»

Subscribe | Give a Gift Subscription

Log In or Register | Help | Contact Us | Donate

Advanced Search

Main Index » Writing and Publishing » MFA Programs
Preparing for an MFA
Edit your profilePrivate messages Search postsWho's online?
You are not signed in. Click here to sign in.
If you are not a member, Register here!
135738 registered users
First page Previous page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next page Last page  View All


katiej


Apr 14, 2008, 11:34 AM

Post #176 of 213 (3742 views)
Shortcut
Re: [aiyamei] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post

Aiyamei:

you are amazing. Thank you for your consistently eloquent and lucid voice. I wish you all the best success with your writing.

grand-scheme independence: yes, yes, yes, yes.


LaurenS


Apr 14, 2008, 11:52 AM

Post #177 of 213 (3732 views)
Shortcut
Need to be published to get an MFA [In reply to] Can't Post

I have mixed feelings. I definitely support writers of all stripes continuing to hone craft and work with mentors. On the other hand, it's hard being young, passionate, inexperienced, and forced to compete against writers far more seasoned than yourself.

Having typed that, of course, it occurs to me that such competition is what real life is about. :)

There are lots of ways to improve one's writing without committing to an MFA: workshops, retreats, online classes, etc.


jvogtman


Apr 14, 2008, 12:27 PM

Post #178 of 213 (3712 views)
Shortcut
Re: [aiyamei] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post

I figure I'll throw my thoughts in here too, because certain things you have discussed beg for another point of view.

Your opinion is definitely a useful one to have out there, esp. when there probably are a lot of writers fresh out of undergrad who think the only way to "become a writer" is to get an MFA, which I agree is an unfortunate way of thinking. However, I think most of us on this forum are not trying to "become" writers--we are writers, and we have thought long and hard about getting an MFA, taking into consideration all our other options, including the ones you pointed out.

In my own experience (and I venture to guess some others have had a similar experience), I got out of undergrad with tons and tons of debt, got a hugely time consuming job to pay for it, and tried to write whenever I found the time, and snuck in reading during my breaks at work and wrote down story ideas on post-its. I come from a rather lower middle class background, so it has never been an option for me to lead a "trail-blazing" life. And I think most people are in the same boat--we must work to survive, and unfortunately working a lot takes away so much writing time that it would take so so much longer to finish that book, and then who knows if it will ever be published? I think a lot of people decide to get MFAs not because it's the only option for them, not because they have a burning desire to become "a part of the American literary-academic system, a fellowship here, a grant there, a life of applications" (which is ridiculous to assume anyone's life could be reduced to), but because the option IS out there, and it does truly seem the best option--one gets funded time to write, feedback from other hardworking writers, a community, connections to the literary world, teaching and/or editing opportunities, and let's face it, it is much much easier to get published when one has an MFA from a well-known school. It might sound cynical, or depressing, but isn't it the truth? I'm not saying the only way to be a writer is to have an MFA (I doubt anyone here thinks that), but that for some people, sadly? or maybe not so sadly?, the MFA is quite possibly the only way to start a successful writing career. The art can be developed without the degree, but the "career" can't, I don't think, for a lot of people. (Obviously I realize there are exceptions).

And while I'm not at all some kind of cheerleader for MFA programs, I have to take issue with what you wrote about skipping an MFA (mainly for the aesthetics they promote):

1. The anxiety of influence--that's all around us anyway, and there's really no escaping it. By skipping an MFA program one is not bypassing the anxiety of influence, as long as one continues to read lit journals and other literature. And if one is a strong enough writer one can bypass the anxiety of influence anyway. I think the benefits of having a literary community far outweigh the detriments. Only if one is a really weak writer will one be swayed to write the way one's peers are writing.

2&3&4. Art vs. life--As Flaubert and other writers throughout history have suggested, life IS sometimes ancillary to art. A writer does not need an intense, passionate, crazy life to write passionately and intensely. And one does not need to travel to a particular place to write about it, or work a particular job to write about it. Isn't that the whole point of imagination? Isn't that the whole point of fiction, of art? We are not merely describing events in our life (that would be creative nonfiction, no?) we are creating a life on the page. Also, just because one makes the choice to get an MFA or a fellowship or one works in academia does not preclude the person from living a beautiful, interesting life. In fact, I think if we all stopped living right now, and confined ourselves to desks for the rest of our lives, we'd still all have more than enough to write about because one mundane day of some everyman's life (even if that everyman is a professor and works in academia) is more than enough to make a great piece of literature (as proven by countless authors, esp. Joyce).

Sorry if this comes across as sharp; I just felt the need to defend not MFA programs but those who decide to attend them. Ultimately it's a personal decision, and I think most people (hopefully; I have faith in people's intelligence) think long and hard and weigh all their options before deciding to apply.


Blanca78


Apr 14, 2008, 12:35 PM

Post #179 of 213 (3700 views)
Shortcut
Re: [LaurenS] Need to be published to get an MFA [In reply to] Can't Post

I don't know, I'm definitely not an expert, but I just don't buy that prior publications matter when it comes to being accepted to a program. I know of at least one person who published extensively and didn't get in. I have not published and got into three good fiction programs and was wait listed at a fourth. At the open house for the program I'm attending (Ohio State), I didn't meet a single person with publications prior to admission, although several of the current students have publishing while in the program (including one who got a book deal with Doubleday his second year, but that's an amazing story unto itself). I don't think publication or lack thereof affects someone's "right" to attend an MFA program. In the end, to me, it's about someone deciding that he or she desires the time and space to write that a program offers, but most of all, to learn and grow as a writer; I think application readers are sensitive to the desire to learn. I know that's what I emphasized in my statement of purpose. I applied because I felt I was at a point in my writing where I needed to push it further and I knew I would benefit from being in a more rigorous community of writers than I have encountered in my every day life. For me, the academic framework is ideal for that, but other people might not need it.


LaurenS


Apr 14, 2008, 1:02 PM

Post #180 of 213 (3646 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Blanca78] Need to be published to get an MFA [In reply to] Can't Post

I just got in somewhere without being published, so it certainly can be done.

I guess the main conclusion that I can come to is basically what many have already said: admissions are more competitive than ever, and writers from all over the experience map are applying.

It's hard out here for a pimp of ideas.


Vesuvia


Apr 14, 2008, 2:14 PM

Post #181 of 213 (3592 views)
Shortcut
Re: [jvogtman] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post

Well said!


ejdifili
Emily

Apr 14, 2008, 4:11 PM

Post #182 of 213 (3532 views)
Shortcut
Re: [jvogtman] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
In my own experience (and I venture to guess some others have had a similar experience), I got out of undergrad with tons and tons of debt, got a hugely time consuming job to pay for it, and tried to write whenever I found the time, and snuck in reading during my breaks at work and wrote down story ideas on post-its. I come from a rather lower middle class background, so it has never been an option for me to lead a "trail-blazing" life. And I think most people are in the same boat--we must work to survive, and unfortunately working a lot takes away so much writing time that it would take so so much longer to finish that book, and then who knows if it will ever be published?


I think many people have had valid perspectives on this topic, including aiyamei. I agree that many writers, sadly, become so focused on getting into MFA programs that they lose sight of their actual work. I myself have written very little this past year because I have spent most of my free time applying to MFA programs and agonizing over my lack of acceptances. That's my own fault, though.

At the same time, I have to agree with jvogtman's above sentiments. My job, teaching high school, holds a tremendous amount of responsibility and time commitment. However, I chose this occupation because I love it and it gives me inspiration. I guess I could give it up for a less "demanding" cube job, but that would make me (personally) so miserable that I wouldn't be able to write. Furthermore, I'm unfortunately not in a position to structure my whole life around my desire to write. That is, I can't just pack up and retreat to rural Tuscany for six months to work on my novel.

I would, however, be able to structure my entire life around writing--for 2-3 years, anyway--if I were in an MFA program. Thus, the desire to attend.


gcsumfa


Apr 14, 2008, 5:05 PM

Post #183 of 213 (3479 views)
Shortcut
Re: Glyph [In reply to] Can't Post

I think there has been a lot of overreaction to Glyph's post. Considering the sensitive time right now (people dealing with rejections), this is understandable. But…

He/she posted one letter from one MFA program director. However, the reality is that most MFA graduates never publish a word AFTER earning their MFA’s, so I seriously doubt that his or her post was anything more than a tremendous exception.

Also, sometimes I think grad directors exaggerate when breaking the tough news. Supposedly, every application season is "amazing...and the field is filled with 1,000 Updikes and Zadie Smiths.” Whatever.

Publishing shouldn't be rushed; worry about writing publishable material (or promising material with the potential to be published) before worrying about whether or not you're "published." I know a lot of writers who published stuff way too early in questionable venues, and many of these folks now wish they could "unpublish” that poem in the “Rat’s Ass Review: An Online Journal of Literature.” Also, it often takes a year or two for a story to poem to even appear in a print journal or magazine, not to mention 4-6 months just to have the piece accepted, so you're already short on time between now and the next application season.

Also, even if his post is somewhat true, it's certainly only true for the most competitive programs. If you only apply to the Brown's and UVA's and Iowa's of the world and ignore the smaller, less prestigious programs with committed, hungry teachers, decent literary journals, and solid funding, you can't really complain.


(This post was edited by gcsumfa on Apr 14, 2008, 5:13 PM)


__________



Apr 14, 2008, 5:37 PM

Post #184 of 213 (3447 views)
Shortcut
Re: [gcsumfa] Glyph [In reply to] Can't Post

   

"...part of the American literary-academic system, a fellowship here, a grant there, a life of applications..."

Sadly, it does happen -- a least, it happened to a couple of my teachers. No books yet, and the stories they putter around are all about the sad, lonely plight of the associate professor. Their life suffers, their art suffers. Reminds me of that Onion headline: Tow-Truck Driver Has Great Idea For Tow-Truck Movie.

So one vote for rural Tuscany. I guess that's what Fulbrights are for.

Anyhoo, I don't mean to offend published authors either (someday I hope to become one!). I know some published authors would relish the learning opportunity. It's just that others, including the ones I know (and the ones who already have an MFA) do not. They would relish the subsidized free time, the break from a bitter job search. They're already published (and publishing) and aren't entirely gung-ho about community or critiques. That's all I'm saying.

And if you read closely, this doesn't contradict fiorava's post (which was very thoughtful, and I'm grateful for). Nutshell: it's hard finding a job, and people will do anything for time, money. (What I don't get, though, is why some of these severally degreed people don't just get a job outside of academia...)



six five four three two one 0 ->

(This post was edited by Junior Maas on Apr 14, 2008, 5:40 PM)


gcsumfa


Apr 14, 2008, 5:51 PM

Post #185 of 213 (3427 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Junior Maas] Glyph [In reply to] Can't Post

I’d also like to address this idea of the MFA giving students “time to write”…while it’s certainly true that the MFA experience gives one “time to write” (compared to many other “real world” jobs), many new MFA students naively entire programs with the idea that they’ll spend all of their time writing. Let’s see…in my MFA program, I taught a 2/2 load of freshman comp (hard work if done correctly…and certainly tiring, not to mention brain deadening once one reads the 50th essay about little Johnny crashing his father’s SUV on the way to the SR prom), edited the literary journal, and took literature seminars in addition to my workshops. I probably spent 40 hours per week (sometimes more) on teaching freshman comp (class prep and grading in addition to teaching), editing the literary journal, and doing work for my literature classes in addition to all of this supposed “time to write.”

Then there's the issue of the summer (or summers) between years. Many programs only fund students for the academic year. So what are you going to do that summer in between your 1st and 2nd year? You'll probably have to find a summer job in order to eat/supplement your stipend, though some folks borrow loan money in the fall and put it away for the summer.

So, really, the point is that there’s no way around the fact that finding time to write is hard—even if you’re in an MFA program.


aiyamei

e-mail user

Apr 14, 2008, 8:58 PM

Post #186 of 213 (3357 views)
Shortcut
Re: [jvogtman] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post

I feel bad about returning to this topic of the relative value of the MFA in general, since it's not actually the topic of the thread...but jvogtman's long post is so full of interesting things that I hope I'll be pardoned.

First of all a caveat: basically jvogtman is right about everything. But I am also right, and I'll continue the argument so as to make a house in which anti-MFA dreams can live, mine and those of others. I know that not everyone has these dreams, and if you want to go to another house -- again, I'm not trying to talk anyone out of it. I'm just trying to offer an alternate romance.

Secondly, in arguing that a non-MFA writing career can be hewn, I'd like to make it clear that I'm not coming from a position of hereditary wealth, parental support, spousal support, or what have you. I'm currently supporting myself -- barely. I'm living on lentils. They are extremely cheap and apparently with rice make a complete protein, or so I've been told. They're actually quite delicious. The reason that I've been living for weeks on these things (I also eat outmeal sometimes) is so that I can live where I need to live in the city in Europe in which my novel takes place, where I am still in the throes of the passions that gave rise to it, while I devote what feels like herculean energy to the final brawl with that novel, and what a brawl it has been, and how much my agent, who plucked me out of the slush pile, has poured into critique of that novel at this point, to the extent that I'm embarrassed. So just to get it out of the way: if "trail-blazing" is going to be read here as bohemian, international, holly-golightly, bizarre, then you can lead a trail-blazing life with a lower middle-class background. Actually you can do it with any kind of background. Finances are not the issue. Flexibility is the issue. If anyone wants to know how they can go to Tuscany for six months and work on their novel, all without a trust fund, just pm me. The idea that it is somehow ok to suspend a career (as a highschool teacher in your case, ejdfil) in order to go to an MFA program, but that it is not alright to suspend that career in order to put the exact same amount of time and energy into writing a book, is something that is simply an evil of our age.

Thirdly, the idea that you don't need to experience things in order to have enough to write about, that your imagination is enough -- is a position that holds sway at the moment, but it is not necessarily right, especially not for everyone (and incidentally I could go into a long argument to prove that most writers whose works have stayed with us over time have lived very intense and interesting lives, or sought out experience in the most intense manner, not Flaubertian at all. Speaking of whom, the famous bourgeois himself was actually pretty insane during his travels in Africa.) The point is that the argument of not needing experience is important to us right now because it counters that modernist fallacy of our parents' generation, that the only real school of fiction is the school of hard knocks. And yes, you're right that that is a position that needs to be countered. Of course writing can be taught in an academic setting, and should be taught there too. And yes, you can write for a lifetime only using what experience you have after having survived your childhood, and that's well and good if it works for you, if it _feels_ like it's enough to you personally.

But what if instead of that you want to write about things that no child could dream of, that you know you yourself could not have dreamt of only one year ago? And what if the crucible of the process of discovery-of-undreamt-of-life/acute-experience/transformation-of-experience-into-prose is more important to you than the prose itself, although you'll be damned if you don't learn every prose technique as well, by the way, in order to harness it to those stories of which you and others could not have dreamt if you yourself had not gone for them to the edge of the volcano? Jvogtman, could it be that you do not believe in the existence of the volcano? To be clear, I am by no means saying that you can only find it abroad, or in other odd locales. I'm saying you can only find it outside your comfort zone, and that may well mean leaving the loop of social identifications, groups, programs, etc. I have spent enough of my life applying for things and being a part of programs, within the politics of groups, that I know that they can easily become the central drama and concern of one's life; yes, maybe a dying relative or a love affair intrudes with something more true and violent now and then, but the lazy melodrama of prestige and social identification CAN take over the majority of thought energy, and often does -- and so I stand by what I said before.

But again, my arguments before and now are more passionate than I actually feel -- they are meant as an encouragement to those who have had the good fortune (?) to be rejected from programs!


owenj


Apr 15, 2008, 1:53 AM

Post #187 of 213 (3261 views)
Shortcut
Re: [aiyamei] Need to be published to get an MFA? [In reply to] Can't Post

Another point - all the people who published prior to getting MFAs somehow found the time to write and improve, so maybe not a bad way to do it? Wait a few years, see if you're really committed, then re-apply? I waited a few years between my BA and MA and then again before heading off to get a PhD - had shitty jobs, all that, but still managed to find time to write and get better, published, got fellowships, etc - so it's not like you have to do one or the other.


vmsf


Apr 17, 2008, 7:14 PM

Post #188 of 213 (3116 views)
Shortcut
Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

To change the topic a bit, I'm wondering if anyone has advice for first-time writing teachers. As part of my MFA program, I’m required to teach 1 class per semester, alternating between creative writing and comp. I'm thrilled but a little apprehensive. Any advice or resources you can recommend are much appreciated, from the practical (how to balance writing time and teaching time, etc) to the pedagogical (how to teach specific writing topics, etc). Feel free to PM me.

Thanks so much!


sicofelephants


e-mail user

Apr 18, 2008, 1:56 AM

Post #189 of 213 (3026 views)
Shortcut
Re: [vmsf] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Yeah, I'm wondering the same thing. I have to start teaching classes at UT the first semester I get there. WOO YEAH. I'll totally do it for the money they're giving me.

A lot of places will require you to take a class on how to teach. Not sure about your particular school, though. Still, even if you take a class on teaching, it'll be concurrent with the class you're having to TA for the first time. Ah well. Most jobs I've had just throw you out into the wild and make you find things out for yourself.

And you could always take hints from mistakes you've seen your own professors make. Like, don't talk to your students during a mid-term exam about their weekend plans and then expect them to take you *entirely* seriously. Haha. Personally, I don't have a problem with that, but a lot of students like to see their instructors exercise their authority. Otherwise you come off as incompetent. A "noob", if you will.


(This post was edited by sicofelephants on Apr 18, 2008, 1:58 AM)


LaurenS


Apr 18, 2008, 9:23 AM

Post #190 of 213 (2989 views)
Shortcut
Re: [vmsf] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Book recommendations:

Tobin, Lad. Writing Relationships: What Really Happens in the Composition Class.

Moffett, James. Active Voice: A Writing Program Across the Curriculum.


vmsf


Apr 18, 2008, 11:30 AM

Post #191 of 213 (2937 views)
Shortcut
Re: [LaurenS] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

thanks!


vmsf


Apr 18, 2008, 10:24 PM

Post #192 of 213 (2823 views)
Shortcut
Re: [sicofelephants] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Just picked up 3 books that I'm finding helpful:

Writers as Teachers, Teachers as Writers
Jonathan Baumbach, ed.

Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft
Janet Burroway

The Writing Workshop Notebook: Notes on Creating and Workshopping
Alan Ziegler


AncaLS


Apr 30, 2008, 1:40 PM

Post #193 of 213 (2631 views)
Shortcut
Re: [vmsf] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Books I've found helpful:

Nuts & Bolts, edited by Thomas Newkirk
Writing at the Threshold by Larry Weinstein
Writing Without Teachers by Peter Elbow

Useful websites:
http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/teachtip.htm#questions

For all things grammar & more:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
I love OWL.


vmsf


Apr 30, 2008, 1:59 PM

Post #194 of 213 (2625 views)
Shortcut
Re: [AncaLS] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks, AncaLS!


AncaLS


Apr 30, 2008, 2:46 PM

Post #195 of 213 (2613 views)
Shortcut
Re: [vmsf] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

You're welcome!

That writing-teaching balance is pretty precarious (for me, at least). I've been teaching comp. for the past year and ESL before that. Writing and teaching have always butt heads.

Now that I'm looking into MFA programs (for 2009?), I know that I don't want to teach more than one comp. class a semester (if I can help it) while I'm back in school and focusing as much as possible on fiction writing.


vmsf


Apr 30, 2008, 4:57 PM

Post #196 of 213 (2567 views)
Shortcut
Re: [AncaLS] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

It's helpful for me to know that you've found it challenging to balance your writing and teaching. If you have any tips, I'd be interested in hearing them. Also, I'm sure you're well versed in the MFA application process, but if not, please PM me with any questions. I feel like I've learned a tremendous amount in the past 6 months, both from my own experience and from others on this message board and elsewhere.

Best of luck to you!


ejdifili
Emily

Apr 30, 2008, 5:13 PM

Post #197 of 213 (2557 views)
Shortcut
Re: [vmsf] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
It's helpful for me to know that you've found it challenging to balance your writing and teaching. If you have any tips, I'd be interested in hearing them.


Personally, I find that teaching taxes my creativity in a somewhat similar manner as writing. That is, I have had other jobs that basically involved filing, organizational tasks, etc., and these use a different part of your brain, I think. As a teacher, you have to come up with new ideas every day to keep the students' attention. I find that, after school, I don't have much brain power or physical energy left for writing. Besides that, teaching can be very time-consuming.

My advice would be, first of all, to take full advantage of summer or any other breaks: write as much as possible during these times. Also, try to block out some time on the weekend for writing. For some people, it works to write in the morning. I'm not a morning person, so I couldn't see myself getting up at 5am to work, but some people do it. That way, at least your brain is still fresh.

Granted, I have been pretty bad about finding time to write over the last year, actually. It's my own fault, of course, but teaching--especially full time, and especially if you work with kids--is very draining.

In the end, as a teacher of any level, you may often feel like your work is never done. There are always more papers to grade, more lessons to plan, more things you could be doing. Sometimes you just have to drop it all and focus on writing for a few hours.


captaintodd
Todd Thomas


Apr 30, 2008, 5:56 PM

Post #198 of 213 (2538 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ejdifili] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

I would love to be a crayon-yellow happy sun drawn by loose hands, with beaming arms of encouragement, BUT I have mostly negative things to say about teaching. The amount of work it is, compared with every other job i've ever had (and i've had a lot!), is just huge! And the pay is clearly just average to low. It's a CRIME! And they expect you to to be some sage source of knowledge, ever-spouting with creativity and energy to communicate. You suddenly play a political role as a presenter and a rep. of a school. You're on your feet all day! The facets of your job are never-ending.

I've been able to get the most writing done while working as an accountant. As a teacher, I think I wrote two poems the entire year. I think there is much to be said about using another part of your head and finding work that doesnt require daily planning and grading on top of doing the actual work...

THAT SAID, teaching puts you in touch with a hundred interesting minds, everyone just pouring over new material. That experience has to offer up something precious, right? Inspiration? Beauty? Mastery of subject? Yes to all!! Time for yourself? Not unless you don't need your sleep / want to feel like you're always taking yourself away from your teaching...

Now, part-time teaching like most programs offer to you is another thing. I'm just speaking from my experience teaching full-time while trying to maintain some kind of writing life.


ejdifili
Emily

Apr 30, 2008, 6:22 PM

Post #199 of 213 (2527 views)
Shortcut
Re: [captaintodd] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I would love to be a crayon-yellow happy sun drawn by loose hands, with beaming arms of encouragement, BUT I have mostly negative things to say about teaching. The amount of work it is, compared with every other job i've ever had (and i've had a lot!), is just huge! And the pay is clearly just average to low. It's a CRIME! And they expect you to to be some sage source of knowledge, ever-spouting with creativity and energy to communicate. You suddenly play a political role as a presenter and a rep. of a school. You're on your feet all day! The facets of your job are never-ending.


The crayon sun image is amusing :)

I agree that teaching is not for everyone. This is why it can be a good experience to teach part time for a couple of semesters as a grad student. You can find out if you like the work or not without being involved in some heavy job contract, or thrown in for a year with a bunch of demonic teenagers.

Personally, I like teaching. And thank God, because it's really the ONLY professional occupation I seem to enjoy. Other than writing, obviously, but I don't count on ever living exclusively off that.


(This post was edited by ejdifili on Apr 30, 2008, 6:23 PM)


pongo
Buy this book!

e-mail user

Apr 30, 2008, 6:49 PM

Post #200 of 213 (2517 views)
Shortcut
Re: [ejdifili] Advice for first-time teachers [In reply to] Can't Post

Teaching is the best thing I've ever done for money.

That won't be true for everyone, but it is true for at least one.


The Review Mirror, available at www.unsolicitedpress.com

Difficult Listening, Sundays from ten to noon (Central time), at http://www.radiofreenashville.org/.

http://home.comcast.net/~david.m.harris/site/

First page Previous page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next page Last page  View All

Main Index » Writing and Publishing » MFA Programs

 


P&W Newsletters

Sign up to receive our monthly email newsletter to stay informed of the latest news, events and more.

Click to Sign Up

Subscribe to P&W Magazine | Donate Now | Advertise | Sign up for E-Newsletter | About Us | Contact Us

© Copyright Poets & Writers 2011. All Rights Reserved