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pongo
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May 3, 2010, 7:37 PM

Post #2176 of 2652 (17954 views)
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Re: [evemorton] Accepted to two colleges...lol...now what? [In reply to] Can't Post

Would you rather write science fiction novels for your main writing career, or screenplays? That's the choice.

There's a lot more money in screenplays than in novels. Especially science fiction novels.

I would say that Goddard is the infinitely better choice, but that's mostly because of my vast prejudice as a Goddard grad. But you also get to spend ten days each winter in Vermont, which I considered a genuine treat. Not everyone shares that opinion.


The Review Mirror, available at www.unsolicitedpress.com

Difficult Listening, Sundays from ten to noon (Central time), at http://www.radiofreenashville.org/.

http://home.comcast.net/~david.m.harris/site/


evemorton

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May 3, 2010, 8:14 PM

Post #2177 of 2652 (17944 views)
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Re: [pongo] Accepted to two colleges...lol...now what? [In reply to] Can't Post

I actually would be spending winter and summer residencies at the Washington campus. That I wouldn't mind at all...I'm right now highly considering Goddard.

Now, yes the optioned price for screenplays is pretty high, but it is extremely hard to sell a screenplay without actually knowing someone in the biz....which Goddard may help me with. And if I do sell one screenplay and can join Writer's Guild of America, then I could join the 50% of writers in the guild who have only sold one screenplay and have never sold another one. But I guess the cost of the option could pay for my student loans and I'd still have some dough left over to save until I sold another one...or to buy a new Hybrid car...by then there could be an even better car for the environment...haha.

Eve


Eve Morton


ahanridge


May 4, 2010, 11:35 AM

Post #2178 of 2652 (17884 views)
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Re: [Amy Peterson] Letters of Recommendation [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm a current Spalding student in fiction and as with a recent question here on Speakeasy regarding an application essay, I'd give the same advice in response to concerns about letters of rec... First, don't panic. Especially in a brief residency program, your case of not being in school for a while is a common one.

My two cents? No, I don't think name-dropping matters at all. But if you have a sincere writerly relationship with someone who simply happens to have "connections," I wouldn't discount that person as a potential letter-writer just because they have "a name," or I wouldn't worry that a relationship would appear like name-dropping if it is someone who truly knows you and/or your writing and can address your personal strengths in a letter of rec.

I'd say find people who can write about many aspects of you as a writer and as a prospective student. Your writing sample is crucially important in any MFA application. Your letters of rec should also address your writing skills, but can also address the kind of person and student you'll be in the low-res MFA writing community. Those qualities are important too.

And as always, I'd say contact the administrators if you have any real questions or concerns in your application. I know I contacted the program about several different specific concerns and I was always thankful I called or emailed when I did because the administration folks had a great way of easing my concerns, helping me to not panic and I never felt silly or belittled for any of the questions I asked.

hope this helps,

Amy, current Spalding fiction student



In Reply To
I was an English major with an emphasis in creative writing during my BA in the early 1990s. I quit my senior year due to family issues. I have now returned to finish and will complete my BA in Interdisciplinary Studies at another unknown university in August. I have started the process of applying to Seattle Pacific University, because I can apply in October for the March residency there. If that does not come to fruition, I have also started applications to Spalding and Antioch for summer 2011.

Because I have not been in a writing program in 15 years, and because my current classes are mostly online or were half semester (we take 2 classes in half a semester instead of 4 classes in a whole semester) it has been difficult to form close relationships with professors. Plus, I'm only going to be at this school a year to finish some requirements and finally earn my BA.

My work is mostly commercial writing and editing jobs, and by their nature, I have shorter term relationships with my clients, who obviously could not attest to my creative writing skill anyway.

I have many admirers of my plays and short fiction. However (a) my plan is to study creative non-fiction; and (b) none of these people has any particular academic credentials.

I did secure a letter of recommendation for a different sort of fellowship program from a writer with a very famous grandfather, and consequently last name, who runs a very prestigious short story contest. We have struck up a friendship on Facebook. I didn't get the fellowship, which is just as well, and serves as evidence that I know cheap name dropping won't get me in. Would it seem like cheap name dropping if I asked her to provide a letter? Not having much of a writing community right now, who else might I ask?



renila


May 4, 2010, 12:43 PM

Post #2179 of 2652 (17863 views)
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Re: [evemorton] Accepted to two colleges...lol...now what? [In reply to] Can't Post

Well, the option price of screenplays can be high in certain genres -- but it's very, very tough to get one on a spec script.

More often, new screenwriters end up giving free options, hoping a producer can set it up at a studio, thus producing a sale. Or you can use a great spec script to get rewrite work.

Also, I'm not sure where you live, but it's extremely difficult to break into the film business without living in Los Angeles. Even New York's tough except for arthouse/indies. The business-of-the-business is it's own strange beast.

It's also not the sort of thing that you should think two years in school will adequately prep you for. Be prepared to write and write and rewrite even though you have a day gig -- and on something that few people will ever see.

I'd ask to get put in touch with actual Goddard grads and see what kind of help getting connected they really received. Check out how recent the credits are of the profs. Stuff like that.

I'm a working WGA screenwriter, and I tend to think it takes an almost monomaniacal focus to get started in Hollywood -- if you're not prepared to commit to that level, you might be better off writing novels at a slower pace.

Which is meant not to be discouraging, but more as a reality check.

Good luck with your decision!


renila


May 4, 2010, 2:15 PM

Post #2180 of 2652 (17844 views)
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Re: [renila] Accepted to two colleges...lol...now what? [In reply to] Can't Post

I hate it's-its typos.

SIGH.


evemorton

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May 4, 2010, 5:02 PM

Post #2181 of 2652 (17814 views)
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Re: [renila] Accepted to two colleges...lol...now what? [In reply to] Can't Post


In Reply To
Well, the option price of screenplays can be high in certain genres -- but it's very, very tough to get one on a spec script.

More often, new screenwriters end up giving free options, hoping a producer can set it up at a studio, thus producing a sale. Or you can use a great spec script to get rewrite work.

Also, I'm not sure where you live, but it's extremely difficult to break into the film business without living in Los Angeles. Even New York's tough except for arthouse/indies. The business-of-the-business is it's own strange beast.

It's also not the sort of thing that you should think two years in school will adequately prep you for. Be prepared to write and write and rewrite even though you have a day gig -- and on something that few people will ever see.

I'd ask to get put in touch with actual Goddard grads and see what kind of help getting connected they really received. Check out how recent the credits are of the profs. Stuff like that.

I'm a working WGA screenwriter, and I tend to think it takes an almost monomaniacal focus to get started in Hollywood -- if you're not prepared to commit to that level, you might be better off writing novels at a slower pace.

Which is meant not to be discouraging, but more as a reality check.

Good luck with your decision!
___________________________________________________________________
Well, I have a few contacts in the business as well as a friend I met at a writer's conference who is an author/screenwriter. He's helped me quite a bit to hone my skills in screenwriting. I know it's a difficult business to dampen your feet but it's my passion and as it stands I can't really see myself doing anything else. I think Goddard is my best fit and if it takes years to break into the business then it takes years. I've waited this long...lol

Also, I know a few people who don't live in Hollywood but who continue to sell screenplays so I think there are some, but If I had to move to Los Angeles then I would just have to do that. I also have a really good friend who lives in the Hollywood area and who knows a lot of people in the business and she says she will get my script read when it's complete.

I already know how difficult it is to break into the business and so I'm more than prepared as you saw in the post before. The word "I can't" isn't in my vocabulary. I've gone through my own set backs in the last ten years and have been through a lot even by Hollywood standards as it is so I think I can handle whatever I have to do to follow what I love doing.


Eve Morton


JoanneMerriam
Joanne Merriam


Jun 19, 2010, 12:22 PM

Post #2182 of 2652 (17110 views)
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Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

I'm looking at possibly doing a MFA. I've just hit the 6-month mark at work, which means my new employer will now pay 70% of my tuition (and it doesn't have to be work-related). Vanderbilt, afaik the only school with an MFA program in Nashville where I live, doesn't allow part-time studies, so low-residency MFAs are my only option I think. Being able to get funding to cover the 30% I'll have to pay would be a plus (otherwise I'll have to get student loans), but I understand there's not generally much funding for low-res?

I want to concentrate on poetry, though it would be nice to have some fiction mentoring too. The program has to allow me to do one semester a year, as I won't be able to tackle 20-30 hours of reading/writing on top of my 40-hour work week and other commitments more often than that. Or, if it's allowed anywhere to take only one class at a time (assuming the work is split up into classes) that would be better for me financially.

I haven't written the GRE yet (nor started studying for it) and don't anticipate starting earlier than Fall 2012, so at this point I'm just information-gathering. I have a longish list of low-res MFA programs what general criteria would you all recommend I look at? Besides who the faculty is and the school's reputation.


Editor: 7x20 * Upper Rubber Boot Books
Most recently: Apocalypse Now: Poems and Prose from the End of Days (Atwood, Bacigalupi, JCO, etc.)

Writer: joannemerriam.com * The Glaze from Breaking (poetry)


edwriter



Jun 19, 2010, 12:31 PM

Post #2183 of 2652 (17108 views)
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Re: [JoanneMerriam] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi, Joanne:

If you're still looking for program possibilities to add, check my ever-growing list of low-res programs at http://practicing-writing.blogspot.com/...tudy-mfa-and_28.html

I've pretty much summarized what I think people considering low-res programs should bear in mind in a chapter that was published in the second edition of Tom Kealey's MFA Handbook. One point I'd emphasize is that if you're going to be in a low-res program that relies on a distance-learning workshop rather than the mentorship model, you'll want to be assured of working with strong students (with good skills as both writers and readers-critics) as much as you'll want to be working with strong faculty.

Keep us posted, and good luck.

Best,
Erika D.


Quiet Americans: Stories
http://www.erikadreifus.com



pongo
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Jun 19, 2010, 1:04 PM

Post #2184 of 2652 (17105 views)
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Re: [edwriter] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Joanne, I did my MFA at Goddard, so if you have questions about that program in particular or low-res in general, feel free to ask.


The Review Mirror, available at www.unsolicitedpress.com

Difficult Listening, Sundays from ten to noon (Central time), at http://www.radiofreenashville.org/.

http://home.comcast.net/~david.m.harris/site/


elissa
Elissa Field


Jun 19, 2010, 2:55 PM

Post #2185 of 2652 (17091 views)
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Re: [emjayroads] Anyone know about Carlow or Fairfield [In reply to] Can't Post

emjayroads, Just came across your post from last spring. I haven't known anyone else who went to Carlow, but had been curious about it as I am planning to do a low res MFA and I needed to travel back to Ireland to complete research for one of my works anyway. What has your experience been? I'm curious about the program itself, the faculty/workshops, and also if the travel cost was daunting. (Not sure if you will have left yet, but you can comment when you return if not)

I hope it is a great experience for you!


http://elissafield.wordpress.com/
http://www.facebook.com/...p?id=100001772022683


jlgwriter
Jeanne Lyet Gassman
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Jun 19, 2010, 3:49 PM

Post #2186 of 2652 (17085 views)
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Re: [JoanneMerriam] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Joanne,

My experience with low-res MFA (based on my research and my MFA from Vermont) is that most of the low-res programs don't have "classes" you take but rather an independent study approach. The 20-30 hours a week commitment is usually for both the reading and the creative/critical writing. Considering how often you submit and publish, I doubt the writing portion would be a huge difference from what you are already doing.

I would look closely at the structure of the low-res program-- Is it a mentorship program or a workshop program? In the mentorship program, you are assigned an advisor each semester who works with you one-on-one with your creative work. At Vermont, we submitted packets of creative and/or critical writing 5 times a semester to our advisor. The advisor responded to each packet with edits of our creative work and a letter discussing goals, issues, suggestions, etc. I haven't worked in the workshop semester format, but I believe the student is assigned to a group who are all advisees of one faculty member. Both students and faculty then provide feedback on each assigned writing packet. I chose Vermont because I really wanted the mentoring environment.

Another thing you should at is the program's policy on a leave of absence. At Vermont, students can take a semester off if the work load or personal commitments become too overwhelming. I don't know what the rules are at other programs.

Also, look at the guidelines on dual-genre. Some programs will allow you to do dual genre. In other words, you can get your MFA with a concentration in two genres rather than one. Vermont allows dual genre, but you have to attend for a 5th semester. You alternate between genres each semester, and your creative thesis consists of work in both genres.

Other things to consider: Does the school offer residencies outside of their main location? This is becoming more common. VCFA offers a summer residency in Slovenia, and I've heard rumors that they may be starting a winter residency in Puerto Rico. Is there a translation program (if that's something you're interested in)? When do the residencies take place? (Not all of them are in the same time frame.) How long are the residencies and where do you stay? Some low-res programs place students on a campus while others use local hotels. The campus housing for VCFA is rather primitive (old dorms), but the location was extremely convenient. Of course, Montpelier is so small that almost anywhere you stay is pretty close to the residency activities.

And do consider the faculty. Some faculty are better writers than teachers, so their fame/reputation isn't always the best guide. Once you narrow your list, post some of your questions here (or PM various low-res students). I'll be happy to answer your questions about VCFA.

I loved my low-res experience, btw. Learned so much!

Jeanne
http://www.jeannelyetgassman.com
http://jeannelyetgassman.blogspot.com


http://www.jeannelyetgassman.com
http://jeannelyetgassman.blogspot.com


JoanneMerriam
Joanne Merriam


Jun 19, 2010, 7:52 PM

Post #2187 of 2652 (17059 views)
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Re: [jlgwriter] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Erika, David, Jeanne, thanks for your comments. I am just at the beginning of considering this so it'll probably be awhile before I have questions, and then I'll have lots! It's good to know I have this forum as a resource.


Editor: 7x20 * Upper Rubber Boot Books
Most recently: Apocalypse Now: Poems and Prose from the End of Days (Atwood, Bacigalupi, JCO, etc.)

Writer: joannemerriam.com * The Glaze from Breaking (poetry)


elissa
Elissa Field


Jun 19, 2010, 9:54 PM

Post #2188 of 2652 (17047 views)
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Re: [jlgwriter] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Jeanne, I second your comment that the best mentors/teachers aren't necessarily the best writers. The two most famous writers I worked with were the ones with the least to offer. Several others who were far from famous (and even a couple whose work I didn't enjoy much) were amazingly insightful & generous teachers.

I'd also heard the warning about not picking a program based on faculty -- because sometimes they are emeritus (on faculty but don't teach) or on sabbatical, or may be listed but not there all the time. If you ARE choosing the program based on faculty, you might do a search on that faculty member -- see if they are listed as faculty at multiple institutions (one instructor I liked comes to mind, as I happened to notice him listed at easily a half dozen conferences/workshops one year, which begged the question how much time he spent at each) -- or ask the program how much time he/she is on campus.


http://elissafield.wordpress.com/
http://www.facebook.com/...p?id=100001772022683


ahanridge


Jun 27, 2010, 9:56 PM

Post #2189 of 2652 (16816 views)
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Re: [JoanneMerriam] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi Joanne, I saw your post inquiring about low-res MFA programs in poetry, with only one semester per year. While I'm a fiction student, not a poet, I thought I'd mention the program I'm currently completing my MFA through. It's Spalding University and I thought I'd just mention it because Spalding has a "Spring Stretch" option where students can choose to attend only the May residency in KY and then complete the semester over a longer time-frame. Also, Spalding has a residency-abroad option where students attend a summer residency abroad and then complete the longer-time-frame semester, too. I'm working under the Spring-Stretch model right now and really appreciate the extra time. Spalding's residency abroad next year is in Tuscany and I'm due to graduate in May in KY.... but I'm seriously considering graduating in Tuscany!

Good luck with your decision.

Amy


evemorton

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Jul 6, 2010, 10:54 PM

Post #2190 of 2652 (16702 views)
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Any packing tips for Goddard Port Townsend residency? [In reply to] Can't Post

Hello! My first residency isn't until February (I'm a planner) but has anyone on here attended the Goddard Port Townsend residency? I am trying to decide if I need to purchase a new carry on bag small enough by airline standards but large enough to carry a laptop plus a scaled down week of clothes (a couple of jeans, jacket, and a couple of tops with one pair of shoes...is that all I would need) and no checked bag or if a checked bag (with more clothes, etc) plus a smaller carry on (laptop) would be okay? I don't know if the luggage is safe in the dorm rooms and if I should scale down my items or not...and if I'll be carting the luggage halfway across campus...really don't want to do that with two bags.

If anyone could give me some packing tips I would kiss the sky and send the moon to hell and back...well, not really, but I might say thank you. :-)

Eve


Eve Morton


pongo
Buy this book!

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Jul 7, 2010, 9:32 AM

Post #2191 of 2652 (16685 views)
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Re: [evemorton] Any packing tips for Goddard Port Townsend residency? [In reply to] Can't Post

My experience is only with the Plainfield residencies, but I never heard of a theft on campus (except one car, which we figure was stolen by non-students, and was part of Clockhouse rather than the official residency).

Remember that you're going for the winter residency first, so clothes will be a little bulkier. You may want something a little nicer for evenings, or not; personal style varies. Perhaps one nice outfit for your reading (everyone is encouraged, but not required, to participate in the readings).

Most people bring a few books, either references for their writing or just something to read in downtime. I don't know if Port Townsend has Wi-Fi, but if you have internet access you may not need hardcopy books.

You'll actually get a packing list at some point, and it tends to be overcautious. Desk lamps and fans are not, in fact, essential (and sometimes show up in the rooms anyway). There are probably laundry machines (I know there are in Plainfield) if you want to take a little time and cut your clothing in half. If you're a tea drinker, you might want to bring some supplies. Tea or coffee, you may want a travel cup, although you can probably buy one onsite.

And a little luggage roller isn't that expensive.


The Review Mirror, available at www.unsolicitedpress.com

Difficult Listening, Sundays from ten to noon (Central time), at http://www.radiofreenashville.org/.

http://home.comcast.net/~david.m.harris/site/


jacarty
Jessie Carty
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Jul 27, 2010, 9:31 AM

Post #2192 of 2652 (16564 views)
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Re: [JoanneMerriam] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Hey Joanne! I haven't been in in a while but excellent to see you are thinking about the MFA and the low-res, especially with tuition help!

I worked for part of my low-res MFA time when I went to Queens and while there was a lot of workload I was able to keep up with it and work full-time even though there were two residencies a year. Did most of my reading on the weekend and then my critiquing in between working files or on my lunch break.

Feel free to email me offsite at jessie.carty(at)gmail.com if you want to hear more about Queens. I did the poetry track there :)


http://jessiecarty.com


writerle


Aug 20, 2010, 1:35 PM

Post #2193 of 2652 (16440 views)
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Re: [jacarty] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

My alma mater, Vermont College of Fine Arts, was just rated the top low-res MFA program in the country by Poets & Writers. Go VCFA!


patrickdunn


Aug 20, 2010, 4:58 PM

Post #2194 of 2652 (16425 views)
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Re: [writerle] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Does anyone know of any comprehensive rankings for low res programs that takes quality of program/cost/possibility of funding (slim to non-existent, I know) like the Creative Writing MFA Handbook does? I'm leaning towards traditional residency programs, but if I could find a way to do low res on the cheap and still at a good program, that could change things a bit.

Thanks!


maybemd


Aug 30, 2010, 1:27 AM

Post #2195 of 2652 (16284 views)
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Re: [JoanneMerriam] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Hi Joanne: I haven't come across any low-residency programs which require GREs. Don't waste time fretting over them if you don't have to.

Why wait until 2012? It might be too late to apply to most programs (many have chosen Sept. 1st as the application deadline for January 2011) but Goddard has rolling admissions and their application deadline for their January 2011 start isn't until early December (the 7th?). There are probably other good programs with later, or rolling, admission dates.

How about picking four or five programs that you'd be most willing to travel to, read the info on their websites, and request their information packages? I did that a couple months ago, thinking I'd apply for June 2011. Decided to go for January 2011 (I'm not getting any younger!). That left only a month to request transcripts, write my personal and critical essays, and revise a couple short stories for my manuscript submission. But it all came together. Well it's more like I shoved it all together. Hoping at least one of the schools' admissions committees likes what they see.

By the way, two months ago I couldn't think of anyone to ask for letters of recommendation. My bachlor's of very many years ago was in biology, not Lit. or English, and I haven't taken any college level writing courses since a grant writing course in the 80's. But one of my instructors at Gotham Writers' Workshop was happy to serve as one of my references, as was the leader of the fiction workshop I took at a conference in June. And not just any workshop leader, but Lee K. Abbott. His yes blew me away. Then there were the leaders of my poetry group, the editor of the journal that published a couple of stories and a poem of mine, the woman who included me on a panel of writers at the community college three years ago, and some others. What a confidence booster. So you never know, you have to ask.

Writing the essays was also a positive experience. The process forced me to consider where I'd like my writing career to go, what my next big projects are, and clarified my relationship with writing, and what I think writing is, as an art form.

If I'm accepted into more than one program, then the process of choosing which program to enroll in will become another learning experience. Do I want to emphasize teaching? Work on developing a reputation as a coach and a critic? Investigate leading workshops in other countries? Work with specific instructors?

It's all very exciting. I can't wait to join what one college calls their "community of writers", and form a close network with folks who understand what I'm going through, and BS and party, and trade sob stories with. I wish I could have started this journey ten or more years ago, but I wasn't a writer then, and I didn't have the stories in me that I have now.


(This post was edited by maybemd on Aug 30, 2010, 1:31 AM)


elissa
Elissa Field


Sep 6, 2010, 3:57 PM

Post #2196 of 2652 (16203 views)
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Re: [maybemd] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

May, thanks for sharing this! I loved reading how your experience has gone. It's great that the process itself has become part of the writing journey for you, as it so often can just feel like a bureucratic pitstop. Good luck with your applications, and be sure to keep us posted how it progresses! Where did you apply?

As of last month, I put applying on hold as I was hired as a part time writing teacher in a middle school, and the kids' semester just perfectly prevents me from taking off for a winter residency, assuming I put their needs ahead of my own. Hmph. I've been most interested in Warren Wilson, Vermont and Queens, lately. But then put the New Orleans program back on my list -- the one where residencies are done in summer, at locations in Prague, Italy, etc. Does anyone have any experience with that program? I could never tell if it was a really awesome opportunity, or more recreational -- like a travel tour program and oh yeah, there's writing too.


http://elissafield.wordpress.com/
http://www.facebook.com/...p?id=100001772022683


maybemd


Sep 29, 2010, 8:58 PM

Post #2197 of 2652 (16031 views)
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Re: [elissa] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

About three weeks after submitting my application package electronically to Vermont College of Fine Arts, I got the phone call from the program's director. Then received an e-mail from a member of their application review committee, who complimented my manuscript and answered questions about the mentoring process.

Went off for a week's vacation (at a cottage in Algonkian Park in VA) and returned to messages of acceptance from Bennington and Warren Wilson. Scrambled together a spreadsheet comparing aspects of the three programs, called a writer-friend and talked all the pros and cons at her, and gave myself until 3 p.m. today to decide.

I'm going to Warren Wilson.

Although I believe I would have been happy in any of the three wonderful programs, I prefer the smaller residencies of WW, and there are specific instructors there that I'd be very glad to have as mentors.



elissa
Elissa Field


Sep 29, 2010, 9:09 PM

Post #2198 of 2652 (16028 views)
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Re: [maybemd] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

May, I've been having a crazy busy week and hadn't had chance to send a thought-out reply to your PM, but I'm excited at your choice. First, serious congrats being chosen for all 3 (wonderful predicament to be in -- to get to choose from 3 great schools). You were accepted by schools I really like as well, so could understand your concern in deciding. Have to say, you chose my favorite of the 3. I hesitated saying that right away, wanting to think through if it were maybe for reasons personal to me (like, easier access from where I am, family nearby - those sorts of reasons which wouldn't impact you). But since you chose, I can say it was my favorite, Vermont was second.

Can't wait to hear more about it. Did you actually send the acceptance? Really wonderful, all round!

elissa


http://elissafield.wordpress.com/
http://www.facebook.com/...p?id=100001772022683


edwriter



Sep 29, 2010, 9:38 PM

Post #2199 of 2652 (16025 views)
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Re: [maybemd] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

What a great set of responses, May! Congrats. Sounds as though you are definitely on your way!

Best,
Erika D.


Quiet Americans: Stories
http://www.erikadreifus.com



alamana
Jennifer Brown


Sep 30, 2010, 8:24 AM

Post #2200 of 2652 (16004 views)
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Re: [maybemd] Low-Residency MFAs [In reply to] Can't Post

Congratulations May. It sounds like you made a great choice. I hope you enjoy your program and learn tons.


Be regular and orderly in your life, that you may be violent and original in your work. -- Flaubert

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