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klondike


Dec 4, 2009, 9:30 AM

Post #1276 of 2090 (16637 views)
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Re: [spamela] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post

Thanks for the info, Tabby and Spamela.


GDClark
George David Clark
e-mail user

Dec 4, 2009, 12:10 PM

Post #1277 of 2090 (16612 views)
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Re: [klondike] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post

USC is 2/2 with 2 (fully-funded) years off from all teaching duties over the course of your time there (usually your first and last years) the rest of the time PhDs teach comp.

Texas Tech is 2/2 also, with one (fully-funded) year off from teaching duties, but you never have to teach comp if you don't want to. Instead, you teach intorductory workshops or sophmore level lit classes.

In my experience the workload for a workshop can be much lighter than a comp load. I'd probably rather teach two smallish workshops than one large section of comp.


HarveyK


Dec 4, 2009, 3:26 PM

Post #1278 of 2090 (16584 views)
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Re: [Forum Apps] Statement of Purpose for PhD Applications [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I was just wondering if any poets have thought about applying to SUNY Buffalo or Berkeley English? These are decidedly NOT programs with creative dissertations. Yet, a lot of great poets graduate from them. They arenít included on many of the lists or on the rankings. There might be more programs like this. I just thought Iíd throw them out there to maybe open up some possibilities for people.

It's almost inseparable between critical theory and poetry writing these days, so it's a good idea to go to an MFA program in an English dept with a highly ranked English Ph.D. program. SUNY Buffalo has a funding problem, and Berkeley is HARD to get in--their applicant pool is not like the MFA applicant pool. Cornell, Irvine, and Brown have both strong MFA and English Ph.D. programs. You can also try U Penn, Chicago, Duke and others.



Forum Apps


Dec 4, 2009, 4:31 PM

Post #1279 of 2090 (16552 views)
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Re: [HarveyK] Statement of Purpose for PhD Applications [In reply to] Can't Post

There is funding at Buffalo if you get into the PhD program. That is a HARD admit though. I decided against applying after finding this out.

Great list, btw. I agree with it. I guess I was just mentioning the TOP schools that I KNOW have produced great poets (having read books by them and such). But U Penn for sure should be in the top there, too.

I'd add:
SUNY Albany.
Harvard (I don't REALLY want to add them but I guess we should PhD wise).
UT Austin.
UW Milwaukee (they have a creative dissertation too... but modernist studies or film studies for poets, too).
New School (worse funding than Buffalo, and that is saying something).
Ohio University (again they have a creative dissertation option, too)


HollinsMFAer
Luke Johnson


Dec 4, 2009, 5:35 PM

Post #1280 of 2090 (16537 views)
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Re: [Forum Apps] Statement of Purpose for PhD Applications [In reply to] Can't Post

Just to chime in, Albany also has a creative dissertation. Though, like Buffalo, their funding is spotty.


http://www.lukejohnsonpoetry.com


LesK
Les
e-mail user

Dec 4, 2009, 5:36 PM

Post #1281 of 2090 (16536 views)
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Re: [klondike] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post


Quote
I'm wondering if anyone else can give us info on the teaching loads for phd programs? Stephkarto says Missouri is, for most, 2/2. Is that about standard? Are there any programs that offer 1/1?


The University of Cincinnati has a 1/1/1, as well. It's on a quarter system, like Ohio University.

We also have opportunities to teach several levels of Composition (101, 102, & possibly Advanced Comp). We also, typically by the second year, teach within our genres, so there's a broad range of experience available to us as grad students at UC (as well as couple of ways to get funding w/out teaching for a quarter or two when you're further along in the program).


Forum Apps


Dec 4, 2009, 6:12 PM

Post #1282 of 2090 (16529 views)
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Re: [HollinsMFAer] Statement of Purpose for PhD Applications [In reply to] Can't Post

True enough. Forgot about that. They are like UW - Milwaukee I'd say... like, in terms of having amazing theory profs.

Oh. Syracuse also popped in my head while typing this. Great theory faculty.


gcsumfa


Dec 5, 2009, 8:53 PM

Post #1283 of 2090 (16464 views)
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Re: [klondike] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
I'm wondering if anyone else can give us info on the teaching loads for phd programs? Stephkarto says Missouri is, for most, 2/2. Is that about standard? Are there any programs that offer 1/1?


WMU is a 1/1 of creative writing (intro to creative writing and advanced fiction or poetry) from beginning to end (if you're funded).


(This post was edited by gcsumfa on Dec 5, 2009, 8:53 PM)


HarveyK


Dec 6, 2009, 1:33 PM

Post #1284 of 2090 (16411 views)
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Re: [klondike] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Quote
I'm wondering if anyone else can give us info on the teaching loads for phd programs? Stephkarto says Missouri is, for most, 2/2. Is that about standard? Are there any programs that offer 1/1?


The problem is more of how much you're paid. Some programs pay you something like 10K for 2/2, which sounds like indentured slavery to me.


Tabby


e-mail user

Dec 6, 2009, 2:36 PM

Post #1285 of 2090 (16395 views)
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Re: [HarveyK] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

Quote
I'm wondering if anyone else can give us info on the teaching loads for phd programs? Stephkarto says Missouri is, for most, 2/2. Is that about standard? Are there any programs that offer 1/1?


The problem is more of how much you're paid. Some programs pay you something like 10K for 2/2, which sounds like indentured slavery to me.



http://www.kellykathleenferguson.com


Forum Apps


Dec 6, 2009, 3:04 PM

Post #1286 of 2090 (16389 views)
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Re: [HarveyK] University of Missouri [In reply to] Can't Post

Yeah. That sounds unpleasant. They might have some setup with very small classes or sections of a large lecture and want more individual attention. It may be better or worse that in sounds simply stated as a "2/2 load of 10k"

Still, sounds like a lot of work for what you'll be paid.


bktv


Dec 6, 2009, 6:12 PM

Post #1287 of 2090 (16367 views)
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Re: [Teaching loads] [In reply to] Can't Post

Tennessee is 2/2, although there are 2-3 fellowships that reduce the load to 1/1 or 1/2.


franz

e-mail user

Jan 2, 2010, 1:20 PM

Post #1288 of 2090 (16065 views)
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Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi Persephassa,
How are you liking the program at DU? I'm considering applying to the PhD program there (living in the Boulder area now after a year abroad). I've been combing through this thread but haven't been able to find out much in the way of actual details about the program.

How's the funding? I've heard that three years of funding is typical. Are you teaching, and if so, how is that going? How is the faculty? What would you say are the pros and cons of the program? Do you feel that the program prefers experimental writing? (I know that your own work is in that direction.)

Thanks for any wisdom you care to impart. As for anyone else looking at this thread, substantial info about DU's program would be much appreciated.


Franz Knupfer, author of short stories and novels


persephassa
roxanne carter

Jan 2, 2010, 3:45 PM

Post #1289 of 2090 (16045 views)
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Re: [franz] Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

i like it very much.

yes, three years of funding. there are a handful of 4th year funding options, but they are competitive. most people in the creative writing track graduate in 3 years; i plan to because i want to move away (i love denver but my partner is on the market now so we are hoping to be elsewhere). i haven't taught at DU yet - i teach in the spring, and then 2 courses in my 3rd year. we do TA; my assignment for this year is with laird hunt (that is for one quarter). i love the faculty here... bin ramke, selah saterstrom, laird & eleni sikelianos, brian kiteley, etc. they are really lovely people and workshops have been grand. the faculty on the lit side is a bit dry and weird and i don't think that most of the lit classes offered are very interesting (for instance, i have a class on modernity and everything we'll read was written by a man, whatever). hmm experimental writing; if you read the faculty's books you do get a sense of what they are into which extends and merges with our interests... well, you should come to the student readings! i am in charge of setting them up for this year - i haven't set the exact dates for winter/spring yet but i think they will be on the school's website soon.

they used to make us work in the university writing center for our first year (i had to do it). that was horrible and they have finally ceased that requirement. it was like 12 hours a week (reduced from 20 the year before) helping people with their grammar. i don't mind helping people but the type of work was not what i wld consider proper for someone pursuing their phd. anyhow that is over with, except they offer it to you still for a bonus on top of yr stipend - DON"T DO IT!!! the amount is so tiny compared to the agony of working there. now they give people administrative assignments, which is much better.

pros: everything is paid for and you can live on the stipend without borrowing (i do)
they have a good health services place on campus
the library is great (better than the library at brown, although i do miss the rare books libraries there, which DU has none of)
you can take tutorials after your first year, which is meeting with a professor perhaps alone or with a couple other people - you can propose a tutorial, so this way you can study something of interest to you not offered by the department
our department has a big tree and a skylight in the lounge
you get to live in denver and there is a lot to do here. when i was on the east coast i really missed being outdoors but here we can go snowshoeing & hiking & all sorts of stuff we never did in RI

con: the school overall (not our department) is very conservative and has many, many MBAs and law school students and you can tell this because of how it is run as an institution (for instance, we can only take 2.5 courses a quarter; you cannot take more without paying $$$. at brown or where i did my undergrad (UCSB) i could have taken as many classes as i wanted without a penalty like that)
also, yr ability to take courses outside the department is severely limited... i miss a more interdisciplinary atmosphere; everyone in yr classes will be from your department - very rarely is there anyone form another department
i owe the library late fees which never happened at brown (not that i wasn't late)
there isn't really anywhere good to eat around campus, except now they do have illegal pete's and everyone gets coffee at kalladi's which is passable
the building our department is in is terrible, like a prison

that's all that comes immediately... i hope that helped :)


# www.persephassa.com

(This post was edited by persephassa on Jan 2, 2010, 3:48 PM)


franz

e-mail user

Jan 4, 2010, 12:41 PM

Post #1290 of 2090 (15932 views)
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Re: [persephassa] Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

Persephassa,
Thanks for your very helpful observations on the program. I'm considerably more enthusiastic about the prospect of applying there now. How is it that most of the students finish their PhD in three years? Is it because they usually have a novel finished by the time they'd start work on a dissertation? Do you feel like you have enough time to work on your writing?

My one other question: do they seem to care much about the lit subject GREs? I haven't taken that yet, and I'm not too thrilled about taking another standardized test. From the website, it seems somewhat de-emphasized.

I know what you mean about being close to nature. I did my MFA at Hopkins (another pretty conservative school, though the students were very smart) and it was too far away from all the great nature that's in the west. Compared to Boulder, even Denver seems far away from the mountains now. But it's still a lot better than Baltimore.

Now I remember you from Speakeasy from a few years back, since we were both using this forum at the same time before getting into our respective MFA programs. I'm glad to hear you had a good experience at Brown and that you're enjoying DU so far.


Franz Knupfer, author of short stories and novels


persephassa
roxanne carter

Jan 5, 2010, 10:29 PM

Post #1291 of 2090 (15813 views)
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Re: [franz] Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

hey franz.

yeah, 3 years because you can work on it all along vs. the literature and rhetoric students who can't really start dissertating until after comps (beginning of 3rd year). i feel like i have enough time but perhaps i am a bad example - i write compulsively; i know some of my friends do get stressed about classes and all the reading and etcetera we have to do, but overall i think people do write fairly often, which you can see by the books published by people in the program while they've been here (sandy florian, jen tynes, joanna ruocco, dave wirthlin, arda collins, eric baus, etc all have books out recently).

and the lit GRES: i filled mine out randomly and then left after about 30 minutes, so there you go. i think there was one question about stein and one about barthes... the rest???! some people take it after they have been accepted, which is kind of funny.

good luck!


# www.persephassa.com


klondike


Jan 6, 2010, 5:15 PM

Post #1292 of 2090 (15751 views)
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Re: [persephassa] Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

I had similar questions about DU's program, so thanks for your insight, persephassa. One more question: Do you know if recent graduates are having luck finding teaching jobs?


persephassa
roxanne carter

Jan 6, 2010, 5:32 PM

Post #1293 of 2090 (15746 views)
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Re: [klondike] Program at DU [In reply to] Can't Post

i don't really know. i don't see many of the 3rd or 4th year students who are graduating this year as they don't take classes. probably they would need to find luck tho, yes; the market is in terrible shape.


# www.persephassa.com


bluebird421


Jan 15, 2010, 7:49 PM

Post #1294 of 2090 (15523 views)
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Re: [freeverses] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post

I'd just like to add to what LesK said about the University of Cincinnati. It's a great setup as far as workload (1/1/1), and the funding is guaranteed for everyone, for the long-term. This is important because, as I was recently disappointed to find out, some schools don't offer funding to everyone and sometimes they only guarantee funding for 2 or 3 years (nowhere near enough time to complete coursework and write a dissertation).

Also, UC students are really doing some great things. I'm a poetry PhD, so I can't speak as much to the fiction side of things, though I know current fiction students have been published in Playboy, Esquire, Best New American Voices, Best Fantasy, etc. As for poetry,I believe that at last count, current students have published 9 full-length collections and numerous chapbooks. Also, current students have won a Ruth Lilly fellowship, a Stegner fellowship, and have been published in the Best American Poetry and Best New Poets anthologies.

I've really enjoyed UC so far, and it's great to be in the company of such talented and productive writers. I would encourage anyone who's interested not only to apply to the program, but to feel free to contact me with any questions.


(This post was edited by bluebird421 on Jan 15, 2010, 7:52 PM)


Rambler


Jan 17, 2010, 3:47 PM

Post #1295 of 2090 (15395 views)
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Re: [bluebird421] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post

Bluebird321,
Can you tell us how many people U of C usually accepts? Is it the same for fiction and poetry? I've applied to their Ph.D. program for fiction and am intensely curious as to acceptance rates...


LesK
Les
e-mail user

Jan 17, 2010, 9:12 PM

Post #1296 of 2090 (15354 views)
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Re: [Rambler] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post

I can answer that, I think. Historically, they've had 9 incoming PhD slots and divide that amongst poetry, fiction, lit, and comp. This past year, there were three incoming poets. The year before, four, I think. This past year, for fiction, there were four incoming PhD's--but one is having his paid for by the company he works for (crazy, huh?)

In terms of acceptances, my perception is that they'll only accept for the slots they have (they won't over-accept), but this does mean it's possible to come in off the waitlist...

This is, however, only my perception of how things have gone.

Regardless, good luck, Rambler!

-Les


bluebird421


Jan 18, 2010, 1:06 PM

Post #1297 of 2090 (15298 views)
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Re: [LesK] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post

This sounds about right. They typically accept 3 per genre, but based on funding/slots can go anywhere from 2-4 (I think that's pretty standard for PhD programs--the only real anomaly I know of is FSU, which accepts a large number of people per genre).

Hope this helps. Good luck with your applications!


(This post was edited by bluebird421 on Jan 18, 2010, 1:09 PM)


LesK
Les
e-mail user

Jan 18, 2010, 1:41 PM

Post #1298 of 2090 (15279 views)
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Re: [bluebird421] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post

 

Quote
the only real anomaly I know of is FSU, which accepts a large number of people per genre).


I think Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Nebraska are also anomalies, but those schools do accept without funding. I've no idea what their funded acceptances look like, though perhaps someone from those schools can speak to that. Oh, and this wholly unsubstantiated, but I seem to remember Houston having a relatively large cohort for some reason....again, a UH student would be in a better position to speak to this than myself.

But, yes, generally speaking most of the CW PhDs have small cohorts for PhDs and larger MA or MFA cohorts.

-Les


gcsumfa


Jan 19, 2010, 12:43 AM

Post #1299 of 2090 (15220 views)
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Re: [LesK] creative writing ph.d. ? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To

Quote
the only real anomaly I know of is FSU, which accepts a large number of people per genre).


I think Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Nebraska are also anomalies, but those schools do accept without funding. I've no idea what their funded acceptances look like, though perhaps someone from those schools can speak to that. Oh, and this wholly unsubstantiated, but I seem to remember Houston having a relatively large cohort for some reason....again, a UH student would be in a better position to speak to this than myself.

But, yes, generally speaking most of the CW PhDs have small cohorts for PhDs and larger MA or MFA cohorts.

-Les


When I applied to programs, I remember being peeved that UC "waitlisted" a large number of applicants. However, looking back, I admire UC's stance on only admitting students who can be funded; it's the ethical thing to do, and more programs should follow UC's lead in this area.


Star101


Jan 29, 2010, 1:55 PM

Post #1300 of 2090 (14986 views)
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UT Dallas [In reply to] Can't Post

Does anyone know anything about the PhD in Humanities with a concentration in Aesthetics at the University of Texas at Dallas?

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