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Magazine articles tagged with Southern writing.

From the Magazine

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Daily News

Sarabande Books opens new offices in New York City; Gary Shteyngart to decrease blurbing habit; a “poetry fence” in Alexandria, Virginia; and other news.

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Daily News

A game show winner turned bookseller; literary apps using cartography; the history behind Wes Anderson’s muse; and other news.

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Daily News

New York City’s Rare Book Week; the exploitation of Detroit’s decay; writers reflect on the portrayal of Appalachia; and other news.

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Daily News

Kiese Laymon on the politics of black male action; Patrick Leigh Fermor book and Tennessee Williams short story each published after an eighty-year wait; Scribd’s new travel book section; and other news.

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Daily News

Digital Book World reports e-book revenue growth is slowing; Dwight Garner parses the legacy of the Oxford American; the Millions features useful holiday gifts ideas for writers; and other news.

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Daily News

In the United Kingdom, thieves robbed Brontë Chapel, where the Brontë sisters were baptized; Arthur Krystal explores the sometimes-heated discussion concerning genre and literary fiction; literary agent Janet Reid offers advice to writers interested in self-publishing.

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Daily News

Tips for building your National Novel Writing Month survival kit; Barnes & Noble's founder, Leonard Riggio, intends to build and furnish one hundred homes in New Orleans; young Eudora Welty's failed attempt at landing a job at the New Yorker; and other news.

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News and Trends

May/June 2012

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Southwest Review, Oxford American, Midwestern Gothic, the Los Angeles Review, ZYZZYVA, Hawk & Handsaw, and Common.

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Feature

March/April 2002

So how did John Dufresne—the eldest of four children of French-Canadian parents, a boy who grew up in the Catholic, blue-collar Grafton Hill neighborhood of Worcester, Massachusetts, a boy for whom it was beyond imagining that a man might find his vocation in words—become a noted short story writer, a sought-after teacher of creative writing, and the author of three acclaimed novels, two of which are set well below the Mason-Dixon line? In part, the answer is a keen ear for the music of language and an eye for the telling detail.

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