. A big factor me is that I took it about six years after my BA, so a lot of stuff I'd read was now lost at the level of detail where it would be useful in taking this test. Cramming over 3 weeks probably wasn't a good idea either - I read a lot, but I'm not sure how much of it was useful - you (at least I) can only learn so much.

I was going to retake it last year in preparation for applying to phd programs, and started studying 8 weeks out and was feeling much better about my progress and schedule, but decided NOT to retake it because I felt like the time I was investing in studying was only going to marginally improve my score and that ultimately the investment wasn't worth it, esp when there are lots of schools that don't ask for it. I ended up getting into my top choice phd program, albeit one that didn't ask for Lit GRE. Of the two schools I've applied to that asked for it, I was waitlisted at one and didn't get into the other. I can't imagine that any school *really* cares that much how you do on this, esp in creative writing, but maybe it's the case.

I would not focus at all on the Bible (at least not for the GRE) - it's not worth reading it to answer one or two questions. Paradise Lost might be worth reading, but I wouldn't read the whole thing - just enough to be able to recognize it. There are lots of study guides out there that will help you figure out what's worth reading and knowing well vs what you can safely skip. But, my advice might not be the best, since I did so poorly on the test. ;)


bighark


Jun 25, 2007, 2:00 PM

Post #144 of 357 (5488 views)
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Re: [mattk] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

There are ZERO creative writing MFA programs that require the Lit GRE.

The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins does not require the Lit GRE. Write the program and ask. Yes, the website says something about it being strongly recommended. Yes, that's confusing. Write the program and get clarification. Remember, this is an MFA program---an exceptionally strong writing portfolio is the primary point of consideration. Instead of wasting time and money trying to prepare for an unnecessary exam, work on your portfolio and a kick-ass statement of purpose (which at Johns Hopkins is quite a challenge).

The Cornell MFA does not require the Lit GRE. Only the Cornell joint PhD/MFA requires the Lit GRE and that's because it's a frickin' PhD in English Literature that lets you take MFA classes. Note that I didn't write "PhD in Creative Writing." You'll take two years of MFA coursework and the rest will be PhD studies. One student a year is accepted into that program. In my opinion, that's one crazy student (no doubt a poet). If you don't feel comfortable taking the Lit GRE this afternoon, I would suggest skipping the joint PhD/MFA and going straight for the MFA. PhD programs won't be going anywhere any time soon, and if you're good enough to get a Cornell MFA, you'll have no trouble getting into a fine English PhD program later down the road.

Good luck


(This post was edited by bighark on Jun 25, 2007, 2:02 PM)


blueragtop


Jun 25, 2007, 2:54 PM

Post #145 of 357 (5477 views)
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Re: [bighark] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Don't waste money studying for the GRE. Any program worth their salt, basis admission on the writing. I was skeptical when applying, but everyone here was right. The GRE is just a formality.


hamholio


Jun 25, 2007, 6:58 PM

Post #146 of 357 (5453 views)
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Re: [melos] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Yeah, but if your score is poor enough, you might get accepted by the program but have trouble getting accepted by the Grad School.


HopperFu


Jun 26, 2007, 10:15 AM

Post #147 of 357 (5411 views)
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study (a little) [In reply to] Can't Post

For MFA programs it is mostly a formality, but yeah, you need a certain score to get in past most of the grad programs. I wouldn't stress about it though.
My suggestion would be to study a little bit for the GRE. You can actually improve your grade quite a bit through studying - not because you can learn the info, but because there are some good test strategies. I wouldn't put a ton of work into it, but if you can pick up one of the books (Kaplan, Princeton, whatever) a month or so ahead and go through it, that might help.

Oh, and as for the MFA / Ph.D. hybrid at Cornell, they actually will admit as many qualified candidates as apply, but you have to get admitted into both programs which is hard. Some years nobody gets in, some years there are more than one. But Bighark is right, if you can get in to the MFA program you can likely get into a Ph.D. program later if you really want. There are two students currently in the MFA program who are planning to get their Ph.D.s, and I can't imagine that they'll have trouble getting in. They're smart cookies.


hamholio


Jun 26, 2007, 12:54 PM

Post #148 of 357 (5386 views)
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Re: [HopperFu] study (a little) [In reply to] Can't Post

and definitely do the two computerized practice tests GRE offers to get a sense of how you'll score and what the format is.


MissEsquire



Jun 27, 2007, 12:00 PM

Post #149 of 357 (5337 views)
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Re: [bighark] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks for your advice. I see what you're saying about getting into PhD programs after the MFA. I've always had a desire both to earn an MFA (fiction) and to earn my PhD in English Literature (am applying to several Lit programs as well), which is what I'm studying now. That's why Cornell's joint program appealed to me. But who knows. Maybe after two years of masters work at any one school a person would be itching for a change.

In terms of the Lit GRE, though, would you say it's better to write it while you're still studying the literature on the test? This was my line of thinking. Even if I wait a few years to apply to a PhD program, at least I wouldn't have to reread a truckload of books.


In Reply To
There are ZERO creative writing MFA programs that require the Lit GRE.

The Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins does not require the Lit GRE. Write the program and ask. Yes, the website says something about it being strongly recommended. Yes, that's confusing. Write the program and get clarification. Remember, this is an MFA program---an exceptionally strong writing portfolio is the primary point of consideration. Instead of wasting time and money trying to prepare for an unnecessary exam, work on your portfolio and a kick-ass statement of purpose (which at Johns Hopkins is quite a challenge).

The Cornell MFA does not require the Lit GRE. Only the Cornell joint PhD/MFA requires the Lit GRE and that's because it's a frickin' PhD in English Literature that lets you take MFA classes. Note that I didn't write "PhD in Creative Writing." You'll take two years of MFA coursework and the rest will be PhD studies. One student a year is accepted into that program. In my opinion, that's one crazy student (no doubt a poet). If you don't feel comfortable taking the Lit GRE this afternoon, I would suggest skipping the joint PhD/MFA and going straight for the MFA. PhD programs won't be going anywhere any time soon, and if you're good enough to get a Cornell MFA, you'll have no trouble getting into a fine English PhD program later down the road.

Good luck



(This post was edited by MissEsquire on Jun 27, 2007, 12:06 PM)


bighark


Jun 27, 2007, 12:10 PM

Post #150 of 357 (5329 views)
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Re: [MissEsquire] Well, that was helpful. [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't really know the particulars about the Cornell program, but I surmise that you get your MFA after the first two years the way that you'd get an MA from other PhD programs in other subjects at the two year mark (not all PhD programs do that, of course, but many do).

Since you'd be taking the same courses with the same instructors in the same cohort of students, there's absolutely nothing that would devalue your degree. You'd be considered a real M.F.A student because that's what you'd be--an MFA student (who happens to be working toward a PhD in English at the same time).

Good luck.

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